WWII Military Service News


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A telegram was received from the War Department Saturday evening by Mr. and Mrs. R.R. Carpenter, of Reedy, which informed them that through the offices of the International Red Cross it had been definitly established that their son, Sgt. Walter Carpenter, missing in action since a bombing mission over Germany several weeks ago, was a prisoner of war in Germany. This telegram relieved the anxiety of the family who hope that he will eventually come home after the liberation which will follow the downfall of Germany. Another son of the Carpenter family, Kenneth Carpenter, was killed during the battle for North Africa early in the war. The son, Walter, who was reported missing a few weeks ago and was a gunner on a Flying Fortress and had participated in a number of missions before his plane was forced down. The two Carpenter sons are brothers of Mrs. Stuart P. Armstrong, of Ripley and Charleston. .

Rollie C. Hill, son of Mr. Oliver C. Hill, of Leroy,. West Virginia, has been enrolled as a student in the Instructor Indoctrination Unit at the Galveston Army Air Field, Galveston, Texas. The school, utilizing the skill and knowledge of veterans in aerial warfare, trains combat men to serve as instructors at various crew training bases throughout the country. Overseas for nine months, T/Sgt. Hill participated in 30 missions against the enemy in the European theatre of Operations. He flew as a radio operator and won the Distinguished Flying Cross, The Presidential Unit Citation and the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters. Entering the service on December 13, 1942 at Fort Thomas, Ky., the Sgt. returned to the U.S. on August 3.

Pfc. Joseph G. Scarbrough, husband of Mrs. Myrtle Scarbrough, of Gay, has arrived safely with the troops overseas in the Pacific theatre of operations,

Rudie R. Cox, formerly of Cottageville, has recently been promoted to Seaman First Class in the Navy. He entered the serivce last April and is now stationed at New York. His wife, the former Mildred Rhodes and their daughter, Patricia, are living at Ripley.

Clayton Lytton, son of Mrs. Pauline Glenn, of St. Albans, is serving in the Army and is somewhere in the South Pacific theatre of operations. His wife, the former Maxine Winter, of Ripley.

Pfc. John R. Williams, son of J. W. Williams, and the late Mrs. Williams, of Sherman, is serving in the Army and is in England, or possibly by the time this is published with the forces on the continent of Europe.

S/Sgt. Arnold A. Bailey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cleve Bailey, of Liberty, a graduate with the class of 1941 at the Ripley high school. The parents have been notified that the ship on which the young man is coming home will dock at an undisclosed port in this country tomorrow and he will be granted a furlough and may be expected home at any time. The bomber on which he served as a to: turret gunner was shot down over the Romanian oil fields on May 5. He was a prisoner until his release on August 31. Joy reigned in the Bailey home when a telegram was received because in addition to the glad news that Arnold was nearing home shores a letter had arrived telling them that another son, Harold Bailey, who had been in the South Pacific three years, and also a graduate of Ripley High School, was back in the states and was on his way home and might be expected at any hour since he could not communicate futher with them while he was on his way. So the Bailey household is happy after weeks of anxiety as a mother plans to take into her arms once again one son she hasn't seen for three years, and another which she feared for four months was not among the living.

Albert D. Clendenin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Clendenin, of Kenna, entered the Navy last February and is now stationed in North Africa.

Pvt. Harold F. McGrew of Sandyville, and Pvt. Okay L. Casto, of Staats Mills, have been transferred from Camp Attenbury, Indiana to Camp Blending, Florida, and Pvt. Leo D. Randolph, of Ripley, to the Army Air Base at Amarillo, Texas, the Army announced this week.

Sgt. Henry D. Scarberry, of Mt. Alto, was injured in battle in France, according to a message received by the relatives at Mt. Alto last Wednesday and his leg was in a cast. Relatives were not told any details about how he was injured. (Friday, Sept 29, 1944).

