BIOGRAPHIES, Greenbrier County, WV - "A"

THE ALDERSON FAMILY.

Among the prominent and distinguished families of Monroe County few can lay claim to a more honorable lineage or to a more splendid record for public-spirited citizenship than that bearing the name of Alderson. This family traces back to John Alderson, the progenitor in the United States of the Aldersons of West Virginia, who came from Yorkshire, England, and first located in New Jersey, where he married Mary Curtis, and for a time was engaged in agricultural pursuits. Later he entered the ministry of the Baptist Church, and followed that calling during the remainder of his life, in Pennsylvania and Maryland. He became the father of three sons and one daughter.

One of the sons of the immigrant John Alderson, "Elder John" Alderson, became historically connected with the early history of the southeastern part of what is now West Virginia. As a Baptist missionary he located in the immediate vicinity of Alderson, West Virginia, in 1774, and until the establishment of a church in 1781 visited around in the sparsely settled country, preaching and exhorting and bringing the Word to the pioneers. He became widely known and universally beloved, and continued as pastor of the church which he had founded until his death. He was born March 5, 1738, and October 31, 1759, married Mary Elizabeth Carroll, their children being: Alice, George, Mary, John (I), Joseph, Thomas, Margaret, Jane and John. These children of "Elder John" Anderson were fine characters and left honored names for their descendants, many of whom yet live in this section. George married a Miss Osborne, Joseph married "Polly" Newman, Margaret married Thomas Smithson, Jane married William McClung and John was married three times, first to Jane Walker, who bore him six children, next to Nancy (Robinson) Mays, who also bore him six children, and next to Millie Milholland. He died in 1853.

John Alderson, the youngest son of "Elder John," was a farmer of Monroe County, and owned the Alderson ferry across the Greenbrier River. His home was the present site of the hotel. Of all his children but one now survives, he being familiarly known as "Uncle" George Alderson, and he is the "youngest son of the youngest son." "Uncle" George Alderson was born November 13, 1833, "the night the stars fell." He grew up in the immediate vicinity of his birthplace and makes his home on a part of the original farm. Under the legislative grant of 1789 the Alderson ferry was established, but as time passed and others came to live here the name was dropped and ever since the place has been known as Alderson. The original farm of John Alderson was over 200 acres, but the present farm of his son George consists of 175 acres. George Alderson has always followed farming. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1862, and during the greater part of his service acted as orderly for Generals Loring and Echols. He was elected a justice of the peace at the first election after the close of the war between the states, when the Confederates were again given the full rights of citizenship, and in 1885 was elected a representative to the last Legislature that was held at Wheeling, during which he was the author of the amendment to the penal law which provided a penalty of from one to two years' confinement for breaking into outbuildings with intent to steal. He has been twice married, first to Mary Jane Hines, who bore him three children: Charles O., who died in infancy; Emma Cornelia, connected with the Alderson Baptist Academy ever since its organization; and Ida, now deceased. Mr. Alderson's second marriage was with Virginia Stevens, and to this union there were born six children: John C., the only survivor: Bernard C.; William; George, who served two terms in the State Legislature; Virginia, who died as the wife of Charles B. Rowe, and Coleman C. Mr. Alderson is a democrat in politics and a Mason fraternally, and since its organization has been a director in the First National Bank. For forty years he was superintendent of the Baptist Sunday School, and for a longer period has been a deacon in the church.

On November 13, 1867, Mr. Alderson married Virginia M. Stevens, and their wedded life has covered a period of more than fifty-four years. On their Golden Wedding Anniversary, November 13, 1917, which was also Mr. Alderson's eighty-fourth birthday, eighty-five guests gathered at the pleasant home on Sunset Hill, this being the first Golden Wedding celebration ever held in the community. Mrs. Alderson is a daughter of J. W. P. Stevens, of English ancestry, and a native of New Hampshire, who came to Alderson as a young man and married Miriam Gwinn. For nearly a half a century he was a teacher in the surrounding schools. He was a fine penman, and because of his splendid education and beautiful penmanship more of the deeds and official papers, as well as family records, are in his handwriting than all others combined.

