WWII Military Service News


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Cpl. Olin Shutts, a son of Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Shutts of Rockland, Ohio.

Edward R. Webb is a son of Mrs. E. M. Casto, of Fairplain. He was wounded in the fighting in the Solomon Islands several months ago and has been given a medical discharge and is now at home.

Junior A. Barker, a son of Mrs. E. M. Casto, of Fairplain, is stationed in Alaska. (Friday, April 21, 1944).

Private James William Price died at an Army Base hospital at the Italian front on March 2 as a result of wounds received in action, according to information from the War Department which has been received by his grandfather, J.W. Harvey, of Sandyville. Pvt. Price had served in the Army since March 5, 1943, and received his basic training at Fort McClellan, Alabama. He was later sent to Camp Shelby, Mississippi after which he was transferred to the east coast for overseas duty. The family lived at Crow Summit for a number of years but prior to the young man's entry into the service he had been employed at an airplane manufacturing plant in Baltimore. Only July 23 of last year he married Miss Ada Rose Pryor, of Wood county, who with an infant daughter, Trudy Dianne, survives. Other survivors include his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Price and the following brothers and sisters, Paul Price of Stockport, Ohio, Mrs. Ellen Phillips of Atwater, Ohio and Mrs. Ruth Howard, of Birmingham, Alabama. Also a grandfather, Mr. J.W. Hartley, of Sandyville, one nephew and two nieces. (Friday, April 28, 1944).

S/Sgt. Herman O. Carney, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Carney, of Staats Mills, WV.

Miss Ruth Lee Miller, the oldest daughter of Judge and Mrs. Lewis H. Miller, of Ripley, has enlisted in the WAVES and will report for duty at the end of the school year in June. She is a member of the faculty of the South Charleston High School. Judge Miller served in the Navy during the first World War.

Pvt. Eugene Bennett has arrived safely overseas according to information received by members of his family. His wife, the former Miss Madge Montgomery, of Ripley, and his parents are Mr. and Mrs. Oda Bennett, of Odaville, WV.

Wendell McGrady, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ories McGrady, of Ripley, has been promoted to Petty Officer, second class, according to an announcement this week. He is serving in the Navy and has been in England for some time. (Friday, April 28, 1944),

Lt. William Harold Sheppard arrived in Ripley Saturday from India. Lt. Sheppard has been overseas twenty-one months. For fifteen months he had been on active combat duty in Tunisia, Africa, Sicily, Italy and India. He has been awarded the Air Medal and four Oak Leaf clusters which means that he has taken part in 146 missions, He is also decorated with three ribbons indicating that he has been in three war theatres, Panama, Africa and India, and three stars for participating in three major battles in the American theatre. He was pilot of an Airocobra Fighter ship. He was two and a half days coming from India to the states in an airline ship. Following a 30 day leave spent at Ripley with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt Sheppard, he will report at Miami, Florida, for three months rest. Mrs. Maybelle Payne Sheppard will accompany him to Florida. (Friday, May 5, 1944)

The War Department has notified Mr. and Mrs. Uriah J. Gandee, of Kenna, that their son, Harold Gandee, is missing in action following a bombing raid over Nazi held territories in Europe from which his plane failed to return. The young flier was a gunner on a Flying Fortress and had been participating in the bombing mission over Germany territory for some time. He had been overseas with the Army Air Corps for several months in the European theatre of the war. He is one of two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Gandee who are serving their country in this war, the other being Howard Gandee, who is with the Marines in the South Pacific. The parents were promised by the War Department more information, if and when it is available, and the family and the young flier's many friends cling to the hope that possibly he was able to parachute to earth after his plane was shot down and that he may be a prisoner of war. (Friday. May 5, 1944),

Staff Sergeant Jonathan A. Casto, 24 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. H, Casto, of Rockcastle, WV. (Friday, May 5, 1944)

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Guy Fisher has received word that his only sister, Miss Rowena Fisher has been sworn into the women's auxiliary of the Marine Corps. Sgt. Darrell Fisher has been in England for ten months. Guy Fisher has passed his physical examination and is now awaiting his call to active duty. They are the children of Mr and Mrs. S. E. Fisher, of Huntington, WV.

Cpl. Don Myers, a son of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Myers, of Ripley, has received a certificate of proficiency from the Army's Chemical Warfare school at Fort Custer, Michigan, and is now qualified non-commissioned Unit Gas Officer. He made a grade of 97% in the course given.

Pfc. Ottie Oldham, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Oldham, of Evans, is spending a furlough with the family, having arrived back in this country only a short time ago from the European theatre of the war. He was wounded in Africa and was awarded the Purple Heart but has now recovered from his wounds received. (Friday, May 5, 1944)

While many people were making inquiry into results of the primary election today, in two Jackson County homes there was sorrow because of news received from the War Department that sons from those homes had been added to the casualty lists. Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Bonnett, of North Ravenswood, received a message that their son, Charles Lester Bonnett, had been killed in Florida, and Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Clendenin, of Kenna received a message from the War Department that their son, Jarrell Clendenin was missing in action in India. Young Bonnett was an Aviation Machinist's Mate, first class and was stationed at the Auxiliary Naval Air Field at Green Coves, near Jacksonville, Florida. He was killed at 3:15 Tuesday morning, according to the message received and his body is being sent home for burial and a military funeral is being planned but the day and hour has not been fixed, according to reports from Ravenswood this morning. He was a graduate of the Ravenswood High School and had been in the service for some time. The Clendenin youth had been serving in the Army Air Force in India for some time. The message received did not give any details beyond the fact that he was missing and promised more details and further information if such was obtained. The youth leaves a young widow, who lives at Kenna, his parents and many other relatives, including a sister who is a student at Ripley High School. (Friday, May 12, 1944).

The War Department has announced that the Air Medal has been awarded to Sgt. Clair E. Kessel for "meritorious service" in the battle zone in the South Pacific. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Kessel, of Parchment, and has been serving overseas in the South Pacific area for many months. The award to the young man was made last month. "The awards were made" the citation read, for "meritorious achievement while participating in sustained operational flight missions in the southwest Pacific area, during which hostile contact was probable and expected. The operations consisted of long range bombing missions against enemy airdromes and installations and attacks on enemy naval vessels and shipping. The courage and devotion to duty displayed during these flights are worthy of commendation.” (Friday, May 12, 1944)

Sgt. Marvin G. Davis, stationed in the Libyan Desert, is the brother of Leona Davis, of Liverpool, WV, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. G.B. Davis, of Liverpool, Another son of Mrs. Davis, Sgt. Basil G. Davis, left the west coast several months ago.

Pvt. Warren Cunningham. who is with the Army overseas, is the son of Mrs. O. J. Cunningham, of Ripley.

Pvt. Kenneth Bonnett, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Bonnett, of Liberty, recently came home from Camp Adair, Oregon to spend a furlough with his parents. He has a brother, Guention Bonnett, who is with the Army in New Guinea where he has been for more than a year.

Pfc. Clyde L. Wheeler, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Wheeler, of Mt, Alto, WV.

Cpl. John Hall, a son, of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Hall, of Sidneyville, WV

Petty Officer, 2/c, Jake Fisher, who is stationed at Whiting Field, Milton, Florida, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Fisher, of Ripley.

Sgt. Lansing Williams, U. S. Marine Corps, son of Mrs. Nora Williams.

S/Sgt. Claude Camden Casto, who is stationed at Bowman Field, Ky, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. N. Casto, of Ripley.

Warren Alderman, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Jasper F, Alderman, of Fletcher, is serving with the Army Engineers. He entered the service last September and is stationed in California.

Pfc. Ronald O. Ferguson of the Marines has returned to Cherry Point, N. C. after spending a few days here with his mother, Mrs. Vena Ferguson and other relatives. Another son, Gerald Ferguson, who is serving in the Navy and stationed at Sampson, N. Y,. has been visiting here with his wife and other relatives. (Friday, May 12, 1944)

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Eugene Hood, who enlisted in the Navy and left on April 28, is now at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station in Illinois. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clerc Hood, of Ripley.

William Cecil Moore, U. S. Navy, the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Moore, of Silverton, WV.

Mrs. Frances Mitchell, who enlisted in the Womans Army Corps several weeks ago, has been called to service and has reported for duty at Ft. Des Moines, Iowa. Her husband, Pvt. Clarence Mitchell is with the Army overseas.

S/Sgt. Lloyd G. Moore is serving in the Army in Italy, and his brother, Chester H. Moore, with the pt, S, Navy and is somewhere in the Hawaiian Islands, both the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Kerman Moore, of Ravenswood WV.

Pvt. Everett Shaffer, of Kenna, is serving with the Army Combat Engineers and has recently been on maneuvers in Tennessee.

Ft. Benning, Ga.: Pvt. Donald Rhodes son of Mr. and Mrs. E, C. Rhodes, of Belgrove, Rt., Ripley, WV, has won the right to wear Wings and Boots of the United States Paratroopers. He has completed four weeks of jump training during which he made five jumps from a plane in flight, the last a technical jump at night involving a combat problem on landing.

Two children of S. Z. Baker, of Ravenswood, are serving in the armed forces of their country. Rex Baker is serving in the Navy in the South Pacific and Roxa Nell Baker, is a Technician in the WAC and is stationed in Africa.

Sgt. Darrell Stone, son of Mr. and Mrs. Oren B. Stone, of Ripley, has been awarded the Purple Heart as a result of his fighting with the Army in the campaigns in Africa and Sicily. He was with the first forces who landed in Africa in November 1942, and is now back in England, presumably to play a part in the big invasion.

Fort Benning, Ga.: Cpl. Charles F. Rollins, husband of Mrs. Thelma Pauline Rollins of Rt. 1, Box 6, Liberty, WV., has won the right to wear Wings and Boots of the United States Army Paratroopers. He has completed four weeks of jump training during which he made five jumps from a plane in flight, the last tactical jump at night involving a combat problem onlanding. (Friday, May 12, 1944)

Funeral services for two sailors from this area who enlisted in the Navy in Parkersburg the same day more than two years ago and from that time on were together through service in Trinidad and many other places and who met death on Tuesday morning of last week at the same time at an auxiliary naval air field a short distance from Jacksonville, Florida, were held over the weekend. The two young men were Charles Lester Bonnett, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Bonnett, of North Ravenswood, and Robert Bush, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dorsey Bush, formerly of Mt. Alto but who are now living at Rockport. The bodies arrived home for burial Friday and the funeral services for Bonnett were held Saturday afternoon at Ravenswood at two o'clock with burial in the Ravenswood cemetery and funeral services for Bush were held at the Limestone church on the Ripley-Parkersburg road Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. The Bush family attended the funeral services for Bonnett in Ravenswood on Saturday afternoon and the Bonnett family attended the Bush funeral at Limestone on Sunday afternoon. Complete details of the accident in which the two young men met death together have not yet been given members of the family but it is known that in some manner they were killed in an automobile accident. More than two years ago the two young men met for the first time in the Navy recruiting office at Parkersburg where they each had gone to enlist. Both passed their examinations and left at the same time and from that day until the hour of their death were never separated although each saw several months of foreign service. It was learned this week that six sailors in all were killed in the crash of the automobile in which all were returning from downtown Jacksonville to their base about three o'clock in the morning of May 9. All were killed instantly. All six had returned from overseas duty. The .automobile crashed into a brick building, according to the facts learned in connection with the case. Shannon Harris, a sailor from Washington, was the official escort for Bonnett's body and remained in Ravenswood until after the funeral. Six fellow sailors were pallbearers. (Friday, May 19, 1944),

Pvt. John P. Hunt, son of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Hunt, now of Akron, but formerly of Ravenswood, has arrived safely with the troops in England. He is serving in the Parachute Infantry and received his training at Ft. Benning, Ga., where he received his silver wings. He entered the service in December 1942.

Daniel Clerc Rhodes, seaman second class, has completed his boot training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station and now has been assigned to active duty with the Navy. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Rhodes, of Ripley. (Friday, May 19, 1944)

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Pvt. Luther Oshe, son of Mrs. Ida Oshe, of Cottageville, has sent the Purple Heart which he was awarded for being wounded in the Mediterranean theatre of operations to his mother. He was wounded during the fighting in Sicily. Pvt. Oshe has recovered from his wounds and is back at the front again.