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S/Sgt. Victor Skeen, of Kentuck, and Pfc. Dencil Herdman, of Evans, are serving with the 349th Infantry Regiment, one of Lt. Gen. Mark W.Clark’s Fifth Army units which smashed the Gustav and Hitler Lines and chased the Germans from the Garigliano to the Arno River in Italy. Part of the 88th Infantry Division, first Selective Service infantry division to enter combat on any front, the 349th piled up a total of 95 miles gained in 46 days of actual combat during the Fifth Army sweep up the Italian Peninsula. Known as the "Kraut-Killers,” doughboys of the 349th fought across some of the worst mountainous terrain to capture Fondi, key point in the vaunted Adolph Hitler Line, and protected the flank of the French Corps in its push across Mts. Ausoni and Iepini. Highlights of the regiments actions below Rome came at Maenza when one platoon ambushed an entire German armoured company attempting to flee the town. After driving through Rome, the 349th was pulled back for a rest in mid-June. It returned to combat early in July, and after envelopment of Volterra, it overcame stubborn enemy resistance in a smash to the south bank of the Arno River. During the action, one of its toughest battles occurred after capture of Palaia and San Miniato, when a platoon of the 349th beat off eight German counter-attacks of near battalion strength while holed up in a house at Calenzano.

Pvt. Guy A. Parsons son of John F. Parsons, of Ripley, is serving in the Army and is stationed at Camp Hood, Texas, where he is training for combat duty.

Pvt. Junior P. Parsons, grandson of Mrs. Cora Randolph, of Ripley, has returned to duty at Fort Knox, Ky, after a several month illness which kept him confined in a Louisville hospital.

Willard C. Deem, of Ravenswood, has been serving in the Navy since February and at the present time is stationed in Australia. His wife, the former Bernice Taylor, of Ravenswood,.

Ralph Fisher, Seaman Second Class, who has been serving in the Navy for several months and is somewhere in the Pacific, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Fisher, of Rockcastle.

Jennings Bowles, of Rockcastle, has enlisted in the Navy and his wife, Sarah Bowles, is living at Rockcastle during her husbands absence.

Earl B. Hanning, son of Mrs. Georgia Rhodes, of Akron Ohio, is serving in the Navy, and is somewhere in the Pacific. He entered the service several months ago and has been trained as a specialist in the line of work to which he has been assigned.

T/Sgt. James M. Campbell, of Ripley, WV, recently passed through this Air Service Command Station, England, en route to a well earned rest after 33 missions as a Radio Operator-Gunner on B-24 Liberator. Before his return to the states, T/Sgt. Campbell was awarded the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters and the Distinguished Flying Cross. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Campbell, of Sandyville, WV.

S/Sgt. Herman Carney, son of Mr. and Mrs. V.L. Carney, of Ripley, recently enjoyed a “recess”' from aerial warfare at an Air Service Command Rest Home, a remodeled English manor house where American airmen who provide aerial cover for the advancing Allied Armies in France may relax between missions. S/Sgt. Carney has completed 63 missions over Nazi dominated Europe. Before entering the Army he was employd as a truck drawer by he Smith Trucking Company, Charleston WV.

James Alva Randolph, son of Mr. And Mrs. A. C. Randolph, of Carbon, WV, is now serving with the fleet after completing his preliminary training. His sisters, Mrs. Harl Casto and Mrs. W.M. Ashby, live in Ripley.

William E. Staats, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Staats, of Ripley, is serving in the Navy somewhere in the Pacific theatre of operations. His brother, Clarence Staats, is serving in the Army and is somewhere in the Pacific area.

Pvt. Ronald Anderson entered the service last April and trained for duty in the Field Artillery at Camp Gordon, Georgia. He recently spent several days with his family and relatives here.

Pvt. Gussie B. Pickens, son of Mrs. Bertha Lanham, of Ripley, is serving in the Army and trained for duty at camps in California. His brother, Shirley, is also in the service.

Eugene Hood, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clerc Hood, of Ripley, recently spent a leave here with his parents, but has now returned to duty. He trained at Great Lakes, Illinois.

Otho Tolley, son of Mrs. Amy Tolley, of Gay, is serving in the U.S. Navy and is stationed at New OrIeans. He has been in then service for several months.

Pfc. Claude W. Skeen, son of W. D. Skeern, of Kentuck, WV, was graduated last week from the Army Air Force Flexible Gunnery School, Larado Army Air Field, Larado, Texas, a member of the AAF Training Command. He is now qualified to take his place as a member of a bomber combat crew. Along with his diploma, he received a pair of Aerial Gunner's silver wings and a promotion in grade at brief graduation exercises held here. (Friday, Sept. 29, 1944)

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The casualties of war continued too be reported in Jackson County this week at an ever increasing rate as a result of the added tempo in the fighting along the Siegfried line and in the low countries of Europe, but even with increased number reports the latest was nearly a month behind time. Lt. Morris Miils, the husband of Marv Matlock Mills, of Ravenswood, a flyer in the South Pacific, had been shot down in a battle there early in September and lived two days after his injury, the wife was told by the War Department. He had a record of more than fifty missions, according to friends of the family, who said that the young man had been overseas in the Pacific theatre of operations for several months.