George Alderson, another son of Elder John Alderson, moved to Kanawha County, where he was engaged in salt production, and while his brothers were interested in the same business with him they maintained their homes in Greenbrier County. He became prominent in Kanawha County, and served as sheriff, and Alderson Street, Charleston, is named in his honor. George Alderson was a man of rugged type and of unusual force. He was elected and served several terms in the Virginia Legislature, where his practical knowledge was invaluable. Many interesting anecdotes are related of this man. It is told that he selected the largest corn cob that he could find, converted it into a pipe, and when his confreres remarked upon its size, replied that it was "merely a'nubbin.' "

Joseph Alderson, son of Elder John Alderson, was elected sheriff of Monroe County, and after moving to Greenbrier County was a justice of the peace and a member of the Virginia State Legislature. He married "Polly" Newman, a daughter of Jonathan Newman a survivor of the Revolutionary battle of Guilford, and they had a large family. One son, George, known as "Colonel George," lived at DeKalb in Fayette County, and was married twice, first to Jeanette McCleary and then to Eliza Davis, by both of whom he had children, many of whose descendants are now living at and around Alderson, which town was named in honor of the family. John Marshall Alderson, the oldest child of the first marriage, was deputy sheriff and sheriff of Greenbrier County for years, and died in 1861. His wife was Cornelia Coleman, of Amherst County, Virginia, and they had nine children, seven growing to maturity: Sallie, who became the wife of Capt. John G. Lobban; James Powell; Joseph N.; Millie J., who was Mrs. Andrew J. Riffe; John M.; Cornelia M., who became Mrs. Taylor Mann; and Lucy, who became Mrs. E. R. Lewis. The mother of these children died in 1880. Of this family Joseph N. Alderson married Lillie Putney, of Kanawha County, and was engaged in railroad work as agent during his early manhood, later followed merchandising at Alderson, and served as post master during President Cleveland's first administration; also being otherwise prominent in localaffairs. He and his wife had four children: Marshall P., who died in infancy; James M., who also died as an infant; Alethea T.; and Joseph N. The last named married Miss Frances Richardson, of Huntington, West Virginia, and they have two children: Frances and Alice Todd. Mr. Alderson was engaged in banking at Alderson until appointed postmaster in 1914, his term expiring in 1923, he being the third of his name to officiate as such. He is a past master of Alderson Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and is a Presbyterian in religious faith.

John M. Alderson, the only surviving child of John Marshall and Cornelia (Coleman) Alderson, was born at what was then Palestine, Greenbrier County, West Virginia, February 11, 1854, and received only limited educational advantages. He left home at the age of nineteen years to become a telegraph operator and railroad agent, and in 1884 embarked in mercantile pursuits at Alderson, in which he has been engaged to the present. At one time he was the owner of a large number of branch stores, but at the present confines his attention to three establishments. During President Cleveland's second administration he served as postmaster, but he has never cared particularly for public office, preferring merely to exercise his right of franchise as an American citizen. He has been a supporter of democratic principles, in religion is a Baptist, and fraternally is affiliated with the Master Masons.

On February 16, 1893, Mr. Alderson married Miss Florence Hedges, of Mount Sterling, Ohio, and to this union there have been born five children: Gladys Cless, who is unmarried and resides with her parents; Cornelia Coleman, who is the wife of H. L. Smith; Florence Marshall, who is the wife of O. B. Kirby; John Marshall, a member of the Students Reserve Corps at the University of Richmond during the World war, now in business with his father, married Miss Elizabeth Creigh; and Julia Hodges, with her parents.

It goes without saying that the descendants of Elder John Alderson are, for the most part, Baptists in religion, although late generations have accepted other faiths. So far as is known they have been democrats. None have been known to have violated the laws of the land; and, on the other hand, many have held important official positions with credit. On the whole, the Alderson's are recognized as among the solid and substantial people of West Virginia, a credit to the state and nation.

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York, Volume III, pgs. 618-19
Submitted by Valerie Crook.

JOSEPH N. ALDERSON, JR.

The subject of this sketch, the present postmaster of Alderson, is the seventh in descent from John Alderson, the founder of the town of Alderson. Joseph N. Alderson, Sr., a well known merchant of the place, was the son of John Marshall and Cornelia (Coleman) Alderson. He was born February 20, 1848, and died August 10, 1901. His wife was Lillie Putney, daughter of Richard Putney, of Kanawha county, whom he married October 20, 1875. Their children were: James Moseley (deceased) ; Joseph N. Alderson, Jr., Aletha Todd Alderson, and Marshall Putney Alderson (deceased).