Pvt. Noble Lanham is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Lanham, of Sissonville. He is serving in the Army and is with the forces in England and probably will be among the invasion troops expected to swing into action soon.

H. W. "Bill" Slaven, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Slaven, has been promoted to the rank of Corporal in the Marines. He was with the Marine force that landed in the Marshall Islands some time ago and is still in that area.

Pvt. Jackson M. Hall, whose wife, Mrs. Mamie C. Hall, is a resident of Ripley, has been assigned to the Army Service Forces Training Center, at Camp Plauche, La., for basic training. Before entering the service, Pvt. Hall was a school bus driver,

Lucian M, Flesher has returned to the naval base at Milton, Florida after spending a furlough here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Flesher.

James Rhodes, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L, Rhodes, of Ripley, and has been serving in the Navy for the past three years and at present is somewhere in the South Pacific with the Fleet.

Edwin Reynolds, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.N. Reynolds, of Ripley, is one of the many young men who have answered the call to serve their country. He is serving in the Navy and has already seen several months service.

Dorsel Barnett, a son, of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Barnett, of Liberty, is one of the many young men from this section who are wearing the blue jacket of the Navy in the present war. He has been in the service for some time and is now on active duty. (Friday, May 19, 1944)

Word has been received by Sumpter Archer, teacher of Sandyville, that his nephew, Lt. Travis Wells, who had earlier been reported as missing, was killed in action in the South Pacific war zone last January 6. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Wells, live at Richwood, Ohio, and were former residents of the Sandyville community. Lt. Wells had been serving in the Army Air Corps for more than two years and some weeks ago the members of the family received notification from the War Department that the young man was missing in action. No further news had been received until this week when the message came that it had now been definitely established that he was killed in action when his plane was shot down over Jap territory while he was on a bombing mission. After the report was received that he was missing in action relatives had hoped that the plane might have been forced down in the jungles and that he might make his way to safety as many other fliers have done in that theatre of the war. The message received this week, however, dashed those hopes and his name is now inscribed with those who have given their lives in the present war. Included among the relatives in Sandyville community are the two uncles, Sumpter and John Archer. (Friday, May 26, 1944).

A letter from Pvt. Clarence Russell Ray, a prisoner of war in Germany, has been received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Kay, of Rockcstle, and the mother has received a card recently in addition to the letter.

Cpl. Bernard M. Wolfe, son of Mrs. Erva D. Wolfe, of Given was graduated last week from the Army Air Forces Flexible Gunnery School, Buckingham Army Air Field, Ft. Myers. Florida.

Clair Kittle, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kittle, of Parkersburg who has been with the U. S. Navy Seebees for the past two years and has seen service in the Aleutian Islands for the past 17 months is spending a 30 day furlough with his wife, Mrs. Rena Chancey Kittle and son and also friends at Lockhart.

S 1/c Claude C. Kittle and S 1/c Tracy C. Kittle, sons of Mrs. C. L. Kittle of Sandyville Rt. 1, have completed their boot training at Camp Bainridge, Maryland, and arrived home Tuesday morning for a 9 day furlough with the families, Mrs. Zora Kittle and two children and Mrs. Ireta Kittle and two children and their mother and other relatives. (Friday, May 26, 1944)

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A Ninth Air Force Mustang Base, England: Carl Monday, son of Mrs. Ethel Monday, of Kenna, WV, has recently been promoted from Sargeant to Staff Sargeant, thus adding another stripe to the sleeve of his uniform. Sgt. Monday is a Ninth Air Force aircraft mechanic who maintains in perfect flying condition the P-51 Mustangs of his organization that have been regularly taking part in long range missions to targets in Germany and occupied Europe. A graduate of Ripley High School, Monday took a course in welding at the Virginia School of Welding, Charleston, WV, and was employed as a combination welder at the Marietta Mgf. Co., Point Pleasant, WV., until enlisting in the service at Ft. Thomas in August 1942. He received his basic training at Ft. Thomas, Kentucky and later attended air craft mechanics school at Lincoln, Nebraska, and Niagra Fails, N.Y., before joining his present organization on the west coast. Carl, a popular fellow with the boys in the squadron, hears his name called cut for more than one reason these days. Many times he has saved this buddies embarrassment at surprise inspections by giving them a last minute haircut. (Friday, May 26, 1944).

S/Sgt. Herald O. Thomas who has been in the U.S. Army since April 11, 1941 and has been stationed in the Panama Canal Zone for the past 28 months is spending a 30-day furlough with his wife, Mrs. Ida Belle Kibble Thomas and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Thomas and other relatives. He will return to Panama at the end of his furlough. (Friday, May 26, 1944)

How a Mt. Alto youth narrowly escaped death when his bombing plane went out of control and crashed while on a mission over German territory was told this week in a letter received by the parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Click, who are living at the present time in Parkersburg, and which brought back by the young man's captain who returned home and was then mailed to the parents. He is now on the island of Corscia in the Mediterranean. The event which he describes in the letter happened last February 13 and he was listed as wounded in action. He is a Staff Sergeant. His letter is as follows: "Dear Mother: I will write you a few lines, Captain Gellman is going home tomorrow and I will send the letter by him. He was my navigator coming over and Lt. O'Toole is coming home also. He was my co-pilot. I will tell you about my experience when I was injured. When we were sent over the target we got a direct hit in the bomb bay. The gas line caught fire and our hydraulic system was shot out so there was no way to put out the fire with our bomb bay doors open and the rear hatch wouldn't come all the way out and I got stuck in it. The heat melted the aluminum but I was held fast. My face, arms and hands were burned. Everybody but me left the ship, and I was held fast. The bomber finally went out of control and as it turned over and over somehow I was thrown out. I still knew enough to pull my parachute and lucky for me it opened and I landed in the sea. A PT boat picked me up about an hour and a half later. It hurt considerable for a week and then I was o.k. My face was dark for a couple of months but it has all cleared up now and I am o.k. Don't worry, Love, Delbert" (Friday, May 26, 1944)

Two Jackson County, West Virginia, men are receiving their initial naval indoctrination at the U.S. Naval Training Station at Great Lakes, Illinois. Their recruit training completed these men will spend a period of leave at home, They are: Warren H. Miller, 23, husband of Liddie Rosalie Miller, of Fletcher (son of Eli and Mary Miller); and Eugene F. Hood, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clare E. Hood, Box 149, Ripley. (Friday, May 26, 1944)

S/Sgt. Jonathan A. Casto, 24, of Rockcastle, WV, serving in an Eight AAF Bomber Station, England, the son of Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Casto, of Rt. 1. Rockcastle, WV.

Pfc. Carl Corns, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Corns, of Lockhart, WV. Pfc. Corns is stationed at Kessler Field, Miss.

Miss Anita Vannoy, A.A. 21c, stationed at Bethesda, Maryland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Vannoy.

Seaman 1/c Claude C. Kittle and Tracy C. Kittle from Camp Bainbridge, Md., sons of Mrs. C. L. Kittle, of Lockhart, WV.

S/Sgt. Herold O. Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Thomas, his first trip home in 28 months. He has been stationed at Canal Zone and took him 14 days to make the trip home.

Clair Kittle, a Navy boy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kittle, formerly of Lockhart, now of Parkersburg, WV.

James W. Waybright, a son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H, Waybright, is serving in the Pacific war zone where he has been stationed for many months and has saw battle action at close range in our westward march toward Japan. He has a brother, Wayne, who is with the Army in England. (Friday, May 26, 1944)

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Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Tolley, of Gay, have three sons and a son-in-law serving in the armed forces at the present time. They are: Junior Tolley, Seaman 1/c serving with the Atlantic Fleet, Garland Tolley, Seaman 2/c with the Navy in European waters, Carl W. Comer, with the Army in the Hawaiian Islands, and Pvt. Sterling Tolley with the Fifth Army in Italy.

Pvt. Gaylord Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Smith, of Garfield, who has been in the U. S, service since December 5, 194 3, going to Fort Thomas for two weeks, then was sent to Camp Shelby, Miss. His wife is the former Miss Myrtle Nuzum.

Wayne Tolley, a son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E, Tolley, has been serving in the Army for about two years and is one of the many men who are now in England awaiting word which will begin the invasion.

Pvt. Charles Basil Barr recently visited relatives at Rockcastle and returned to his training base in Arkansas. He is a son of Mrs. Flora Barr Casto, and has a brother, Dale, who is serving in the Navy and is somewhere in the Pacific.

Dewey Barr, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Barr, Sr., of Parkersburg and a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Casto, of Ripley RFD 2, is serving in the Navy and for some time has been stationed in Washington.

Cleo H. Wandling, a Chief Petty Officer in the Navy, has recently returned from service in the tropics after which he enjoyed a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H, F. Wandling, of Given, before returning to overseas duty with the fleet. (Friday, May 26, 1944).

The last issue of the Herald brought glad news to a Jackson County mother and an aged grandfather about a young man whom they had not heard from since last January, and each day they had feared that the news might be received that the young man, who was known to be overseas, might have met with misfortune, since he had been attached to the Army Air Corps for a long time and that branch of the service has been particularly active for many months. He is Carl Monday, a son of Mrs. Ethel Duff Monday, of Kenna, and a grandson of M. L. Duff, well known farmer and livestock dealer in that section of the county. For weeks they had hoped for some news but for some reason unknown at this time, no mail from the young man had ever gotten through and they in turn did not know where to write him. Last week the mother was reading her copy of the Herald as usual, when she came upon a news article received from an air base in England, which told of Monday's activities even to his hobby when off duty of cutting the hair of members of his squadron. Since the news dispatch had been received only eight days after it had been written, it means that Carl Monday was still alive and he was well and on active duty. The news was soon relayed by the mother to other members of the family, some of whom were out in the fields working at the time, but she took them the good news, and Mr. Duff, who came to Ripley to checkup on how his home paper had secured the story, and that "this issue" of the Herald has brought more joy in my home than any paper which he had ever received there, in fact anything which has happened in many, many years. (Friday, June, 2, 1944)

Captain John A. Shinn has arrived safely at a port in England according to a message received by relatives here. He enlisted in the Army about two years ago and has been serving in the Medical Corps. He is a son of the late J. A. Shinn and Mrs. Shinn, and is a brother to Mrs. J. Howard Smith, Mrs. Georgia Ellison and Allen Shinn, of Ripley. In private life he is a dentist and practiced his profession in Pt. Pleasant for a number of years before entering the service.

Warren Dallas Raines is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Hollie Raines, of Kenna. He is one of the many young men who is serving in the Navy and sailing and fighting on the seven seas.

Olan Dale Smith, Seaman l/c, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. T.O. Smith, of Sandyville. He has been in the service for more than a year and is somewhere overseas at the present time. (Friday, June 2, 1944).

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War with all its evils and sorrow has visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cleve C. Bailey who lives in Putnam County but close to Jackson County line last Monday when a special telegram was delivered from Winfield stating that his son, Arnold A. Bailey had been missing since May 5th. The telegram also stated that a letter would follow stating the particulars. It is yet to be hoped that the young Sergeant is alive and not dead. Arnold A. Bailey enlisted in the Air Corps in November, 1942 and has seen lots of service on the battle front. He was an upper turret gunner and a co-pilot and following his training in the United States he went with his division to Brazil and from there to North Africa and took part in winning that section from the Germans. He then was sent to Naples and from Naples he had took part in a number of flying missions over German territory. His last letter to his parents in which he spoke of what he was doing was April 19th. In that letter he mentioned he had been on eight missions over Germany. He did not tell how many times he had been on missions over the enemy territory, Italy and North Africa, He wrote two letters home since the one mentioned, The last one was May 1st and the telegram received Monday stated that he had been missing since May 5th. Sergeant Arnold A. Monday graduated from Ripley High School in the spring of 1942 and the following November he enlisted to do his part for his country and it looks like he has done his part and it is hoped he is still alive, not dead. but missing. He has an older brother that enlisted five years ago and he is also in the Air Corps. But the brother, Harold Bailey has completed his mission in the air and is a personnel man in an office. The parents of these two young soldiers are well known in the southern part of Jackson county. Mrs. Bailey is a daughter of C.F. Hill, Liberty, WV. (Friday, June 2, 1944)

Earl D. Randolph, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Oley Randolph, of Ripley Rt 2, is receiving his initial naval indoctrination at the U. S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois.