Another casualty report was received by Mark Hill, of Evans, who was told by the War Department that his son, Pvt. Denver Hill, had been killed in action in France. Pvt. Hill had been overseas for several months and was among the troops participating in the invasion of France.

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Kittle, of Sandyville, learned that their son, Rex Kittle, was seriously wounded in France, and in a letter to them from the nurse who was caring for the young man, they were told that he "was to weak to write" and that he had asked her to write his parents for him. He had been in Italy and was with Gen. Patch's Array in the invasion of southern France several weeks ago.

Mrs. Junior Lee Raines, of Ripley, Rt 1, learned that her husband had been wounded in France on September 14 and that his "part in the war was over", and that after he had sufficiently recovered at an English hospital base where he is at the present time, he would be sent back to this country for further treatment.

In neither the Kittle, or the Raines cases were the relatives informed any particulars about the injury.

Porter Hartman, a nephew of Mrs. Oliver D. Kessel, returned to duty on August 29, according to a message from the War Department. He was wounded in France on July 10 while directing mortar fire against the enemy in the hotly contested sections south of Normandy beach-head.

Pfc. Karl L. Crum, son of Mrs. J.O. Crum, of Cottageville, has been wounded in France, and the mother was informed this week that he is in a hospital there and has been since he was wounded in action with the Combat Engineers. Under date of September 9 his superior officer wrote Mrs. Crum, as follows: "The War Department has no doubt notified you by thi. time of the fact that your son, Karl, was wounded in action on September 4, 1944. I saw him in the hospital last night and he told me that he had written you. Since I have commanded this company for well over a year, I know your son very well and I greatly regret his injury. He was injured while clearing an enemy mine field. The explosion caused the amputation of his left foot midway between the knee and the ankle. Although he received several other wounds also, he seems to be recovering nicely and the doctors said that he will become entirely well except for the loss of the foot. Karl looks exceptionally good considering what he has undergone and is surprisingly cheerful and reconciled to his loss. He remained conscious after the injury during all the time he was being given first aid and was being taken to the hospital, etc. The manner in which he kept his head and stood up under the terrible pain he was suffering was almost unbelievable. He has always been a fine man and one of the very best soldiers I have had in the company but I have never before appreciated how much courage and plain "guts" that he had. You should be proud of him! I only hope that nothing will happen to change the courageous attitude he has taken toward his injury and that he will realize that with the help of an artificial limb he should not be greatly handicapped in civilian life. I doubly regret his injury at this time when at least it seems the end of the war is in sight after he had gone through five campaigns. I trust that it will not be too long a time before the hospital considers him well enough to travel home and that you will see him there. If there is any way that I can be of aid, let me know." Later: Mrs. Crum has now received the telegram from the War Department which informed her that her son had been seriously wounded. It came two days after the letter from the officer had been received.

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Kittle, of Sandyville, received notification from the War Department this week that their son, Rex Kittle, had been wounded. He is somewhere in the European theatre of operations.

A telegram was received Monday by Mr. and Mrs. Holland Koontz, of Kenna, notifying them that their son, John Rex Koontz, had died of his wounds received during the fighting in Belgium. They had been notified last week that he had been seriously wounded.

Capt. Glen H. Koontz, 8th Air Force Thunderbolt pilot, was recently home for rest and reassignment. Capt. Koontz holds the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters. He has been over Berlin many times. (Friday, Oct 6, 1944)

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Capt. Glen H. Koontz, son of the late Wid Koontz, and grandon of the late H.J. Koontz, of Rockcastle, was married Sept 1st, to Miss Ruth Trott, of Miami, Florida. Mrs. Koontz is a graduate of Florida State College for Women and at the time of her marriage was employed in the map making department in Washington.