Joseph N. Alderson, Jr., was born June 8, 1887, and was educated and reared in the town of his birth. On February 14, 1911, he married Miss Frances Richardson, daughter of William Richardson, of Huntington. To this union were born Frances Aletha and Alice Todd Alderson.

Mr. Alderson has been a successful merchant and business man in Alderson and was connected with the First National Bank of that place for several years. He has been postmaster of Alderson since February 19, 1914.

History of Greenbrier County
J. R. Cole
Lewisburg, WV 1917
p. 229-230
Submitted by Sandy Spradling: SSpradling@AOL.com

JOSEPH ANDERSON - one of the farming residents of Fort Spring district, Greenbrier County, was born and raised in this county, February 18, 1816 the date of his birth, and Peter L. and Rebecca (FLACK) ANDERSON his parents. His father is deceased, his mother living at the age of eighty-nine years, and still able to walk two or three miles without fatigue. She has 197 descendants, ten children, 98 grandchildren, 89 great-grandchildren. The first wife of Joseph ANDERSON was Jerdena BOBBITT, whom he married October l1, 1840, and who died September 1864. Their children were ten: Jerdena J., born August 23, 1841, lives in this county; Peter L., April 16, 1843, died October 3, 1854; John W., February 18, 1845, was a member of Zane's company, Sweeny's battalion, and killed in a charge eight miles below Winchester, Virginia; Sarah R., October 8, 1847, lives in Greenbrier County; Amanda M., October 31, 1849, lives in this county on Muddy creek; James, May 26, 1853, died at the age of two months; George W. S., July 30, 1854, lives at home; Nannie A., October 28, 1856, lives in this county; Joseph T. and Henry C., April 18, 1860, Henry C. died in infancy, Joseph T. lives at home. In Greenbrier County, January 14, 1868, Joseph ANDERSON married Mary WHANGER, who was born in this county, August 14, 1837. David and Amelia (TIPTON) WHANGER were her parents, and her father died in 1861. Joseph ANDERSON was a lieutenant in the State militia at the age of nineteen, and was afterward commissioned captain. He served seven years with the 135th Virginia Militia. He was justice of the peace in Fort Spring district nearly three years and then resigned. He has been severely afflicted with rhumatism for many years, and has not walked for more than eight years, although otherwise blessed with good health, sleeping and eating well. He has borne this great affliction with the patience and fortitude of the Christian, and that unmurmuring submission to the Divine Will that sustains the child of God, his daily life one of unexampled piety. The family post office address is Ronceverte, Greenbrier County. West Virginia.

[Joseph ANDERSON died Feb. 4, 1889, age 72 yrs, 11 mo., 16 da, of erysipelas. Death reported by Mary ANDERSON, wife. Parents listed as Peter and Rebecca ANDERSON. Listed in Vol. 1 and Vol. 1A of Greenbrier County Death Records. vfc]

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty's Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.
Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, 1998.

THE ARBUCKLE FAMILY.

The Arbuckles came from Scotland and first settled in Pennsylvania. One family came from Pennsylvania and settled on the James river, near what is now called Balcony Falls, in Rockbridge county. Three brothers-Mathew, William and Thomas started from their settlement to the Greenbrier valley. Thomas was killed while hunting during the trip and Mathew and William settled at Fort Union, now Lewisburg. Mathew was a captain in the army and in a march of about nineteen days through the virgin forest guided Gen. Andrew Lewis' army from Fort Union to Point Pleasant, leaving Fort Union September 19, 1774, and fought the battle of Point Pleasant October 10, 1774.

William Arbuckle, brother of Capt. Mathew Arbuckle, was with the army at Point Pleasant and afterward, about 1796 or 1797, moved, and settled in Putnam county, on the Kanawha river. Capt. Mathew Arbuckle remained in comand of the fort at Point Pleasant until after 1777. In 1781, as he was returning from Richmond on a commission for the army, he was killed on Jackson river, in Bath county, June 27, 1787, in a storm, by the falling of a tree, under which he was caught. He was the father of a large family of sons and daughters, and many of his posterity are now valued citizens of the Greenbrier valley. One of his sons, Cen. Mathew Arbuckle, was with army in the Arkansas - many years and until his death, and was said to have had great influence among the Indians in his time. His name is revered in that country to this day. His brother, William, who settled in Putnam county, reared a large family of daughters, from whom descended many of the prominent families of Putnam and Mason counties. The only family of the name there now is that of James H. Arbuckle, of Putnam county, but he is a great-grandson of Capt. Mathew Arbuckle.