Roy H. Fisher, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Fisher, of Liberty, is one of the many thousands of young men who is serving in Uncle Sam's Navy at the present time. (Friday, June 2, 1944).

Miss Juniata Vineyard has offered her services to her government and the Allied cause for freedom and mankind by joining the Marines. Miss Vineyard went to Charleston Tuesday, was examined and sworn in and within the next few weeks will be called upon to go to a training camp in North Carolina where she will be given her training. Miss Vineyard is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. C.W. Vineyard. She has been engaged in the teaching profession for several years and this past winter she was principal of the Cottageville High School and could have gone on with her teaching but she chose to give her services to her government in the way of becoming a Marine, So far as the writer knows and it is most certain he is right, Miss Vineyard is the only woman of Jackson County to become a Marine.

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Blankenship, of Rockcastle, WV, have five sons serving in the armed forces. They are: Travis, training in North Carolina, Dayton, training in South Carolina, Clarence Leonard, training in Oregon, Clayton, serving in the Southwest Pacific from whom nothing has been heard since January, and Layton, who is serving in the Car ribean area,

Cpl. George H. Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Smith, of Ravenswood RFD, who has been serving overseas for the past twenty months, has recently been awarded the Army's Good Conduct medal for excellent character and efficient service as a heavy truck driver.

Pfc. Early Ottie Postall, a brother of Miss Tillie Postal, of Ripley, entered the Army on March 10, 1942. He is stationed at Waycross, Georgia. (Friday, June 2, 1944).

First Lt. Oshel Frederick Staats, 23, bombardier on an Eightth Air Force Flying Fortress stationed in England, has received the Distinguished Flying Cross for "extra-ordinary achievement" while participating in more than a score of heavy bombing raids on Germany and occupied countries, the war Department announced last Saturday. Lt. Staats is a veteran of some of the most important heavy bombing attacks carried out in recent months by the Eighth Air Force, including missions against naval and shipping facilities at Kiel, a German Messerschmitt factory at Regensburg and objectives in Bremen, Frankfort and Augsburg. He is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Oshel C. Staats, of Ripley, and is the first Ripley youth to be awarded the DFC during the present war. He completed his training at the Army bombardier school at San Antonio, Texas in February 1943 and went overseas soon thereafter, He is a graduate of Ripley High School and was attending West Virginia Institute of Technology at Montgomery when he enlisted in the service. News of the decoration was received by newspapers in Ripley last Friday but was not released for publication until Saturday. It had been known for some time that he had been in active service. (Friday, June 9, 1944)

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S/Sgt. Herman O. Carney, son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Carney, of Ripley, has been awarded the Air Medal while serving as a A-20 turret gunner in England. A veteran of 29 9th Air Force combat missions over Nazi-held Europe, S/Sgt. Carney, formerly attended Ripley High School. Prior to entering the service he was employed as a truck driver.

Sgt. James Campbell, of Ripley and Sandyville, who is serving in the United States Air Corps in England is shown with his company in the issue of Life Magazine on June 5th. The picture has created considerable interest locally and was picked out in the group by relatives who knew of other members of his group and noticed that they were in the picture. (Friday, June 9, 1944)

Mr. and Mrs. James Williamson, of Murraysville, have received a picture of the grave of their son, Lt. James Williamson, Jr., who was killed early in the war on Guadalcanal in the southwest Pacific. The picture was sent them by a man who knew their son well and served with him. An uncle of the young Lieut. has also written the parents that his military duties have taken him to that section of the world and that he had visited the cemetery and taken a picture of the grave which he is sending to them but it had not arrived Friday, according to the father who was a business visitor in Ripley that day.

Italy: Arthur L. Parsons, of Duncan, WV, has been promoted to the rank of Staff Sergeant from Sergeant. Staff Sergeant Arthur L. Parsons is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Parsons, of Duncan, West Virginia. S/Sgt. Parsons has been a member of the United States Army since April 3, 1942 and is now a member of the XV Air Force Service Command. A gas field worker in civilian life, he is now serving a Service Squadron on the XV Air Force Command as Mess.Sergeant.

Cpl. Wilbert C. Angus is a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Angus, of Rockport, has been in the Army for about a year and at the present time is stationed at Howe, Texas. He recently spent a furlough with his parents and his sisters, Mrs. Virginia Thompson, of Parkersburg, Mrs. Ethel Boggess, of Ravenswood and Mrs. Opal Carson, of Rockport.

Norfolk, Va., June 7 : Pvt. Ronald O. Ferguson, Marine Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Ferguson, of Ripley, WV, was in the latest group of trainees graduated from the Naval training Center, according to personnel data received by the Fifth Naval District here today. Former student of Ripley High School, he enlisted in Charleston last July. He entered the Norman Training Center December 19, and took the course of aviation ordnance.

Norfolk, Va.: Laura Alice Kyger, Seaman 2/c in the Women’s Reserve of the Navy, has been assigned duty in Washington, D.C., and is living there in WAVE Quarters "D", according to personnel data received by the Fifth Naval District here today. Seaman Kyger is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Kyger, of Ravenswood, Jackson County, WV. She enlisted last March 17, and took her recruit training at Hunter College Annex, the Bronx, New York City.

Edwin P. Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. V. L. Fisher, of Fairplain, graduated from the Army Air Forces Flying School at Randolph Field, Texas, last week. His classification is fighter pilot.

Lakehurst, N.J.: The first class of WAVES ever to be trained as Navy "pigeonmen" was graduated at this naval lighter-than-air training and operating base today, upon completion of six months of training at the Pigeonmen Personnel Training School. Included in the graduating class was Virginia Thomas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler J. Thomas, of Evans, who joined the WAVES last Sept 7.

A Ninth Air Force Bomber Base, England: S/Sgt. Herman O. Carney, son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Carney, of Ripley, WV., has been awarded the Air Medal while serving as an A-20 turret gunner in the European Theatre of Operations. A veteran of the Ninth Air Force combat mission over Nazi held Europe, S/Sgt. Carney formerly attended Ripley High School. Prior to his Army service, he was employed as a truck driver.

An Air Service Command Station, Somewhere in England: Pfc. James W. Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. V. L. Fisher, of Fairplain, WV., is a supply clerk.

Bruce Lockhart, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Lockhart, of Sandyville, has been recently transferred from the Army Specialized Training Program to the Infantry, and is now stationed at Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky. (Friday, June 9, 1944)

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The Distinguished Service Cross the nation’s second highest military honor, was awarded on May 25 to Private First Class William Ray Andrick of the Infantry in the United States Army for extraordinary heroism in the battle of Hill 700 at Bourganville in the Solomon Islands on March 12, 1944, it was announced Thursday by Lt. Gen. Millard F. Harmon, commanding the forces in the South Pacific. The citation states: "After advancing up the steep slope to within 15 yards of the enemy occupied hilltop, Private Andrick ran out into the path of the most intense enemy fire and made a direct frontal assault on a pillbox, firing his automatic rifle from the hip as he closed in on the fortification. Standing in the entrance with a comrade, he poured a steady stream of devastating fire into the pillbox. Although he received multiple wounds from the uninterrupted bursts of enemy fire and grenades, he displayed are absolute unconcern for his personal safety and stood his ground firing relentlessly until all the Japanese occupying the key position were eliminated. Private Andrick's exceptional bravery and conspicuous courage inspired a fierce aggressive spirit in his platoon, adding momentum to an attack in which the Japanese forces were defeated." Pfc. Andrick is a son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Andrick, of Sandyville, and was among the first of the Infantry troops in the South Pacific battle zone. (Friday, June 19, 1944).

Charles Parsons, of Given, has been awarded the Purple Heart by the Army, according to an announcement this week. He was wounded in the Battle of Tunisia and is now with the American army marching north to Rome, having recovered from the wounds. He was the first Jackson County man to be called into service after the draft law was enacted and left here early in 1941 and has already saw more than three years of service. (Friday, June 16, 1944)

Arnold Bailey, reported missing in action while on a bombing mission over German territory on May 5, is a prisoner of war in Rumania, according to a message received here Friday by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Bailey, of Liberty. The message came from the War Department in the form of a telegram and further information was promised in a letter which was to follow from the Provost Marshall. The message ended a period of anxiety for the parents who had hoped that their son had landed his plane and was taken prisoner when they received the message that he was missing. The message received was as follows: "Report just received through International Red Cross states that your son, S/Sgt. Arnold A. Bailey, is a prisoner of war of the Rumanian government. Letter of information follows from Provost Marshall General." At the time his plane was forced drow it is believed that young Bailey was nearing the end of the required number of missions. Operating from Italian bases he had flown eight missions last April 19 and was flying about one a day at that time, according to the parents. On May 25th they received the message that he had been missing in action since May 5th. He graduated from the Ripley High School in the class of 1941 and enlisted in the Army Air Corps about two years ago. He has been overseas about five months. He was serving as top turret gunner and co-pilot on a heavy Fortress. He has a brother, T/Sgt. Harold Bailey, who has been in Australia and New Guinea for more than two and one-half years and who scheduled a leave there on the way home about June 22. He has been a personnel officer during the time he has served overseas. (Friday, June 16, 1944).

Bernard Wolfe, who is serving in the Army Air Forces, is spending this week with his mother, Mrs. Erva Wolfe, of Given. His brother, Hilton Wolfe, is a paratrooper with the invasion forces.

Lucian M. Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Fisher, of Ripley, has recently returned to his naval air station in Florida, after spending a furlough with the relatives here.

One of the early Monday morning bond buyers was Mrs. Wilma E. Jones, of Staats Mills, the wife of Pvt. Junior B. Jones, who has been in England with the Army Air Forces since 1st October.

Sgt. Belmont S. Crum, of Cottageville, has been awarded the Army’s Good conduct medal, according to an announcement received by the Herald this week from the Headquarters of the European Theatre of Operations.

Pvt. Kermit Somerville, who is with the 33rd General Hospital in Italy, is the son of Mrs. Clara Balderson, of Sonora, Rt, 1, Ohio.

Brady Carpenter, who is serving with the Army in Sardinia, is the son of Mrs. S. M. Carpenter, of Gay, WV. (Friday, June 16, 1944)

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The War Department has notified Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Clendenin, of Kenna, that their son, S/Sgt. Jarrell Clendenin, who was serving with the Army Air Forces in Italy, and missing since April 13, is a prisoner of war of the German government. He had arrived in England on March 10, and had flown several missions before his plane failed to return. In the message to the parents, the Department said: "Report just received thru International Red Cross that your son, S/Sgt. Jarrell A. Clendenin, is a prisoner of war of the German government. Lettter of information from Provost Marshall General follow." S/Sgt. Clendenin had been serving in the Air Force since his entry into the service and while at home on furlough last November married Miss Bethel Duff, of Sissonville. The young wife and his parents have had anxious weeks of waiting since they were notified that his plane had failed to return to base and had been hopeful that he had landed and had been taken prisoner. The telegram which came to them was joyful news, since it meant that the young man was still alive. The telegram was the second to be received in the community during the past few days, the other being to Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Bailey that their son, S/Sgt. Arnold A. Bailey, missing since in early May, was being held prisoner by the Rumanian government where his plane was forced down while on a bombing mission. (Friday, June 23, 1944)

Marvin Eugene Emerick, a son of Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Emerick, of Medina, is serving in Uncle Sam’s Navy and recently returned to New York after spending a vacation with the home folk. He is somewhere at sea. His brother, Floyd Emerick, was among the first of the county’s casualties in the war. (Friday, June 23, 1944).

The tragedy of war has struck in the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Boso, of Murraysville, for a second time with the receipt of a telegram from the War Department that their 29 year old son, Private Burhl Boso, was killed in action on the Italian front on May 2/. He had been reported missing earlier, but on Monday of this week they were notified that he had been killed, His younger brother, Sgt. Charles Boso, was also reported killed on the Italian front on Feb 6, 1944. The Boso family is the first family in Jackson County to lose two sons in this present war. Private Burhl Boso entered the service last Sept. 3 while the other brother was inducted into the service April 1, 1943. Both went overseas soon after completing their basic training. Besides the parents they leave their wives, Mrs. Burhl Boso of South Parkersburg and Mrs. Charley Boso of Ravenswood, the following brothers and sisters, Mrs. A. C. Swain, Mrs. W. E. Carder, both of Parkersburg, Mrs. C. W. Mills of East Liverpool, Ohio, Mrs. Cecil Whealdon of Belpre, Ohio, Rose Boso of Dayton, Ohio, Nora Medely of California, George Boso of Charleston, Melvin Boso of Washington, WV., Elmer Boso of Parkersburg, J. R. Boso, of Parkersburg, and Kins Boso, on his way to Arizona. (Friday, June 23, 1944).