Another name was added to the list of the nation's heroic dead this week when Mrs. Ira Currey, of Staats Mills, received information which told her that her brother, Sgt. Maple James, had been killed in action in France on Sept. 12. The information did not inform her of the sector in which the young man had made the supreme sacrifice. She has another brother, Lyle James, who is serving in the Army and is somewhere in France at the present time. Sgt. James had been overseas for several months, and had been with a unit in the hottest spots of fighting since the invasion. His parents, Rev. and Mrs. C. L. James, are living in Gilmer County at the present time.

Pvt. Wade Snyder had written a letter to his parents on August 24, just a few hours before he was killed, and told them something of the section of France in which he was fighting, it was revealed this week by the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Snyder, of Ripley, who received the telegram Tuesday the son had been killed in action on that same day. Their other son, Creed Snyder, who has beers serving in the South Pacific, has been wounded. The Snyder family moved from Crow Summit to Ripley only a short time ago. In addition to the parents and the brother who is serving in the Navy, he is survived by the following brothers and sisters, Rex, Delores, Jimmy, Eddie .and Shipley Ann Snyder, all at home.

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Baker, of Ravenswood, received a message that their son, Charles Baker, Jr., was missing in action in France since September 11. The message was relayed to them by the young flier's wife to whom it had been sent by the War Department.

Mr. and Mrs. Holland Koontz, of Kenna, received a message that their son, John Rex Koontz, had been seriously wounded in Belgium in the early part of September.

Mrs. Laura Bearce, of Pleasant View, received a message that Pfc. Glenda F. Boggess had been wounded on September 13.

Sgt. John Cossin, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Okey Cossin, of Cottageville, WV, has been awarded a blue and gold Distinguished Unit Citation ribbon. He is a cook in the top scoring P-51 Mustang Fighter Group of the Mediterranean theatre, under the command of Lt. Col. Yancey S. Tarrant, of Brownwood, Texas.

Pvt. Georgia Donohew, of Evans, received a telegram about seven o'clock this (Wednesday) morning from the War Department which told her that her husband, Pvt. Glenmer Donohew, had been wounded in France on September 17. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Donohew, of Millwood.

Reports from the War Department Monday revealed that two more Jackson County boys had laid down their lives on the field of combat in Europe, one being killed in action and the other one succumbing to mortal wounds received while in the line of duty. Mr. and Mrs. Holland Koontz, of Kenna, received a telegram informing them that their son, Rex Koontz, had died of his wounds on September 1. They had received notification last week that he had been seriously wounded. The telegram received Monday was the first information they had received since the telegram a week earlier which had informed them of his serious conditions. The other telegram came to Mrs. Virginia Paugh, of Ripley, informing her that her husband, Pvt. Clarence Paugh was killed in action in France on September 16. He was with the forces which invaded southern France several weeks ago. The widow and small daughter lives at Ripley. Other relatives include the young man's mother, Mrs. G.H. Sayre, a sister, Miss Lucille Paugh, and a brother, City Officer Herman Paugh, of Ripley. [Although records had not been examined it was claimed that Clarence Paugh, killed in France, was the first father in the county to lose his life in the present war. He was the father of a little daughter who was with her mother at the home in Ripley.] Paugh had only been overseas a short time before the invasion of southern France in which he participated, but Koontz had been overseas for some time before the invasion of Normandy in June, friends of the family said.

Lt. Col. E. H. Starcher, son of Mrs. Tennie Starcher, of Ripley, and who is serving in the U.S. Army Medical Cores in China, has written the members of his family a letter concerning his work in that far off land, and also telling them something of the conditions under which the work is carried on by the medical team.

Hal Leonard, son of Mrs. Vergie L. Sayre, of Ravenswood, arrived home Saturday from his Army duties. Mr. Leonard had been honorably discharged due to physical disabilities. Mr. Leonard barbered in the Army and had been overseas for six months and was discharged from a camp in Texas. (Friday, Oct.6, 1944)

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The grim specter of war came home to another seven homes in Jackson County last night as more heroic young men had made the supreme sacrifice in battle, and others were wounded while following their country’s flag into the thickest of the fighting. Four young men were dead and another three had been wounded, one of them seriously.

The dead are:

Wallie L. DeVault, foster son of Mrs. George Howell, of Cottageville, RFD No. 1, killed in France, July 22.

Samuel Balch, son of Mrs. D.O. Balch and the husband of the former Avis Baker, of Cottageville, killed Sept 15.

Pvt. Charles B. Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. George L. Hall, of Kenna, died of his wounds in Belgium, September 10.