John William Arbuckle, a prominent lawyer of Lewisburg, W. Va., for many years mayor of the town, and an able, efficient executive officer. As a member of the West Virginia State Senate was chairman of the judiciary committee. He has been honorably and effectively identified with the best interests of State and church. Twice married, first to Mary Tate Finley, of Augusta county, Virginia, in October, 1878, to which union four children were born: Finley M. Arbuckle, one of the leading and prosperous young business men of the town. Chosen justice of the peace at the age of twenty-one, has been successively elected to succeed himself. Once mayor of the town and has been for years appointed to audit the financial accounts of the county and district treasurer.

James Edward Arbuckle, one of the young members of the bar. John Tate Arbuckle, a succesful traveling salesman of Charleston, W. Va. Mary Hale Arbuckle, a most competent and efficient teacher in the primary department of the Lewisburg Female Institute.

His second marriage, in April, 1892, to Mary Withers Young, of Staunton, Va. To this union four children came: William Withers Arbuckle, a graduate of the Greenbrier Presbyterial School and of Hampden-Sydney College, Virginia. Taught one year at Porter Military Academy, Charleston, S. C., and two year's at Cluster Springs Academy, Virginia. For three terms instructor at Laurel Park Summer School at Hendersonville, N. C. Recently, at twenty-three years of age, elected professor of history and mathematics in Alexandria High School, Virginia. Three daughters are at home with their parents. A brother, Andrew Alexander Arbuckle, now of Howard county, Missouri, was a cadet at the Virginia Military Institute, less than seventeen years of age, in May, 1864, when they were called to the Confederate army, and participated in the famous charge at the battle of New Market. Junius S. Arbuckle, now a prosperous grape grower of California, who had three brothers in the Confederate army, now has four sons prepared for the army training camp. The Arbuckles are of Scotch descent and among them many faithful and devoted ruling elders in the Presbyterian church, in West Virginia and in California, Kentucky, North Carolina andTexas, States to which they have gone. The women, as the men, consecrated, faithful and constant in devotion to piety. A clan true to God; true to country; true to self.

History of Greenbrier County
J. R. Cole
Lewisburg, WV 1917
p. 220-222
Submitted by Sandy Spradling: SSpradling@AOL.com

JACOB ARGABRITE.

Jacob Argabrite was born in 1760, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, came to Rockingham county, Virginia, in boyhood. Volunteered, May, 1778, for six months in the militia company of Captain Craven and served at the forts in Tyggart's Valley. Reenlisted and served in the same company three months longer. Marched to Fort Pitt and Tuscarara river, serving under General McIntosh and helping to build Fort Lawrence in Ohio. Between Fort McIntosh and Fort Lawrence he saw the corpse of Lieutenant Parks, who had been killed by the Indians. In retaliation, Colonel Crawford wished to kill nine or ten Indians who had come for a peace parley, but was prevented by other officers. About September, 1780, he enlisted for twelve months in the cavalry company of Captain Sullivan, of Berkeley county. Campaigned in the Carolinas and was in the battle of the Cowpens. His term expired at Bowling Green, Va. He then joined a rifle company under Captain Coker, and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis. He was discharged for illness late in October, while conveying the British prisoners from Yorktown. Caine to Monroe some years after the war. Declaration, 1882. Proof of alleged facts required in Pension Office.

He subsequently removed to Greenbrier county, andd his will, made April 1, 1844, and recorded in the clerk's office of Greenbrier county, is as follows, which we give because it is the only source at our disposal to give the names of his children:

"In the name of God-Amen. I, Jacob Argabrite, of the county of Greenbrier and the State of Virginia, being weak in body, but of sound and perfect mind and memory, and considering the uncertainty of life, do make and establish this my last will and testament (revoking all former wills and testaments by me made), in manner and form following, to-wit:
"First, I give and bequeath to my beloved wife so much of my household furniture of every description as she choses to keep and so much of the proceeds of my estate as will be necessary for her comfortable support during her natural life:
"I give and bequeath to my daughter, Betsy Sydenstricker, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to my son, Martin, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to my daughter, Mary Ann Lewis, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to the heirs of my deceased daughter, Catherine Dunbar, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to my son, John, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to the heirs of my deceased son, William, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to my son, Abram, one hundred and forty dollars.
"I give and bequeath to my daughter, Rebecca Rodgers, one hundred and forty dollars.
"My sons, Isaac and Samuel, have been heretofore provided for and received their full share for which I have taken their receipts as acquittal.
"After my decease I wish the several legacies to be paid over as soon as collected in the order in which they are named, beginning with the oldest, except the heirs of the two deceased children, which are to be paid last. Whatever remainder there may be after the decease of my beloved wife, I wish to be equally divided between all my heirs.
"I appoint my son, John Argabrite, executor of this my last Will and testament.
"In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal.
"This first day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand, eight hundred and forty-four.

JACOB ARGABRITE (Seal). "J. W. P. STEVENS, "SAMUEL A. MCCLUNG, "AUSTIN EADS".

Mr. Argabrite died soon after making the above will, and was buried in the Hockman family graveyard just below their old home on Muddy creek. The old gentleman was an ardent Democrat while Greenbrier county was overwhelmingly Whig. In the "Hard Cider" campaign of "Tippecanoe and Tyler, too," the Whigs came in procession from Frankfort to Lewisburg, a distance of about ten miles, headed by a wagon drawn by three teams of fine Greenbrier horses. On the wagon sat a log cabin, with some coon skins tacked on the walls, and a barrel of hard cider just inside the door, which an attendant was serving out to the public. Mr. Argabrite was standing on the streets of Lewisburg, an indignant spectator. Somebody asked him what he thought of it; he vehemently replied: "What dam foolishness, what damn foolishness, and so agra-provoking!"

Colonel John Argabrite, a son of Jacob Argabrite, the Revolutionary soldier mentioned above, was born February 17, 1797, and died December 10, 1884. He married Mary, daughter of Jacob Hockman, who lived in the old stone house that stands on Muddy creek, which he had built as a home. It is now owned by a descendant, Mrs. Mary Gwinn.

Colonel Argabrite was not in favor of secession, so he became eligible to sit on the Board of Supervisors of Blue Sulphur district. A story is told of him about this time. It was true, he said, that he was a Union man, opposed to secession, and always had been, but was always glad when our boys whipped. He was a prominent man in the county, and took part in its politics, serving in several positions of public trust, and having the name of filling such offices to the perfect satisfaction of the people. He was colonel of the Virginia militia.

The children of John Argabrite were as follows:
Jacob Hockman Argabrite, born March 20, 1821, and died November 30, 1899. He never married and lived with his brother, James M., in the old home, of which he was part owner. He was a Confederate soldier, serving in the Greenbrier Cavalry. and fought in the battle of Droop Mountain.

Susan Argabrite, born February 8. 1824: died May 21. 1906. She married James Johnson, and lived at Johnson's Cross Roads, Monroe county.

Phares G. Argabrite, born April 26, 1826; died in 1861. He married Rosanah Jarrett. daughter of James Jarrett, of Greenbrier County, and lived in his home on Muddy creek, Greenbrier county. Mr. Argabrite was a soldier in the Confederate army and his command was stationed at Greenbrier river bridge. Here he contracted the measles and was compelled to return home, only to find his family down with diphtheria. This he also contracted. and the combined diseases caused his death, in the first year of the Civil war. His wife and three sons survived him.

Harvey Argabrite, born 1826, and died 1836.

Abrilla Argabrite, born 1830, lived three months.

John F. Argabrite, born March 16, 1831, lived with his father until he entered the medical college at Cincinnati, where he died on December 14, 1852.

George B. Argabrite and Mary M. Argabrite, twins, born July 11, 1834. George lived with his father until his death, January 15, 1854. Mary married Caleb Johnson and lived at Johnson's Cross Roads, Monroe county.

James H. Argabrite, born in 1836, died in 1838.

Julia A. C. Argabrite, born August 31, 1838, married Joseph H. Bunger. Five daughters were born to this union. Since her husband's death Mrs. Bunger has lived with three of her daughters at Bunger's Mills, Greenbrier county. James Madison Argabrite, born May 17, 1840. (A sketch of whom is given below.) Salome B. Argabrite, born January 23, 1842, married Harrison H. Gwinn; lives on Lick creek, Summers county.