Pvt. Cletis Wayne Sayre. son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Sayre, of Evans, WV.

Pvt. Donald Anthony, with the U. S. Army in Italy is the son of Mrs. Lula Anthony, of Ripley, WV.

Pvt. Alfred L. Casto, with the Army in England, is a brother to Miss Rosalie Casto, of Given, WV.

George Jordan, Jr., of the U.S. Navy, the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Jordan, Sr., of Ripley, WV. (Friday, June 30. 1944).

Eugene Carney, one of the three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Carney, who is serving in the Army, was with the invading forces who landed in France on June 6. In a letter to his parents rceived last Friday, he stated that he was alright and after six very tough days, was having it a little easier.

With The American Division at Bougainville: For his pref ormance on duty in action against the enemy on Bougainville, S/Sgt. Delbert D. Tuttle, of Gay, West Virginia, overseas 12 months, has been awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge. (Friday, July 7, 1944).

Mr. and Mrs. Ebb Crane, of Fairplain have received a letter from their son, Golden Crane, who was wounded in the fighting in New Guinea, is now improving and that the wounds were not of serious nature. He has been in the South Pacific for more than two years. (Friday, July 14, 1944).

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Telegrams have begun to arrive in Jackson County homes this week telling of casualties suffered among the boys of this county in the invasion of France. Up to press time none had been reported telling of deaths, but many parents report that they have not heard from their sons and bad news may naturally be expected in some cases where the list of casualties has been so high. Warren Alderman, son. of Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Alderman, of Ripley, who was with the invading troops, suffered severe wounds on June 14, according to a message which has been received by the parents (Warren survived), and John Paul Hunt, husband of Mrs. Joan Shinn Hunt, of Ripley, also suffered severe wounds and according to information received these consisted of a wound in the stomach and one leg. Both young men are now at base hospitals but there has been no further news on their condition. Two other Ripley men have been heard from, Eugene and Harold Carney, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Carney. Both were with the invading troops but both have written letters that they have came through the initial assault uninjured. Many others have not been heard from since invasion day, but they were known to be with units which were engaged in that operation. A number of parents in this section are anxiously awaiting news from the far west Pacific, where their sons are known to have been with the units invading the island of Saipan where U.S. casualties have already been more than 9,000. The second and fourth divisions of Marines are taking part in that operation and a number of young men from this section are attached to those divisions. Other parents who have received news from their sons this week include, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Casto, Rt. 2. Their son, Raymond, who is serving in the Navy, was attached to units of the fleet engaging in invasion operations. He wrote his parents, in a letter received Saturday, that he was uninjured. (Friday, July 7, 1944)

The War Department notified Mr. and Mrs. Ebb Crane, of Fairplain, in a message received last Saturday that their son, Golden Crane, had been wounded in action in the fighting in New Guinea on June 7. No further information concerning his condition has been received, but the message indicated that the wounds were such that he was expected to recover. Crane has been overseas in the southwest Pacific area of the war for many months, he being among the first of MacArthur's Southwest Pacific troops to land in that area when the General was planning his invasion of Jap held territory north of Australia. He was one among the early Jackson County boys to enlist in the service and after several months of training was sent overseas in the darkest days of the war and was with the troops in the Australian area who checked the Jap advance and has since gone on to engage in many battles in that area of the world and until June 7 had been lucky. More information concerning his condition is eagerly awaited by his parents, his relatives and his many friends. (Friday, July 7, 1944).

S/Sgt. Carl Stover, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Stover, of Cottageville, RFD, has been awarded the second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster for the Air Medal, according to an announcement from the Fifteenth Army Air Force Headquarters in Italy. In the words of the citation, Sgt. Stover was awarded this cluster "for meritorious achievement in sustained operational activities against the enemy." A top turret gunner, Sgt. Stover is stationed in Italy with a 15th AAF Liberator Bombardment Squadron which has been bombing Ploesti, Vienna, Steyr, Toulon and many other strategic targets in the framework of German industrial centers throughout southern Europe. He enlisted in the Army Air Force on Nov, 24th, 1942.

Jack W. Walker, son of Mr. and Mrs. W, E. Walker, of Ripley, has arrived safely in England, according to a letter received by the father this week which was written under the date July 1.

The Local Board No. 1 of Jacksoon County Selective Service is seeking the present address of the following registrants and are herein listing the names and last known address of such registrants: Golden Harold Cossin of Clifton, Donald Woodrow McIntyre of Salisbury, Md., Lios Gordon Hickman of Rt. 1, Box 39, Gay, Lloyd Earl Stover of Rt. 3, Box 278, Charleston, Joseph Herman Milam of Kenna, and Robert Camden Skeen of 1704 Kemp Ave., Charleston. Mrs. Lucille N. Short, clerk emphasis that it is the duty of each registrant to keep his local draft board advised at all times of his address and where mail will reach him. (Friday, July14,1944)

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Funeral services were held at ten o’clock Wednesday morning at the White Pine church near Belgrove for Pvt. Monnie C. Casto, 33 years old, who died at an Army hospital in Louisville. Ky., as a result of an attack of typhoid fever which he contracted within a few days after entering the service and burial was in the family plot in the cemetery there. Private Casto died on Sunday and the body arrived home Tuesday night. Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Leona Casto, and two children, Evelyn and Eugene, both at home; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Casto, of Belgrove, two sisters, Mrs. Oshel Whited and Mrs. Ethel Carpenter, both of Gay, and two brothers, Cecil Casto, of Belgrove, and Aley Casto, of Charleston. Private Casto was the third Jackson countian in this war to die of natural causes while serving his country, the other being Claude McPherson, son of Mr. and Mrs.Holly McPherson, of Medina, and the other being Cecil Kuhn, son of lag. and Mrs. M. J. Kuhn, of Ripley. (Friday, July 21, 1944).

The War Department has informed Mr. and Mrs. Orville Stover, of Cottageville, that their son, S/Sgt. Carl W. Stover, serving in the Army Air Force in the Italian theatre of the war, has been missing in action since June 26 when his bomber failed too return from a mission over Austria Hungarian territory. The story of his being awarded the second Oak Leaf Cluster appeared in the Herald last week. S/Sgt. Stover went overseas last December and has been with the Fifteenth Air Force in Italy for some time and served as a top turret gunner on a bomber. He entered the service Nov, 24, 1942. The Stover family has three sons in the service, the other being, Doyle Stover with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific and Dale Stover with the Army in England. The family clings to the hope that Sgt. Stover may have parachuted to safety when his plane was shot down and that he may be a prisoner of war in German territory. Further information, if any is available later, was promised by the War Department. (Friday, July 21, 1944)

Emil Nichols, of Ripley, fighting with the Marines on Saipan in the far west Pacific, has been wounded in action, according to a telegram received by his stepfather, Clifford S. Derey, of Ripley, The extent of his wounds are not yet known but the telegram stated that further details would be furnished the relatives when they were available. Nichols enlisted in the Marine Corps in April 1943 and has been overseas for several months and was also engaged in the fighting on the Marshall Islands in the late spring. The telegram received by Mr. Derey from the Commandant of the Marine Corps reads as follows: "Deeply regret to inform you that your stepson, Private First Class Emil A. Nichols, UCMC, has been wounded in action in the preformance of his duty and service of his country. I realize your great anxiety but nature of the wounds not reported and delay in receipt of details must be expected, You will be promptly furnished any additional information received." (Friday, July 21, 1944)

Pvt. Charles N. Boso, of Murraysville, is one of the young Jackson County boys who gave his life in the present war. He was killed on the Italian front and within a short time after his death, his brother, Burhl Boso, was also killed on the same front. They are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. G. N. Boso, of Murraysville. Charles leaves his parents and his young bride of only a few months, Mrs. Mildred Boso, of Ravenswood. (Friday, July 21, 1944).

Two soldier sons of Mrs. Ira Oshe, of Cottageville, have met in Italy and it was the first time they had seen each other in more than two years. Pvt. Luther Oshe learned front relatives at home that his brother, Cpl. Taft Oshe, was also in Italy and he went to the latter’s camp and looked him up and they spent some time together. (Friday, July 21, 1944)

Mrs. Jennie Thabet, of Point Pleasant, has received a message from the war Department advising that her son, Private Fay W. T habet,was killed in action in France on June 6 which was invasion day. He was a member of the 82nd Airborne Division. He is a brother of James M. Thabet of Ripley Five and Ten Cent Store. Private Thabet participated in the invasion of Sicily and was in the bloody battle of Salerno when Italy was invaded and was later transferred back to England in time to participate in the invasion of Normandy. He slept in the Naples postoffice the night before it was blown (up) by a bomb placed there by the retreating Germans. The last letter the mother received from him was dated May 24 and in it he told her he had already visited seven countries and there were two more, France and Germany, which he wanted to see before returning home. (Friday, July 21, 1944)

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S/Sgt. Jarrell Clendenin, son of Mr. and Mrs. S,.L. Clendenin, of Kenna, who was first reported missing after a bomber misson over German territory, is now definitely a war prisoner in Germany, acorrding to information made available through the Red Cross.

Edwin Wolfe, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.G. Wolfe, of Liverpool, has returned to duty in the Navy after spending a furlough with his parents. He has been stationed in the islands of the South Atlantic for more than a year. (Friday, July 21, 1944)

Friends here have received letters from Emil Nichols, wounded in the fighting on Saipan in the Pacific, that he is recovering and that his major injury was a broken leg. The letter was written from his hospital bed, which presumably was aboard a hospital ship, and he seemed cheerful and said the fighting had been going good in the theatre of war in which he had been assigned. He was awarded the Purple Heart on July 3, according to his letter, the award being made as a result of his fighting and being wounded in the battle with the Nips for control of the island. A telegram was received here last week by Nichol's stepfather, Clifford Derey, which was the first news that the young Marine had been wounded although it had been known that he was fighting on Saipan. (Friday, July 28, 1944)

Notification has been received by the relatives that Cpl. John B. Swecker has been wounded in the fighting in the Normandy battle zone of France and that after the wounds were treated for several days at a field hospital he has been evacuated to one of the base hospitals in England. Mr. Swecker before his entry into the service was a teacher of Vocational Agriculture at Ripley and Cottageville and he and many of the boys who were in his classes have been in the service for some time. His wife, the former Emogene Smith, of Sandyvilie, who is now with her parents, received a letter from him: this week in which he assures her that he is recovering from his wounds, and that his condition is now very much better. He is one of the three members of the Ripley High School faculity who are in the European battle Zone at the present time, the other two being Delmer Wade Kessel and Donald P. Brown.

S/Sgt..Asa L. Westfall, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Westfall, who live in Ripley, is in the automotive section of the Fifth Army Ordnance Company, which services insturments, vehicles, and light and heavy weapons of the 34th "Red Bull" Division in Italy. Overseas almost two years, the company is a veteran of the invasions of North Africa, Salarno and the Alzino beachhead.

Technical 5, William A. Stone, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Stone, of Columbus, Ohio, formerly of Jackson County, is a Military Policeman in the European theatre of operations.

Delmer and Elmer Click, who were in the invasion of Italy, have both been seriously wounded and are in hospitals in Italy. They are the twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Hobert Click of near Cottageville.

Marion Scarberry, who is stationed at Louisville, Ky., and Lawrence Scarberry, who is stationed in Detroit, Mich., recently spent a furlough with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Scarberry, of Mt. Alto.

Pvt. Eldon Patterson, one of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. John Patterson, of Sherman, who are serving in the armed forces, is now on overseas duty. Two other brothers are awaiting their call to duty which will make six brothers from the Patterson family to don the uniform on their country in this war.

Glenn Griffith, Seaman first class, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T.Griffith, formerly of Kenna, but now of Charleston, After taking his basic training at Great Lakes he has been assigned to: the Naval Air Station at Norfolk Virginia.