The wounded are:

Pvt. John D. Bradham, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Bradham, of Gay, slightly wounded in France, September 19.

Pvt. Sanford Duff, son of Jessie Lee Counts, of Fletcher, seriously wounded in Italy, September 22. (Lost a leg.)

Relatives said that DeVault had gone overseas about May 1 and that he was with the second wave of assault troops in the invasion of France in June and that he had been engaged in many of the battles which wrested France from Nazi control before he lost his life. Balch was a son of Mrs. D.O. Balch and the late “Deb” Balch and had been in the service overseas for some time. He attended Cottageville High School and his widow, who received the message, is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Baker, of Cottageville. Hall was a 19 years old youth who went overseas early in the spring, and he had participated in the march through France and into Belgium where he received serious wounds which cost his life. He was attached to a tank battalion. Bradham, who had been wounded according to the news received by his parents, was a Technician with the Army in France, and Pvt. Duff, seriously wounded at the Italian battlefront, had been serving with the front line troops there for several weeks.

A message was received by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brotherton, of Rockcastle, who are now at Dunbar, that their son, Randall Brotherton, wounded some time ago and since brought to a hospital in New Mexico, was not expected to live.

Mrs. Maggie C. Skeen, of Kentuck, received a telegram Tuesday that informed her that her son, Pfc. Samuel O. Skeen, had been seriously wounded in Germany on September 17. With the exception of fliers who have been shot down, Skeen is the first casualty yet reported from the fighting on German soil.

Professor and Mrs. James C. Cox received a message yesterday also, that their 19 year old son, Joe Cox, had been killed in France on October 1. The father of the young man was formerly the principal of the Ravenswood High School.

Pvt. Charles Shaffer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Marcellus F. (Mary Boothe) Shaffer, of Vicars, near Belgrove, has been missing since September 15, according to a telegram received by the wife, Mrs. Mildred Shaffer. He was a well known young man of the county.

John Henry Hunter, who has served in the Navy for some time and who has been stationed in the Aleutian Islands for more than eighteen months, is at home for a thirty day leave with his mother, Mrs. Fremont Hunter, of Rockcastle.

Rudolph and Ralph Haynes, Charles Lawson and Bill Hersman, all of Sandyville, have begun their “boot training” in the Navy at the Great Lakes station. The Haynes brothers, who are twins, have one other brother, Charles L. Haynes, who is serving in the Navy. Mrs. Rudolph Haynes and her mother are with her parents at Sandyville. “Bill” Hershman is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hersman, of Sandyville and Rudolph Ray Haynes and Ralph Clay Haynes, twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Haynes, of Petersburg, formely of Sandyville.

Pvt. Elmer Click of Fletcher Hospital, Cambridge, Ohio, is spending a seven day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hobert Click.

Promotion of Walter C. Harpold, 19, of Gay, WV, from Cpl. To Sgt. has been announced at this Eight Air Force B-17 Flying Fortress Station. Sergeant Harpold is ball turret gunner on a Fortress. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elias Harpold. Before entering the AAF in July 1943, he was a student at Ripley High School, Ripley, WV. (Friday, Oct. 13, 1944)

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A letter has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Baker, of Ravenswood, from their son, Charles Baker, Jr., who was reported missing in action three weeks ago, that he is now in a rest camp and he tells them in a letter that he expects to be sent back to the states within a few weeks. Whether he had been missing in action and later reported, or whether there was some error in the report is not yet known, but the parents were relieved when they received the letter last Saturday which told them that he was in the rest camp behind the lines at the European front.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Boggess, of Liverpool, have received a message that their son, William, has been wounded in action in France and has been evacuated to a hospital in England for treatment of his wounds. He was serving in the glider infantry. No further details of his injuries are yet known. He has been overseas for some time and participated in the invasion of Normandy on D-Day.

Raymond Wolfe, son of Otho Wolfe, of Pleasant View, who was injured in an automobile accident near Odaville last Thursday night, has been taken to a veteran's hospital at Cambridge, Ohio, in an Army ambulance. He was on his way back to his base at Pensacola, Florida, when the accident occurred.

Later information concerning the death of Sgt. Joseph Cox, third son of Mr. and Mrs. James C. Cox is to the effect that the young man was killed on September 18 instead of October 1, as stated by the Herald last week. This latest information is given the Herald by the young man's aunt, M. Merrels, of Darby, Pa. She said that when Cox entered the service he was a freshman at the West Virginia Wesleyan College.