Fletcher D. Argabrite, born December 21, 1844, lived with his father until his death, April 23, 1862.

Alice M. Argabrite, born March 2, 1847, married Andrew Jarrett, grandson of James Jarrett, of Greenbrier county, and went to reside in Wisconsin, where she died, June 23, 1917.

Druilla Argabrite lived but a few months.

History of Greenbrier County
J. R. Cole
Lewisburg, WV 1917
p. 286-290
Submitted by Sandy Spradling: SSpradling@AOL.com

JAMES MADISON ARGABRITE.

James Madison Argabrite, a son of Colonel John Argabrite above mentioned, was born May 17, 1840, and lives where he was born, in his home on Muddy creek, in Blue Sulphur district, fomerly a part of the ancestral estate. In his youth (about eight-een years ago) he attended the Alleghany College, which stood at Blue Sulphur Springs. On February 1, 1864, he joined the Confederate army in Company K, Fourteenth Virginia Cavalry. He was captured on May 6th at Meadow Bluff by Captain Blazer's cavalry and taken prisoner to Charleston, where he was kept a month. He was then taken to Camp Chase Ohio, where he remained nine months. After this he was sent on exchange to Richmond, where he was given a furlough for thirty days. At the expiration of this leave of absence the war was over.

In November, 1867, he married Annie C. Anderson, daughter of Alexander H. Anderson, his neighbor, also a member of one of the oldest families in Greenbrier county. To this union were born: Jo, October 5, 1869; John Alexander, September 13, 1875; he died February 12, 1902; Mary Catherine, August 23, 1877; R. B., June 17, 1881; he died February 25, 1903; Otho Paul (the well known physician at Alderson), May 13, 1884, who married Mary Johnson Feamster, October 15, 1907; she died January 4, 1910. Two children were born to this union: Mary Catherine, November 25, 1908, and Lula Virginia, who died in infancy. Dr. Otho Argabrite married on November 6, 1911. Miss Clella Mottesheaca, of Charleston, W. Va.

J. M. Argabrite has devoted most of his time on his land to grain and stock raising. He was the first to introduce into Greenbrier county the pure bred Polled Angus cattle. He served six years as commissioner of Greenbrier county.

History of Greenbrier County
J. R. Cole
Lewisburg, WV 1917
p. 290-291
Submitted by Sandy Spradling: SSpradling@AOL.com

GEORGE TAYLOR ARGABRITE

George Taylor Argabrite, son of Phares G. Argabrite, was born in Greenbrier county, February 28, 1850. His youth was spent on the ancestral farm, which lies near Cline's Bridge, in Bhie Sulphur district, where he lived with his widowed mother and his brothers, John Riley and Jacob L. He came of sturdy, virile and brainy stock. In his veins courses the blood of Argabrites, Jarretts, Hockmans and Gwinns. In 1869 he went to Missouri and was brought in contact with the spirit of the West. When he returned from the West he attended Roanoke College and the West Virginia University. In 1871 he went into the newspaper business as a partner with B. F. Harlow, and they published the Greenbrier Independent for many years until in 1880, B. F. Harlow sold his interest to Thomas H. Deimis and the newspaper and publishing business was conducted by Dennis and Argabrite until 1910, when Mr. Argabrite sold his interest to his partner and went to live on his farm, about our mile west of the court house.

During the time Mr. Argabrite was engaged as joint editor and publisher of the Independent, his community, together with the entire State and country, went through great changes. Railroads, telephones, phonographs and automobiles, aeroplanes, wireless telegraphy, new methods of reducing metals, the replacing of wood by iron and steel and concrete, the introduction of machinery on the farm and many other new things came on the stage, and into common use. The patriotic situation in his State and the country changed and varied. New ideas, new philosophies, new legislation came on the scene and were adopted or rejected as the growth of the people required. His natural sense and strong mentality served to steer him safe through all these trying times. He was never carried away with "Issues," yet at the same time his mind stayed young and was always open to listen to new ideas and he had a fine factulty of distinguishing the truth from error. His newspaper established a reputation for sound morality and political stability that made it a power for good. He understood his business thoroughly, could set type, write leaders, manage the financial end and do anything needed to make a good, readable sheet, and made the business prosperous. His affiliation was with the Democratic party and he was ever staunch in his allegiance to the principles of that party as he saw them, but was never an unreasoning partisan and often by word and pen pointed out rocks ahead.