Pvt. Shelby Garnes, son of Mrs. Betty Garnes, of Liberty, is serving in the Army and has been assigned to the Military Police detachment at Camp Carson, Colorado. He spent several months at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

The War Department notified Mrs. Ona Ramsey, of Ripley, Tuesday that her son, William C. Ramsey, with the United States Army in France, had been missing in action since June 11. Further details, if any are learned, would be transmitted to her without delay, the telegram stated. Ramsey entered the service last October 19 and went overseas late this spring. He was only at home five days after his enlistment and that was a stop-over last February when he was being transferred from Camp Wheeler, Georgia to Camp Meade, Maryland. He was known to have been with the armies in the invasion of Normandy on June 6, and the last letter which the mother received from him, was only a few days ago but had been written before the invasion. (Friday, July 28, 1944)

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The two sons of P.B. Garnes, of Sissonville, serving in the army are both overseas. They are Pvt. Dennis E. Garnes and Pfc. John W. Garnes.

Charles Alexander, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Alexander, formerly of Ravenswood, but now of Akron, Ohio, is serving in the Army Air Corps and at the present time is stationed in Texas. (Friday, July 28, 1944)

Pfc. Delbert E. Rhodes, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.G. Rhodes, of Cottageviile, who is now recovering from an illness contacted in the tropics where he has been with the Army for two years, has sent his father a must interesting trophy from Guadacanal. It consists of a large shield in which a Jap dagger was carried, has several war medals attached to it and a small Buddah. (Friday, Aug. 4, 1944).

News dispatches this week have told of at least four Jackson County men who have been wounded in the European battle zone, but in none of their cases is it believed that their injuries are of such nature which would prevent recovery. Lt. Fred Kiser, of Ripley, has been wounded at the fighting front in France, his wife, who lives in Ripley, having received official notification from the War Department. He has been removed to a base hospital anal more information is expected sometime this week. Charles Burdette, of Sandyville, a son of C. B. Burdette, has also suffered wounds in the same theatre of operations, the nature of which has not been learned. Mrs. Hallie Kuhl, of Ripley, has received word that her husband. Pfc. Roy Kuhl, with the U.S. Infantry in Italy, has suffered wounds on the hand and arm in the battle of Rome and that he is now at a Army rest camp somewhere in Italy. He has been awarded the Purple Heart which he is sending home to his wife. Cpl. John B. Swecker, former teacher of Vocational Agriculture at the Ripley and Cottageville high schools, is also among the wounded in the battle of France, but in a letter to his wife, the former Emogene Smith of Sandyville, indicates that the wounds are not of the serious nature. (Friday, August 4, 1944)

Pvt. Walter F. Culver, son of Mr. and Mrs. F D. Culver, of Medina, is with the Army Medical Corps somewhere in the European theatre of the war. He entered the service in September of last year and arrived in England in March of this year.

Pfc. Gaylord Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Smith, of Sandyville, entered the service last December and is now stationed at Camp Shelby, Miss. He is a brother of Mrs. Audrey Walter, of Leroy, WV.

Russell R. Kittle, who has been in the service for three years and was stationed at Pearl Harbor when the Japs attacked and destroyed the base on December 7, 1941, recently learned that his brother, Lloyd D. Kittle was aboard the Denver, only five miles away and on June 29th where they spent some together. Both are in the U.S. Navy and sons of Mr. and Mrs. Troy Kittle, of Sandyville, WV.

Johnnie Elliott, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Elliott, of Ripley, has been assigned to the Naval Air Force where he will receive his training in the South Pacific theatre of operations. He has been serving in the Navy for some time and won his assignment as a result of an examination.

James Otis Coast, Seaman First Class, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis Coast, of Sandyville. He has been in service for more than a year and is now on active sea duty.

Cpl. Lester Americk, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Americk, of Windy, is stationed somewhere in England. He entered the service in December 1942 and has been overseas for several months.

Cpl. Leonard Earle Naylor , the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. L.G. Naylor, of Ravenswood, RFD., has been serving in the Army since May 1943. He took his basic training at Fort McClellen, Alabama and is now stationed at Camp Blanding, Florida. He is a graduate of Gilmore High School. (August 4, 1944)

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The War Department has notified Mrs. Lucy Palmer, of Sandy vilIe, Rt. 1, that her son Pfc. Floyd Palmer, was killed in action in New Guinea on June 22, and at the same time he was killed his brother, Pfc. Chester Palmer was fighting along side him as the American were cleaning the Japs out of that portion of the Pacific. The young man's father, Foster Palmer, died several years ago. He is a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Grant Palmer and the late Millard Archer. His cousin, Lt. Travis Wells was killed in action last spring. He has two uncles Lindsey and Lysander Palmer, who are serving in the army at the present time. Another war message was also received by Mrs. Belle Rardin this week that her grandson, James Carper, was missing in action in France. He was with a paratroop division and has been missing since the early days of the landing. He is the nephew of Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas, of Ripley, It was also reported to the Hearld yesterday that Mrs.Bertha Jones, of Kenna, had received notification from the War Department that her son had been seriously wounded, but further details had not been learned at press time.

The names of two more young men from Jackson County have been inscribed on the Roll of Honor this week in World War II. Both died on the battlefield in France. One of them is James Lemon, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. James Lemon. The mother is the former Opha Carney, of Ripley, a sister to W. O. Carney, state road superintendent. He was killed in France, according to a message received by the parents from the War Department. The father is a veteran of the first World war and was gassed during the fighting in France in 1918 and has since been in very poor health, according to friends of the family. The other is young William C. "Billy" Ramsey, son of Mrs. Ona Ramsey, of Ripley. Earlier a telegram was received by the mother which said the son was missing in action but further checkup by Army officials at the front revealed that he had been killed in action and the mother was notified. The second telegram was received late last week. (Friday, August 11, 1944).

Lt Porter Hartman, a nephew of Mrs. Oliver D. Kessel, of Ripley, with whom he made his home at the time, has been wounded in Normandy, according to advices received by the relatives and has been evacuated from France to one of the Army base hospitals in England. He was serving with the infantry and went overseas with John B. Swecker, Donald Brown and numerous other young men from this county several months ago.

Pvt. Lloyd Durst recently spent a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Durst, and his wife, who is the former, Lydia Fauver, of Cottageville, after which the returned to duty at Fort Jackson, S.C.

Lionel Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Parsons, of Ripley, has been serving in the Army since March 1943. He has been taking specialized training at a number of schools throughout the country. He has a younger brother, Wendell Parsons, who is serving in the Navy. (Friday. August 11, 1944).

The war against the Japanese in the Pacific is proving costly to Jackson County soldiers and sailors, with an ever increasing number of them being wounded, missing or killed in action in that theatre of operations. One of the recent casualties is Dwight M. Archer, who died at Maffin (?'), New Guinea on Jane 23rd, as a result of wounds received while devotedly ministering to his wounded comrades. Local relatives of the heroic private, a member of the 20th Infantry Medical Detachment of the U.S. Army have received consoling letters informing them of his endless service. General Douglas MacArthur wrote that "His service to this country was charactorized by his devotion to duty, and in his death we have lost a gallant comrade-in-arms." The Chaplain of Dwight's Infantry, Malcolm Younger, stated in his letter, "Only words of highest praise can be spoken of his devotion to duty. He was an inspiration to the men he served." Pvt. Dwight M. Archer, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Archer, of Sandyville, WV, was born at Sandyville on July 31, 1905. For many years he was employed with Weirton Steel, residing with his brother, John Archer, of Pughtown, WV. He attended schools in Jackson, County, WV. He was a member of the Methodist Church of Sandyville. In Sept. 1942, Dwight was inducted into the U.S. Army, going first to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. He was then transferred to San Luis Obispo Calif, for training in desert maneuvers. Following the latter training he went to San Francisco, Calif,, from which port he was shipped overseas to the Hawaiian islands, and from there to the New Guinea war area. Among the survivers is H.O. Archer, now a teacher at Parkersburg High School, who was serving his country until honorably discharged a year ago from Camp Carson, Colorado. The heroic private is also survived by brothers: John of Pughtown, Howard of Akson, Homer O. of Parkersburg; H.M. Archer of Wellsburg. His sisters are: Mrs. Grace Taylor and Mrs. Faye Summerville, of Birmingham, Alabama, Mrs. Olive Haughton of Sandyville. (Friday, August 11, 1944)

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Pvt. Luzon Casto, a son of Mrs. Gilbert Pringle, of Ripley, is serving with the Army somewhere in the Pacific. He was a teacher in the county schools before entering the service. His wife lives in Ripley.

Mrs. Clarice Buie, of Medina, has received a telegram from the War Department informing her that her husband, T/Sgt. Herman Buie with the United States Army in Italy, has been wounded in action and that he has been taken to a Army base hospital there for treatment for his wounds. Mrs. Buie is the former Miss Clarice Naylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard G. Naylor, of Medina, and is with her parents while her husband is in service. The War Department in the telegram stated that when further information was available she would be promptly notified.

Wendell Niles Jarrett, son of Mr. and Mrd. James D. Jarrett, was one of the pilots who took part in the great air battle of Saipan when 135 Jap planes were knocked from the air, the Navy announced this week. Jarrett has already participated in seven operations, for a total of 17 strikes. They were the oc upation of the Marshalls, raid on Palau, occupation of Hollandia, raid on Truk, occupation of Marianas, three raids on Saipan. seven on Guam and the attack on Woleai. He has been awarded the Navy Cross.

The War Department notified Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Brotherton, of Given, that their son, Pfc. Robert Lee Brotherton had been seriously wounded in France on July 17, and that he had been evacuated to an Army base hospital in England and that further information would be given them in due time. Robert Lee Brotherton hsd been in the service for some time and after training in this country went overseas with a contingent of trooos late last spring, among the number going at that time being Donald P. Brown, John Swecker, Keath Bennett, Wade Kessel and a number of others from this section. He has been with the invasion army since D-Day and had been lucky at the beginning of the invasion but was wounded during the period when the going was hardest in the fight for the Cherborg peninsula. The young man is well known in Ripley and his family and friends were making inquiry this week as to whether or not, any late news concerning his condition had been received.

Sgt. John B. Swecker, of Ripley, who was wounded in the invasion of France and is now in a base hospital in Britain, has been awarded the Purple Heart, accor ding to information received this week, Kenna Bush, one of the six sons of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Bush, of Given, who are serving in the armed forces, is at home this week on an eleven day furlough. The other sons are Edward in England, Leo in Hawaii, Raymond in the Marines in the South Pacific, Robert with the Army in Florida and Jonah at Newport News, Va.

15th AAF in Italy: Sergeant Paul M. Tabor, 21, of Sandyville, is now seeing foreign service with one of Major General Nathan F. Twining's B-17 Flying Fortress Squadrons. Sgt. Tabor, a waist gunner, entered the armed forces on March 9, 1943, and received his wings on December 27, 1943 at Laredo, Texas. After a period of intensive training he began his tour of foreign duty on May 17, 1944. Before entering the armed forces he was a store manager. His wife, Maxine Tabor. resides in Sandyville, WV.

Edsel Morris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil T. Morris, of Gay, entered the service on April 13, 1943 and now holds the rank of Corporal. He stationed at Camp Hood, Texas.

Charles Robert Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Cooper, of Sandyville, has finished his preliminary training and is now assigned to active duty with the Navy. His brother, Calvin Burhl Cooper is also serving in the navy and has been on at least one ship which was lost, but he survived.

James Weldon McCrady, son of Mr. And Mrs. Ories McCrady, of Ripley, is serving in Uncle Sam’s Navy. His older brother, Wendell, has been serving in the Navy also for the past two years, and the father is a veteran of Navy service during the first World war.

David Ray Parsons, Seaman Second Class, son of Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Parsons, of Kentuck, is one of the many Jackson County boys who chose that branch of the service for the war with the Axis.