Mrs. Audrey Raines. wife of Pvt. Junior L. Raines, who was wounded in France several weeks ago, has been informed that he is now in a hospital in England, and that he will later be brought to an Army hospital in this country where he will likely be a patient "for a long time." She has not yet learned the nature of his wounds.

John A. Shinn, Jr. , who in private life was a practicing dentist in Point Pleasant, has been promoted from the rank of Captain to Major, according to an army announcement this week. He is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Shinn, and a brother of Mrs. J. Howard Smith, Mrs. Georgia Ellison, and Allen Shinn, all of Ripley.

S/Sgt. James E. Beymer, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Beymer, of Sandyville, has been commended by his commanding officer for "fine work" in a supply division in the Air Service Command Depot in England. S/Sgt. Beymer has written his parents about his recent furlough which he spent partly in Scotland. He enlisted in the Air Corps in April, 1942, and has been stationed in England since August 1, 1943.

John Campbell, Jr., son of John Campbell, of Sandyville, has been promoted from Sgt. to S/Sgt., according to an Army announcement from Elser Field, Louisiana this week.

Pvt. Kenneth Casto, 22 year old son of Jasper Casto, of Rockeastle, WV.

Pfc. Warren Cunningham, Medical Department, U.S. Army, is the son of Mrs. Martha Cunningham, of Ripley, and has been promoted to Corporal. (Friday, Oct. 20, 1944).

The people of Jackson County, like the people in every other community of the country, are paying ire blood, sweat, and tears as a price for fighting in World War II, and this week a number of additional homes are saddened by news from the fighting fronts, and in a hundred other homes fathers and mothers, wives and children, sweethearts and friends, realize while extending sympathy to those who have bereaved, that similar telegrams could and might come to their own doors at any hour, any day, any time.

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Casto, of Ripley, were notified by telegram from the War Department last Friday morning that their son, Pvt. Jennings J. Casto, had been killed in action in Luxembourg at the German front on October 3. He went overseas several months ago and for some weeks had been in the section where the going had been hard. He will be buried in the soil of the country in which he was killed, and the parents were told that additional information would be sent to them later. Casto had a wife and small child living at Sandyville.

John A. Parsons, of Given, also received a message that his son, Pvt. Elmer R. Parsons, had been slightly wounded in France on September 11.

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Taylor, of Kenna, received a telegram from the War Deparment Friday telling them that their son, Pvt. Hoyt Taylor, ha d been wounded in action in France on October 5. Taylor had been overseas for several months.

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dyer received a report Saturday that their son, William Dyer, had been killed in action in France early in September. The father is the cashier of the New Haven bank. (Friday, Oct. 27, 1944)

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Mr. and Mrs. J. E, Kittle, of Sandyville, received a letter from an Army nurse in France that their son, Rex Tittle, who was seriously wounded some time ago, is still to weak to write, but that he is improving and should be able to write them very soon.

A telegram was received Monday by Mr. and Mrs. Roy Parsons, of Liverpool, in which they were told that their soon, Delbert Parsons, had been wounded in action at the European front.

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Casto of Ripley, whose son, Pvt. Jennings Casto, was killed in Luxenbourg, have received a letter of condolence from General George G. Marshall. Mr. and Mrs. Casto told the Herald this morning that they deeply appreciate the many kind words of friends and the many acts of sympathy which they have been shown. In addition to the parents, Pvt. Casto is survived by the following brothers and sisters, Oman Casto of Ravenswood, John Casto of Ripley, Mrs. Bernice Asta of White Plains, New York; also his wife, Mrs. Audra Casto and the baby daughter, Beatrice Marie Casto, of Sandyville.

Sgt. Thurman Williamson, of Ripley, a brother to Paul Williamson, has been promoted to the rank of Sgt. for outstanding achievement while fighting with General Patch's Army in southern France. (Friday, Oct 27, 1944).

Sgt. Charles McGrew, of Sandyville, killed in action,, France, October 7.

Pfc. Elbert Wilkerson, of Sandyville, killed in action, Germany, October 7.

Pfc. Willie King, of Evans, killed in action in France.

S/Sgt. Nelson Critchfield, wounded in Germany, October.