In 1880 he married Mollie M. Miller, a daughter of William G. Miller. To this union three children were born, William Graeme, George Phares and Rose Miller. Since 1910 he has lived on his farm, which is of great fertility, near the town of Lewisburg. Wherever a public question arose, he has been heard from, and, in my humble opinion, he has seen a light many of his neighbors did mot see. He believes in making this world a better place for men and women to live in. He realizes we must live for our children and has backed by earnest effort every step to advance with the growth of the world. He has a vast fund of useful knowledge, well digested.

History of Greenbrier County
J. R. Cole
Lewisburg, WV 1917
p. 291-293
Submitted by Sandy Spradling: SSpradling@AOL.com


Photo of Dr. Charles N. Austin submitted by Paul Huffman

CHARLES N. [Newton] AUSTIN, M. D. - was born in Augusta County, Virginia, March 16, 1832. His parents were both natives of that county, Alexander M. AUSTIN, born January 3, 1803, and Mary L. (HUNTER) AUSTIN, born October, 1808. At Jackson C. H., Jackson County, (then) Virginia, April 6, 1858, Dr. C. N. AUSTIN was united in marriage with Martha J. ARMSTRONG, who was born in Jackson County, January 13, 1839. Their children were nine, born: Mary K., December 30, 1858; Charles L., August 28, 1860; Virginia, June 6, 1865; James A., December 31, 1866; Annie R., December 19, 1868; Ernest L., January 20, 1871; Lyle A., April 1, 1874; Samuel C., January 10, 1878; Lorentz M., September 30, 1881. Charles L. is a practicing physician and makes his home in Pocahontas County, this State, and the other children are with their parents at Lewisburg. James ARMSTRONG, born in Preston County, (then) Virginia, died in Jackson County at the age of seventy-five years, was the father of Mrs. AUSTIN. Her mother, whose maiden name was Catharine WEAS, was born in Randolph County, now West Virginia. Charles N. AUSTIN was a graduate, class of 1856, from the Cleveland (Ohio) Medical College. During the war between the States he was in the Confederate service, first as lieutenant, then as surgeon. In 1864 he took up residence and entered into practice in Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, West Virginia, and that is still his residence and post office address.

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty's Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.
Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, 1998.

SAMUEL H. AUSTIN, M. D. - born in Augusta County, Virginia, March 18, 1840, took up residence in Greenbrier County in 1865. In the same year, on the 28th of June, in Lewisburg, he was united in marriage with Mary C. McPHERSON, and to them in the years that have ensued have been born seven children: Amanda J., April 28, 1866; Mary A., March 4, 1868; Addie L., July 9, 1871; Samuel Mc., July 11, 1873; Charlie V., October 4, 1875; Erle H., March 10, 1881; Hale B., December 14, 1882 - all are at home. The birth of Mrs. AUSTIN was in Lewisburg, and she is a daughter of Joel and Amanda (McCLUNG) McPHERSON. Her father was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, in October 1807, and came to Greenbrier County in 1828, and her mother was born in this county, July 4, 1808. The parents of Dr. AUSTIN were natives of Augusta County, Virginia, and are now residents in Harrison County, West Virginia. Alexander M. AUSTIN, his father, was born January 3, 1803, and his mother, whose maiden name was Mary L. HUNTER, was born in October, 1808. Samuel H. AUSTIN was four years in the Confederate army, the first two years as lieutenant in Company B, 22nd Virginia Infantry, and the last two as assistant surgeon of the 20th Virginia Cavalry. He was in the battle of Lewisburg, in May, 1862, and of Winchester, September 19, 1864, and others. He graduated in medicine from the Virginia Medical College in March, 1866, and has been practicing ever since. Since 1881 he has been United States examining surgeon at Lewisburg, and he is serving his second term of three years as school commissioner at Lewisburg, his place of residence and address.

Source: Hardesty, Henry H. Hardesty's Historical and Geographical
Encyclopedia. New York: H.H. Hardesty and Company, 1884.
Rpt. in West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Ed. Jim Comstock.
Richwood: Comstock, 1974.
Transcribed and submitted by Valerie Crook, 1998.

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