Charles D. Laughlin , son of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Laughlin, of Duncan. He entered the service last February and has been taking specialized (Navy) training at the University of Chicago. (Friday, August 11, 1944)

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The War Department has notified Mrs. Elsie Koch that her son, S/Sgt. Kenneth R. Koch was killed in action on the Normandy front on July 7. The young man had been serving in the Army for twenty five months at the time of his death and had served overseas with the Army since Easter time of this year. Following the battle of Cherbourg he was promoted from the rank of Pfc. to Staff Sergeant. He is the eldest son of Mrs. Elsie Koch and the late F. Leslie Koch and a grandson of Mrs. Nannie Patterson and Mr. and Mrs. A.E. Koch, of Ravenswood. He is survived by the mother and one brother, Sgt. Lawrence Koch, who is in England, and one sister, Mrs.Chales Melweis, of Pittsburgh. The message received by the young man's mother was one of the many received during the past few days which have told of young men being killed in action, wounded in:battles, or missing in action.

Pfc. John W. Garnes was killed in action in France on July 7, according to a message received this week by his father, Pete B. Garnes, of Sissonville, from the War Department, The twenty-three year old infantryman entered the service in October 1942 and trained at Camp Atterbury, Indiana and at Camp Breckenridge, Ky., and went overseas last April. In addition to his father the young man is survived by one sister, Frances Garnes, at home, and two brothers, George W. Garnes of Sissonville, and Pvt. Dennis E. Garnes, stationed in the European theatre of operations. He was killed in France on the same day another young man, S/Sgt. Kenneth Koch, was killed. Both young men went overseas early last spring at about the same time and and fought with the invasion armies in Normandy and in the battles for the Cherbourg peninsula.

The War Department notified Mrs. Blanche Easter, of Ripley, late Monday afternoon that her son, Private Joe Easter, had been missing in action in France since July 26. No further information was given beyond the fact that the department would communicate with her further when any more news concerning him was available. Joe was well known in Ripley and worked on the farm near town and also for J.E. Harrison, owner of the Ripley Dair. Last December he entered the service and after a few months training was sent overseas about two months ago and immediately went into action.

M/Sgt. Joel F. Staats, son of Attorney Carter W. Staats, of ripley, now with the Army on the Italian front, has been awarded the Purple Heart and the Oakk Leaf Cluster. He was wounded last February on the Anzio beach-head and again a few weeks ago in the battle for Rome. He served fifteen months in Panama before goingto Europe last January.

Andrew Cross, son of Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Cross, of Ripley, is serving in the Merchant Marines, and is somewhere on duty in the Pacific area of the war. Before entering the servie he was engaged in fruit growing with his father at the Cross farms near Ripley.

Cecil L. Suck, Seaman 2/c, formerly of Silverton, is spending a 30 day leave with his wife and son at Ripley. He will be stationed at Oakland, Calif., and has recently returned from Pearl Harbor and Saipan. He was at sea 43 days. He is the oldest son of Mrs. Joe Suck, of Ripley. Mrs. Suck has another son in the Navy somewhere overseas.

Robert Brotherton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Brotherton, of Given, has been wounded in France and has been evacuated to an Army Base hospital in Britain. He was participating in the battle of Normandy when he was wounded.

Cpl. Glenn Bower is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bower of Brushy Fork.

S/Sgt. Charles Dillon, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Dillon, of Sandy ville, is with the Army in the European theatre of Operations. He entered the service in September 1942 and has been overseas for some time. His wife, the former Kathleen Davis lives at Ripley.

Wendell Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs.C.O. Parsons, of Ripley, is serving in the Navy and at the present time is stationed at a Pacific base. He entered the service last February.

Hilton Wolfe who was with the paratroopers on D-Day in France, is now back in England and has sent his mother, Erva D. Wolfe, of Given, a camaflouged chute, a German briefcase or field flag and two large pictures of his airborne division. Her other son, BernardWolfe, is transferring this week to Myrtle Beach, Sough C arolina. He is a co-pilot now and is doing a lot of cross-country flying. (Friday, August 18, 1944)

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Telegrams from the War Department announcing that four more men have been killed in action were received by relatives in this vacinity yesterday. 'The young men were Olin Hughes, of Ravenswood, Joe Easter of Ripley, George Davis of Evans, and Lt. Kermit Orders, formerly of Ripley but whose family at the present time are living in St. Albans, WV. Hughes was killed in France on July 31. He had been with the invasion army in its march through Normandy. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Hughes, of Ravenswood and his father is a veteran of the first World War. He attended Ravenswood schools and West Virginia Wesleyan College before entering the service. Joe Easter, son Mrs. Blanche Easter, of Ripley, was first reported missing on July 26 and further information was promised. Information which was available later established the fact that he died in action, the mother was informed. Mrs. Elsie Davis of Evans RFD, received a telegram late in the afternoon that her son, George Davis, who had been overseas several months, had also been killed in action. Lt. Orders, who was with the Fifteenth Air Force in Italy and was a pilot, was killed August 3, the telegram stated. He had been overseas for three months. He completed his flying at Spencer Field, Georgia last February. He attended West Virginia University before entering the service.

Bert E. Carpenter,whose wife and children live at Belgrove, has been selected by the Navy for duty aboard an LSM (Landing Ship, Medium) latest and most advanced design in the nation's growing fleet of amphibious ships. Carpenter is assigned to an LSM crew at the Amphibious Training Base in Little Creek, Va., where he is training for service as Boatswain's Mate. Carpenter is the son of Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Carpenter, of Gay. Carpenter has two brothers who are in the armed forces of the U.S. Army, now both serving overseas. They are: Pvt. Hayes Carpenter and Cpl. Brady Carpenter.

The War Department has notified Mrs. Bertha Jones, of Kenna, that her son, Henry Jones, Jr., serving in the Marine Corps, died of wounds in the Pacific and was buried at sea. The department has earlier notified Mrs. Jones that the son, who had been engaged in some of the hard battles of the Pacific recently, as seriously wounded, and the next information she received was that he was dead. He was 18 years old and more than a year ago joined the Marine Corps and after a period of training was sent to the Pacific. His father, the late Henry Jones, was a veteran of the first World War. The family has lived n the Kenna section of the county for a number of years and the young man who has given his life for his country was known among his friends and acquaintances as Junior Jones. His death added another name to the list of Jackson countians who have made the supreme sacrifice, a list which has been growing rapidly since the war reached its present tempo.

During last (Tuesday) evening four families in Jackson County received telegrams from the War Department and in three of the cases they brought sorrow to the homes, and in the other message brought joy. Mrs. Anita Staats, of Fairplain, received a message that her son, James A. Staats of the Marine Corps had been seriously wounded in the Saipan-Marianas sector of the fighting in the Pacific. Further details were promised. Mrs. Evaline Casto, of Given, received a message that her son, Pvt. Raymond Casto, had been seriously wounded. No further information was given. James M. Floyd, of the Hemlock community received a message that his son, Delbert R. Floyd, had been seriously wounded and in the other case, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Click, of Cottageville, whose son had been reported missing in action several weeks ago, were told that he had returned to duty, alive and well, but gave no further information but it was enough to end anxious hours for the parents who had hoped he would be found. This brought the casualties of the week to ten for a record number in this war thus far, but made more clear the fact that the war has reached a most serious stage.

The War Department last Thursday notified Mr. and Mrs J. E. Blake, of Sandyville, that their son, Pfc. James Kenneth Blake, had been killed in action in the fighting in Guam, but did not give the date of his death but said that a letter followed which explained more in detail. Pfc. Blake was nineteen years old and in September of last year joined the Marine Coops and trained at San Diego, Calif. He was transferred to the Engineering Corps of the Marines and trained at Oceanside, Calif. for some time and went overseas last January and had participated in a number of Pacific engagements against the Japs. He was never home on a furlough after he reported for duty following his enlistment. Surviving in addition to the parents are the following brothers and sisters: Bruce, Wayne, Dale, Clair, Curtis, Paul, all of Sandyville. Delmer Blake of Charleston, Mrs. Frank McGrew of Sandyville, and Mrs. Ernest Digman of Akron, Ohio. At practically the same time the death message was being received by the Blake family, the family of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Sayre, of Evans received a message that their son, Pvt. Millard F. Sayre had been seriously wounded in the battle of Saipan on June 23. No further information concerning his condition has been received. Pvt. Sayre entered the service in September 1941, and went to the Pacific theatre of operations in March 1942 and has been engaged in numerous operations in the theatre of war since that time. (Friday, August 25, 1944)

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The number of Jackson County boys who have made the supreme sacrifice in this war reached a total of twenty nine last night as six new names were.added to a list which as yet does not include a number who are listed as missing. This sent local historians searching for the records of the county for the first World War and they found that a total of 514 men were inducted from the county, and that the casualty list for that war showed 11 killed in action, 1 lost at sea, 4 died of wounds, 5 died of disease abroad and 13 died in the camps and elsewhere.

Word has been received that Pfc. Joe L. Carmichael is now with the fighting forces in France. Joe entered the Army July 17, 1944 and before going overseas finished his training at Camp Pickett, VA. He is serving with the Ordnance Co. and was in the first of the invasion forces landing in France June 6. Joe is the son of Mr. Harry Carmichael and his wife is the former Naomi Vankirk, both of Silverton, His wife and two year old daughter are now residing with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Vankirk, of Silverton.

Word has been received that Pfc. Charles Vankirk is now with the fighting forces in France. He has been serving in the Army for five years. He has been overseas for two years October 5th. Charles was in the invasion forces to land in France in June and is serving in the infantry. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. C.L. Vankirk of Silverton.

Ray ond Eugene Parsons, 25, husband of Mrs. Lois Gaines Parsons, of Ripley, WV, is serving his initial Naval indoctrination at the U.S. Naval Training Station Center, Great Lakes. Ill.

Roma C. Hatcher formerly of Belgrove, now a member of Motor transport Det, SCU1748 was promoted to the rank of Tec. Grade 5 on August 15, 1944. He entered the Army by selective service on Nov 10, 1943. He went to school at Beech Grove. Before entering the service he was employed as a farmer. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Hatcher,

Robert "Bob" Corns, USN is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Corns, of Sandyville. WV. (Friday, August 25, 1944)

Navy deserter calmly tells officers how he took life of Lawrence P. White. Doyle Williams, formerly of Ripley was still driving slain man's car when he was arrested.

The War Department last Saturday notified Mr. and Mrs. Uriah Gandee, of Kenna, but who have been temporarily in Charleston that it had been definitely established that their son, Harold Gandee, had been killed in action when, his plane was shot down last April over Nazi territory in Europe. During the latter days of last April Mr. and Mrs. Gandee received notification that their son was missing in action following the failure of his bomber to return from a mission over German held territory. The parents hoped that he had parachuted to safety and the Red Cross had investigated the case since that time in the hope that he had been found and taken prisoner by the Germans. He was serving as a gunner on one of the heavy Flying Fortresses and had been overseas for several months and had gone on a number of missions before he was listed as "missing in action." He was one of the two sons of the Gandee family who are serving in the armed forces, the other being Howard Gandee, who is with the Marines in the Pacific theatre of operations. The report to the Gandee family sent the fatality list for this county to still a higher mark this week, a list which has already broken the record of losses during the first World War. Information received by the mother this week in a letter from the Adjutant General revealed that the young son was killed on April 11, this information having been secured from the German government through the Red Cross. She was also told that the B-17 on which her son was serving was damaged and began to lose altitude, according to men in other in the formation and that after a time they noticed five parachutes floating down from the damaged bomber. The Secretary of War extended his deepest sympathy. Another young man from Bridgeport, Harrison County, went down in the same bomber. The mission had been over Rostock, Germany. A sister of the young man said yesterday that they received the message that he was dead on August 26 and on August 26 it had been 23 months since he had enlisted. In addition to the parents he is survived by the brother and two sisters, Helen Gandee ,at home and Mrs. Hilda Rankin, of South Charleston.

An advance Ninth Air Force Fighter Base, France: Second Lieutenant Cecil C. Brotton, of Sandyville, has been awarded the Air Medal it was announced here by headquarters of the group in which he is attached. A member of Lt. Col. Harold N. Holt’s P-47 Thunderbolt fighter group which was commanded by Lt. Col. Omar N. Bradley and Lt. Gen. Lewis N. Brereton for its effective support of the invasion of France. Lt. Brotton has taken part in over forty sorties against the enemy in the European theatre of operations. Lt. Brotton is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Brotton, of Sandyville, WV. (Friday, Sept. 1, 1944)

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Lt. Harry Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Homer H. Parsons, of Ripley, is back in a hospital in England recovering from wounds received at the battlefront in France a few days ago and tells his parentws that he is recovering satisfactorily and not to worry about him. He told his parents that he was brought back to an army hospital in England by plane and that he was back at the hospital within an hour and a half after he had been wounded.