Pvt. Ronald Bogess, of Kenna, wounded in Belgium, October 7.

Luther Oshe, of Cottageville, wounded a second time in European theatre of operations.

Louis Starcher, of Cottageville, wounded in France. October 8.

The War casualties have been mounting daily in Jackson County since last week, and already the previous high mark has been passed and almost daily new ones have come in with each report. The list up to last night was as follows:

Sgt. Charles McGrew, son of Mr. and Mrs. Armond McGrew, of Sandyville, was killed in action in France October 7 He had been in the service for about four years, spent many months in Iceland before being transferred to Europe.

Pfc. Elbert Wilkerson, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Wlilkerson, of Sandyville, was killed in action in Germany, October 7, He had been overseas with the invasion army for some time. He has a brother, Orland Wilkerson, also in the Army.

Pfc. Willie King, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John King, of Evans. has also been killed in a action at the European front, the parents have been informed by the War Department. Pfc. King was among the soldiers who invaded Africa and many other points and was also in the European invasion. He has a brother, Floyd, who is serving in the Army.

Staff Sergeant Nelson Critchfield, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Critchfield, of Sandyville, was wounded at the German front October 7, the parents have been informed.

Pvt. Ronald Boggess, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vaught Boggess, of Kenna, wounded in Belgium on October 7, his parents have been informed.

Luther Oshe, son of Mrs. Ida Oshe, of Cottageville, has been wounded at the European front the mother has been informed, Earlier in the war he was wounded and awarded the Purple Heart.

Louis E, Starcher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Starcher, of Cottageville, was wounded in France on October 8, the parents have been informed by the War Department. He participated in the Brittany campaign and had been in General Patton's army.

The reader will notice that for the most part the reports being released for publication today include only those killed and wounded on October 7. Since that time there has been bitter fighting all along the western front of Europe and our armies have been suffering casualties at the rate of several thousand each day in killed, captured and wounnded, the total list now reported to have passed the half million mark for the war.

"Bombing the Polizt oil fields in Germany was the most exciting experience I've ever encountered,” declared T/Sgt. James M. Campbell of Sandyville, WV, as he arrived at the Fort Logan Convalescent Hospital, near Denver, Colorado. Veteran of 33 combat missions as an aerial gunner. Inducted into the service December 11, 1942, T/Sgt. Campbell is entitled to wear the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, and the European Theatre of Operations ribbon. (Friday, Nov. 3, 1944).

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Pfc. Emil Nichols, of Ripley, who is serving in the Marine Corps and who was wounded while fighting in the Southwest Pacific several months ago, has been brought back to a hospital in California, arriving there last week.

Promotion of Walter C. Harpold, 19, of Gay, WV, from Sergeant to Staff Sergeant has been announced at this Eighth Air Force B-17 Flying Station. S/Sgt. Harpold is a ball turret gunner on a Fortress that has been bombing industry and military targets in support of the Allied ground forces. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elias Harpold of Gay. Before entering the AAF in July 1943 he was a student at Ripley High School, Ripley, WV.

Don Burhl Kerns, son of Mrs. G. J. Kerns, of Kentuck, is now stationed with the Navy in France. Among the places he has seen action are Caen, Cherbourg and several others, He has two brothers also in the service, Guy Kerns, also in the Navy, and Dale Kerns in the Army and now on his way overseas.

Cpl. Earl Skinner, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Skinner, of Frozen Can p, wrote his parents the other day that he was a patient in a hospital in the United States. He wrote from an Army hospital on the East coast. Cpl. Skinner was wounded in France. He was flown by airplane from somewhere in France to his hospital in America.

Cecil Carl Boyce, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Boyce, of Medina, has arrived at Camp Walters, Texas to begin trailing as an infantryman in a battalion stressing heavy weapons. (Friday, Nov. 3, 1 944)

Pvt. Troy Kay, of Evans, WV, has been awarded the Bronze Star for bravery in France. A wire man for a battalion of the 35th Infantry Division, Pvt. Kay was presented the decoration on October 5 for his bravery in remaining out in the open during an aerial bombing and strafing attack to lay wire between his battalion's command post and the one adjoining his unit as a prelude to an American attack.