Mr. and Mrs. D.P. Cutlip have received a telegram which tells them that their son, Dennis Cutlip, Seaman First Class, was wounded in action in the battle for France on July 24. He has served in the Navy for the past five years and during this war served overseas for a period of eighteen months and then was back in the states six months and went overseas to the European theatre of operations again in March. He had been engaged in battle for a period of twenty-seven days before he was wounded. Two brothers are also in the service, Fred Cutlip and J.W. Cutlip, who are serving in the Army Intelligence division.

Graduation ceremonies recently held at Naval Training School (Radio) on the Northwestern University campus, Evanston, Ill., saw Bluejacket David R. Parsons, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Parsons, of Kentuck, WV, receive his Petty Officer rate of radioman third class.

Two Jackson County soldiers with the invasion army in France on D-Day, Herbert C. Rhodes, of Cottageville, and Okey O. Parsons, of Ripley, have been commended by Allied commanders for the find work they did in fighting 33 days without rest or replacements and carried through every mission they were assigned.

Lt. Gen. George C. Kennedy, Commander of the Allied air Force in the Southwest Pacific, has awarded a second Bronze Oak Leaf cluster to the Air Medal to T/Sgt. Clair E. Kessel, of Ripley, WV.

Pvt. William F. Harrison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lafe Harrison, of Kenna, slightly wounded in France on August 6. No further details.

Pfc. Orville H. Kessel, son of Mrs. Belva Kessle, of near Fairplain, wounded. No further details given in telegram received.

Lt. Harry Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Homer H. Parsons, of Ripley, seriously wounded in France on August 9. Evacuated to base hospital in Britain.

T/Sgt. Orton Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Parsons, of Duncan, wounded in France. Evacuated to base hospital in England.

S/Sgt. Jerrell Clendenin, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.L. Celndenin, of Kenna, sends card to parents dated May 22 in which he says he is well and being held at a German prison camp. His bomber was forced down in Germany April 13, 1944. This is the first message the parents have received from him although the Red Cross had informed them that he had parachuted to safety and was being held a prisoner.

An official telegram received by Mr and Mrs. U.J. Gandee, of Kenna, informs them that their son, Harold Gandee, missing since last April, died when his bomber was shot down by the Germans over Rostock on April 11.

Mrs. Stella Sayre, of Evans, received a telegram Monday that her son, Pvt. Willard Sayre, has returned to duty in France.

Henry Jones, Jr., died in the Pacific, Joe Easter, died in France, and Millard Sayre, wounded in France.

A North American Air Service Command Base: Cpl. Ronald M. Monday, Kenna, WV, stationed in North Africa with an Air Force Service Squadron, has been presented with the Good Conduct ribbon by Capt. Joseph D. Morgan, Jr., Squadron Commander. He is the son of Mr and Mrs. Otho Monday, of Kenna. Cpl. Monday was employed by the Columbian Carbon Company before entering the Army in April 1942. He has served six months overseas.

T/Sgt. Lawrence O. Boyce, son of Mr and Mrs. Charles Boyce, of Medina, has been commended for outstanding performance in action during the campaign in Sicily by American General Mark Clark, who in making the citation, said, “he worked strenuous hours, day and night without sleep or rest, to keep our tanks in operation, and in spite of strain and exhaustion gave his utmost in accomplishing outstanding service in a superior manner.” As a result he has been awarded the Bronze Medal by Gen. Clark and also a citation which he has sent home to his parents. (Friday, Sept 1, 1944).

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For the second time during this war tragedy has struck the home of Mr and Mrs. R.R. Carpenter, of Reedy, the parents of Mrs. Stuart P. Armstrong. Earlier in the war a son, Pvt. Kenneth W. Carpenter, was killed in the North African campaign, and last week the family received another telegram from the War Department which told them that another son, Sgt. Walter Carpenter, a turret gunner on a B-17 bomber was missing.

The Carpenter family is the second in this section to lose two sons in the present war, the other being the family of Mr and Mrs. George W. Boso, whose two sons, Charles and Burhl, both gave their lives in the European theatre of operations.

The first soldier in this section who participated in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day who has come home since that time is Archie Pennington, who is spending a furlough with his parents, Mr and Mrs. J.L. Pennington, of Given.

Young Pennington was wounded during the fighting on that first day. He was serving with the airborne glider troops and in landing his glider struck a tree and was torn to shreds. The men, for the most part, landed safely but in the crash lost their heavy equipment and were left with only guns of small caliber with which to fight and as they hit the ground they went into action immediately since they were landing in one of the hottest spots along the seashore.

Telegrams from the war front telling of casualties each day are received, the latest being taken to the home of Mrs. Helen Zahrndt in Ravenswood which appraised her of the death of her son, Virgil Carleton Zahrndt, who was killed in action in France. Young Zahrndt entered the service in Sept of last year at the time he was eighteen years of age and after several months training went overseas and was with a tank crew at the time he was killed on August 4th. He had been engaged in the campaigns in France for several weeks. His father died four years ago and during his lifetime was a well known farmer of the Millwood community. After his death, the mother, Mrs. Helen Zahrndt, moved to Ravenswood where she resides at the present time with the young man’s three brothers and two sisters.

Mr and Mrs. Bob Barnette, of Given, were informed that their eldest son, Sgt. Roy L. Barnette, has died in action in France. He had been one among the earlier men to be called to service and had been overseas for some time prior to his death which occurred, according to the message, on July 17, on the battlefields of France. In addition to the parents, he is survived by one brother, Raymond Barnette, who is serving in the Navy, and three sisters, Mrs. Lourie Aubertine, of Columbus, Miss Grace Barnett, who is employed in Columbus at the present time, and Mrs. Norine Kursey, of Given.

Wounded in action: Pvt. Charles Scarberry, Jr., son of Mrs. Cahrles Scarbetty, of Cottagville.

Cpl. Edgar Raymond Board, son of W.H. Board, of Gay, was also wounded in France and was evacuated to an Army base hospital in England for further treatment of his wounds. He has been in the service for nearly two years and has been overseas in the European theatre of operations for the past year serving in the ordnance department. He has a brother, Harold Board, who is serving in the Army Air Corps.

There is a possibility that Emil Nichols, of Ripley, serving in the Marine Crop and wounded in the fighting on Saipan in the Pacific several weeks ago, may lose his left leg as a result of the wound, his step-father, C.C. Derey, of Ripley, learned this week, Nichols is in a hospital in New Caledonia.

Under date of last Thursday, Mr and Mrs. Roy Mitchell, of Liverpool, received a telegram which told them that their son, Pvt. Roy Mitchell, had been wounded in France and that he had been taken back to a hospital in France for treatment.

Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas, of Ripley, was informed this week that her nephew, James Carper, who had been missing for several months following a bomber flight over German territoy, was a prisoner of the Nazis. (Friday, Sept 1, 1944).

Sgt. Darrell C. Stone, Ripley Rt 1, has been awarded the newly created Combat Infantryman Badge as a member of the Ninth Infantry Division.

William R. Andrick, holder of the Distinguished Service Cross for heroic service in the taking of hill 700 on Bouganville several months ago, has been awarded the Presidential Citation because of his unusual heroism displayed when he advanced on the Japs entrenched in the pillbox and killed every single one of them. Although he was wounded in the exploit and has spent long months in hospitals, he has almost completely recovered. He is the son of Mr and Mrs. C.E. Andrick, of Sandyville, and has two brothers also wearing the service uniform in this war. (Friday, Sept 15, 1944).

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Donald P. Brown, a former instructor in Vocational Agriculture at Ripley High School, has been wounded in France and awarded the Purple Heart Medal. He entered the service nearly two years ago, went overseas in April and was among the troops who participated in the invasion of France. He was attached to an anti-tank company and with a division which has suffered heavy casualties in the present drive through that theatre of operations.

A late report just before the Herald went to press was that Kenith Covey, a son of Mr and Mrs. Bilton Covery, of Given, was missing in action, according to a telegram from the War Department. He had been missing since July 31. The Covey family formerly lived at Advent, Washington District, but after spending some time in Charleston, moved to a farm in the Given section some time ago. Residents of that section who were contacted last night were unable to give more information on the case.

Another late report which came over the wires to the Herald last night, and which could not be confirmed by contacting the young man’s relatives in the Emma Chapel community, was that Arnold Bailey, son of Mr and Mrs. Cleve Bailey, who had been held as a prisoner of war in Rumania, was now back with his command in Italy. He was among the three thousand fliers who were shot down in the sky war over the Rumanian oil fields several months ago, and who had been held prisoner until released by the Rumanians when they left the side of Germany and entered the war on the side of the Allies last week. Two thousand of the more than three thousand fliers shot out of the sky had been killed, it has now been learned, but Bailey was one of the 1,105 who parachuted to safety.

An Advanced Ninth Air Force Fighter Base, France: Second Lieutenant Cecil C. Brotton, Jr., 24, Sandyville, WV, is a member of the “Touble Shooter” squadron of Lt. Col. Harold N. Holt’s Hun Hunters and he has flown 25 missions, since his arrival in the European theatre of operations and France. He wears the Air Medal and five Oak Leaf Clusters. Lt. Brotton is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Brotton, of Sandyville. He entered the service April 1941.

Miss Bernice C. Moore, daughter of P.L. Moore, of Medina, recently enlisted in the WAVES of the United States Navy and after taking basic training at Hunter College in New York is now stationed at Virginia Beach, Va.

Pfc. Denzil Sullivan, son of Mrs. Bessie Dotson, is serving overseas with the Army Signal Corps. Cpl Earl Sullivan, son of Mr and Mrs. E.T. Sullivan, and is with the Army Medical Corps in the European theatre of operations. Pfc. Orville Sullivan, son of Mr and Mrs. Clarence Sullivan and is taking training to prepare for combat duty.

S/Sgt. William P. Boggess, son of Mr and Mrs. Guy Boggess, and grandson of Mrs. Lena Boggess, of Liverpool, recently was one of 517 members of the 82nd Airborne Division to receive recognition for work accomplished during early hours of the June invasion of Europe. Along with 111 others he won the Silver Star Medal. The division commanded by Major Gen. Mathew B. Ridgeway, spearheaded the invasion landing by parachute and glider several hours before H-hour on D-Day. Three hours before the seabourne force began landing, the division had captured the important junction of Ste Mere Englis. It prevented the German divisions to the west and south from interfering with the beach landings, wrested strategic positions from the enemy, and held the southern flank while other forces took Cherbourg.

William Wayne Waybright, son of Mr and Mrs. W.H. Waybright, of Ripley, was wounded in action in France on August 25, according to a telegram received by the parents from the War Department this (Wednesday) morning. He had been overseas for several months and had been with the forces in France for some time.

The three sons of Mr and Mrs. C.E. Andrick, of Sandyville, are all serving in the armed forces and are overseas. Pfc. William R. Andrick is at Bourgainville, and was recently awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for wiping out a number of Japs. Cpl. Charles Andrick is stationed in New Guinea and Roy Andrick is serving in the Pacific with the USN.

Four members of the family of Mr and Mrs. U.G. Weekley, of Odaville, are serving their country in the present war. Cpl. Ray Weekley is with the Army in Texas, having been sent home after participating in the African campaign. Pfc. Austin Weekley is with the Army in Corsica which has invaded southern France. Pvt. Ulysses Weekley is with the Army in the European theatre of operations and Miss Charity Jean Weekley is an Army nurse.

Pfc. Charles Roush is a son of Mr and Mrs. Elmer Roush, of Millwood, and is with the invasion armies in France. His brother, Fred Roush, Seaman second class, is serving in the Navy and is stationed in Australia. (Friday, Sept 15, 1944).

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Mrs. Howard Jones, local Red Cross receipt of a communication from W. H. Richardson, of the Army, in which he praises Golden Crane, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ebb Crane, of Fairplain, who was wounded in action in New Guinea. some time ago.

Sgt. Roy L. Barnette was born at Rockcastle, West Virginia, February 28, 1916, was killed in France, July 27, 1944. He had served with the U.S. Army since January 15, 1942. He trained at Camp Walters and Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and Camp McCoy, Wis. Was sent overseas September, 1943. He took his part in the invasion, was on the front lines fifty days. He was awarded the Bronze Star for gallantry in action the first part of July. He leaves to mourn his loss, his father, Mr. Bob Barnett of Given, one brother, S 2/c Raymond Barnett of theU. S. Navy, three sisters, Mrs. Lura Aubertine, Mrs. Grace King, of Columbus, Ohio, and Mrs. Norene Kersey, of Given. His mother preceded him in death July 24, 1943 and his brother, Rondus, January 23, 1941,

Sgt. Roy L. Barrette, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bob Barnette, of Given, was killed in action in France on July 17, the War Department has notified the parents. Sgt. Barnette had been overseas for several months and was with a unit which participated in the invasion of France.

The four sons of Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Casto, of Rockcastle, are in uniform. Cpl. Milford Casto, an aviator radar operator with the Marines, is the husband of the former Marie Kessel, who with a small daughter, is with her parents near Ripley, He is stationed in North Carolina. S/Sgt. Dale C Casto has been in the service more than three years and is in England. Cpl. Arth:ur Casto is with the Army Air Corps in Texas, and Cpl. Bernard Casto, also with the Army Air Corps, is in Florida. All are graduates of the Ripley High School, except Bernard who was graduated from Stonewall Jackson High School in Charleston.

Pfc. George Shinn and Henry Lee Shinn, Seaman first class, are sons of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Shinn, of Leon, and brothers of Mrs. Floyd Wheeler, of Mt. Alto. George is with the forces in England and Henry Lee is at sea.

The three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Abednego Canaan Skeen, of Fletcher, are all serving in the Army and are all overseas at the present time. Donald Skeen is serving in the Pacific theatre of operations. Paul Skeen is stationed in the Admiralty Islands, and Harry F. is serving in France.

The three sons of Mr. and Mrs. O.F. Hyre, of Ripley, are ail serving in uniform and two of them are overseas at the present time. Herbert Hyre is a radio operator with the merchant marines and is in Scotland. Guy Hyre is serving in the Army and is in England, and Kermit Hyre is serving in the Navy and at the present time it at Little Creek, Virginia,

Mrs. Canna Gordon, of Kenna, has received a letter from her son, Pvt. Robert Gordon who is out of the (Army) hospital now. (Friday, Sept. 15, 1944)

A telegram was received by Mrs. Hazel Casto Hughes, of Ravenswood, on Monday in which she was informed that Pvt. Boyd Earle Trigg of the U. S. Marine Corps had been wounded in action in the fighting in the Mariani Islands in the Pacific during the attack on one of the strong points on the islands on July 31. This was the second time Trigg had been wounded in the South Pacific war, the first time being last February 12 when the Marines were endeavoring to take over certain sections of the island which were strongly defended by the Japs. He recovered from that injury and returned to duty several weeks ago and was with the Marines in the invasion early in July. Pvt. Trigg made his home with G.W. Casto, of Evans, and enlisted in the Marine Corps early in the war and has almost four years service at the present time. He has been in the Pacific war zone since early in the war and has been engaged in many of the battles, which have been fought and in many of the landings as our forces have moved steadily forward in that area.

A telegram was received last Saturday from the War Department which stated that Lt. Fred Kiser, of Ripley, who was wounded during the early days of the invasion of France, was able to return to duty with his company on August 25. His wife, the former Mazie Montgomery, and their small son live in Ripley.

Neil Blagg, son of Mrs. J. A. Blagg, of Collegeville, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was a tail gunner on a Flying Fortress on the American raid on the Polesti oil fields in Rumania early in the war, and his plane was shot down and he landed in Turkey and was interned. He had shot down seven German planes before his own plane was forced to land. (Friday, Sept 22, 1944).

Page 49

Marshall Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Parsons, of Kenna, is serving in with the U.S. Marines. His brother, Mayf ord Parsons, is serving in the Army.

With the 37th Infantry Division somewhere in the Southwest Pacific area: Pvt. Hoyt D. Iman, 19 year old son of Mr. John E. lman, of Kentuck, has become a member of the veteran 37th Infantry Division. The young jungle fighter has been in the Pacific battle area for five months and in that period has been stationed at New Caledonia, Guadalcanal and Bougainville. He is now in a regiment that is noted for its succession of victories throughout the Solomon Islands,

Sgt. James Campbell, having completed his flying missions over Germany and having spent a furlough with his father, John Campbell, of Sandyville, and relatives in Ripley, will return to rest camp in Florida. He has several decorations.

Pvt. Raymond King, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh King, of Ripley RFD is serving in the Army in the European theatre of operations at the present time. His wife is Marie King.

S/Sgt. Clement D. Dowler, 20, who has been missing since April 28th has written to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Dowler, of Rt 5, Parkersburg. Mrs. Dowler was formerly Grace Farley. The letter informed the parents that he was safe and well and looking forward to coming home soon. Missing in a bomber flight over France since last April, his parents had received no word until an air mail letter written Sept 3rd, arrived last Tuesday. Dowler served as a gunner on a B-17 and his letter tells his family he is somewhere in Europe but unable to reveal his location at present and as yet has no mailing address. He has two brothers in the service, Sgt. Weldon Dowler, somewhere in France, and Marvin Dowler, Jr., Apprentice seaman in training with the Navy at Sampson, N.Y. The Dowler brothers are the great grandsons oh the late W. H, Thomas, of Sandyviille, Rt. 2.

Pvt. Lawrence D. Gorrell, of the Medical Corps, is the youngest son of Mrs. Laura Gorrell, of Sandyville.

Lt. Ruth Sheppard, Army Nurse in Italy, meets the Pope. Writes Mother about present for family. Lt. Ruth M. Sheppard, Army Nurse in Italy, has written her mother, Mrs. S. L. Sheppard, of Reedy, and describes her visit to Rome and tells of meeting the Pope. She is a sister to Mrs. A. Clyde Wright, of Ripley, She is a graduate of the St. Joseph's school of nursing and enlisted in the service last December, 1942.

Johnnie Elliott, Jr., Seaman Second Class, is the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Elliott, of Ripley. He entered the Navy early this year, has completed his basic training and has now been assigned to active duty with the fleet.

His fifty missions over Germany completed, James Morris, son of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Morris, of Youngstown, Ohio, and a nephew of Sheriff and Mrs. Foster Morris, of Ripley, has been visiting for several days. He was a bombardier on a Flying Fortress and came through his fifty missions safely.

Two soldiers, S/Sgt. Bradford C. Rhodes, and Pvt. Paul E. Fischer, are returning home after serving in the Mediterranean theatre of war for some time. Rhodes lives at Belgrove and saw seven months of service overseas. Fischer lives at Sandyville and has been on the Italian front for six months.

Pvt. Lional Boston, of Palestine, who was wounded in France some time ago, is now back at an Army hospital in Georgia for treatment. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Boston, and his father is a veteran of World War I. He is a nephew of P.R. Miller, of Ripley, 'and Mrs. J. G. Cornes of Sandyville. He is the first of six members of their families to be wounded in battle in this war.

Mr. and Mrs. Pearl R. Miller has received word that their son, Pfc. Carl R. Miller has landed safely in England. Carl entered the Army May 14, 1943. He took his basic training at Camp Hulen, Texas and Camp Campbell, Ky., and Camp Davis, N.C. He had 7 days leave in Sept, 1943 and 12 days of leave in June 1944, then went to Fort George G. Meade, Md., before going to England. He is with an Anti-Air Craft.

Mrs. Audrey Raines has received word that her husband, Pvt. Junior Lee Raines is now with the fighting troops in France. He was sent to England before going to France. Pvt. Raines entered the Army Dec 7, 1943 and took his training at Camp Croft, S. C„ with the 37th Infantry. He had 14 days leave in May of this year, was sent to Camp George G. Meade, Md., then overseas. His wife is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl R. Miller, of Ripley. He is now in the 116th Infantry and a son of Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Raines, of Evans.

Pfc. Thomas Raymond Hudson, serving with the Combat Engineers of the Army, is now overseas. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Hudson, of Ripley, and his wife is the former Freda Sheppard, of Sandyville. His brother, Cpl. Edward Hudson, is with the Army in England. (Friday, Sept. 22, 1944)

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Pfc. Oliver Starcher, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.R. Starcher, of Given. He entered the service in August 1941 has been stationed in Hawaii. He is a graduate of Ripley High School.

On the “Honor Roll of Boys in the service,” as posted by B.E. Hanes, teacher in the Board school at Frozen Camp, near Gay, are the names of six pairs of brothers, and only two other names in the list are former pupils, also one pair of brothers in the five additional names of boys from the community. The list follows: Wayne and Clair Matheny, Walter and Robert Reed, Frank and Leroy Cunningham, Delbert and Clair Wiblin, Harry and Earnest Parsons, Marvin and Glenn Godbey, Cleo Pickens and Earl Parrish, Dale Lee, Clarence Paugh, and Lloyd King.

Carl Maddox , son of Mr. and Mrs. George Maddox, of Vinton, Ohio and who has many relatives in Sandyville, is serving in the United States Navy and is somewhere with the Pacific fleet,

Pvt. Darrell Gandee, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Gandee, of Kenna, is serving in the Army in Calif. His wife is the former Mae Anderson, who lives at Kenna while her husband is serving in the armed forces.

Pvt. Charles Scarberry who was wounded in action in the early days of the invasion of France, has returned to active duty with the troops, according to a message received by relatives. He returned to duty on August 26, the message said.

Denver Clendenin, S 2/c, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Clendenin, of Liberty, and a grandson of O. F. Hill, formerly of Jackson County. He has recently spent a seven day leave with his parents and returning to the Sampson New York Training Station.

Sgt. Paul M.Tabor, 21 year old waist gunner on a Flying Fortress, has been promoted to the rank of S/Sgt. He is with the 15th Army Air Force in Italy and entered the service in December 1943 and went overseas last May. His wife, the former Marine Dawkins, of Sandyville.

Dale Dayton Durst, son of H. C, Durst, of Cottageville, has been serving in the Army for some time and is overseas in the European theatre of operations, (Friday, Sept. 22, 1944)

Technical Fifth Grade John S. Bell, son of Mr. and Mrs. John G. Bell, of Parkersburg, writes his parents that he owes Dr. Holmes Blair of Parkersburg, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.F.Blair, of Sandyville, a lot of thanks for saving his eye-sight in a field hospital there in France. Dr. Blair is now a Major in the Medical Army Corps. Bell is now in a hospital in England.

War telegrams were coming to homes in Jackson County last night at a faster rate than ever before in this war, and there was sorrow in households this (Wednesday) morning where hope for the safety of sons had reigned only a few hours before. Mr. and Mrs. Delbert R. Snyder, of Ripley, had been notified that their son, Pvt. Wade Snyder, was killed in France on August 24, the same day on which he had written them a letter which was received only a few hours before the death telegram. Their other son, Fred (?) Snyder, with the Navy in the South Pacific, was wounded, they had learned.

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Baker, of Ravenswood. were notified that their son, Charles Baker, Jr., a pilot with the Army Air Force in France, had been missing since September 11.

Laura Bearce, of Pleasant View, had been notified that Pfc. Glenda R. Boggess, had been wounded in France on September 13. The young man was reported to be a step-son of Fred Bearce.

Mr. and Mrs. Holland Koontz, of Kenna, were notified that their son, John Rex Koontz, had been seriously wounded in the fighting in Belgium. They were promised further particulars but the telegram was of the nature which is sent only in cases where the wounds are serious, "The worst night of the war," was what newsmen and telegram operators were saying this morning, and all were sobered by the fight that reports being received now are not yet as late as the dates when the severest fighting began in Belgium-France-Holland land battles near the German west wall.

A telegram was received Saturday by Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Reed, of Sherman, who live in the Toppins Grove community of Grant District, that their son, Pfc. William C. Reed, had been wounded in battle in the fight for Belgium. No further news had been received of his conditions early this week, Pfc. Reed entered the service about two years ago, and had not been overseas but only a few weeks when he was wounded. The telegram stated that he was wounded September 5, and it was during that period and the time which had intervened that the American forces made rapid stride through that section of Europe and liberated Belgium along with France and portions of the Netherlands. The fighting along the eastern front has been bitter during the past few days and many casualties are reported but telegrams concerning these will likely not begin to come in for possibly another two weeks. (Friday, Sept.29,1944)


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