Colonel Boyd Bradford Hill, Jackson County’s highest ranking Army Officer, was released from active duty, for physical disability, line of Duty, effective termination of all accrued leave, midnight December 4th, by Retirement Board at Staunton, Virginia , October 14. Col. Hill, a former Jackson County school teacher, will have a total credit of 19 years and 9 months service in the Army at the date he retires. He served in the infantry in World War I, was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve, in Sept, 1924, transferred to infantry, West Virginia National Guard in February 1928, served as a First Lieutenant and Captain, as Company Commander, Machine Gun Company, and later placed on Regimental Staff of the 150th assistent S-3 and S-2. On December 17th 1940, he was ordered to Spencer, West Virginia, and mustered in the newly recruited Anti-tank Company, and taking command he entrained with it on Jan. 26th, 1941 for Camp Shelby, Miss. On February 9th, he was appointed ass't Division Chemical Officer, and in August was made Commander of the 33th M.P.C., was ordered for duty with the Signal Corps the 17th December 1941 and later took command of the 1st Signal Training Regiment, Fort Mammouth, N. J„ at which station tae served until 17th November 1943, when he was alerted for overseas. Since that date he served in China and India, returning in July this year. Col. Hill is a graduate of the Chemical Warfare School at Edgewood Arsenal and the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia. He has the distinction of wearing four army or service insignias in one year, from Infantry to Chemical Warfare to Military Police to Signal Corps in the year 1941. Col. Hill contemplates purchasing additional acreage adjoining his farm on the left fork of Poca and hopes to return to his native county sometime in the near future.

Mrs. Mary P. Lupardus of Sandyville Rt. 3, received a telegram from the War Department last night that her husband, Pvt. Thomas P. Lupardus, had been killed in action in France on October 23. He was the father of eight children.

Report of battle casualties continue to pour into Jackso, County this week, and at press time a summary of the reports from the various communities in the county show the following: Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Herdman, of Evans, had received a telegram that their son, Dencil Herdman. had been killed in action in Italy on October 18. They received a telegram one day previous that he had been seriously wounded. The news of his death followed within a few hours.

Clyde Shoemaker, Seaman First Class, has been drowned and was buried in Allied territory, according to a message which came to his father, Thomas Shoemaker, who formerly lived in the Toppins Grove community.

Mrs. Oda Stuart, of Ripley, has received a telegram informing her that her son, Edmond Stuart, had been wounded in action at the Italian front on October 17. He has been overseas in the Italian theatre of operations for several months. (Friday, Nov. 10, 1944)

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Will Fleming, of Ravenswood, received a telegram Monday thatt his som. Pfv. David G. Fleming been wounded in action in France on October 24.

Mr. and Mrs. Finley Puckett, of Ripley, received a telegram that their son, Warren H. Puckett, had been seriously wounded in Italy on October 17.

Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Starcher, of Cottageville, have received more information concerning their son, Louis Starcher , who was wounded in France. He is now in a hospital in England and the nurse who wrote them said that he was making satisfactory progress.

Mr. and Mrs. William Davis, of Foster Chapel, have received a message that their son-in-law, Jesse Escue, has been killed in action in Germany. He had been overseas for several months. His widow is the former Opal Davis, who received the telegram telling her of the death of her husband last Saturday.

Just two days before Pvt. Dencil Herdman was killed in Italy the Army headquarters there released the following story: "Private Dencil Herdman. of Evans, West Virginia, participated in an attack which resulted in the liberation of a town after at least 12 Germans were killed and seven captured on the Fifth Army front in northern Italy recently." Herdman, member of the 349th "Kraut-Killer" Regiment of the 88th "Blue Devil" Infantry Division, entered the village blazing away with his weapon. The Jerries replied with their machine-guns, burp pistols and mortars. For more than an hour the doughboys chased the Nazis from house to house, lobbing hand grenades at the fleeing enemy. In addition to the 12 killed and seven captured, 50 more made a hasty "strategic withdrawal”, leaving behind eight machine guns. After the battle, the villagers emerged and offered the liberators a chicken dinner with vino.

Dorsel and Loraine Sayre, Seamen First Class of the U.S. Navy ,who have been with the fleet somewhere in the South Pacific for 20 months surprised their parents as well as their many friends when they arrived to their homes Friday night to spend the weekend with their parents. Dorsel is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Criss Sayre, and Loraine is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Sayre, of Evans. The two young men enlisted the same time, September 28, 1942, and have been together ever since. They left their home Monday, for Columbus, Ohio, where they will take a plane back to their base in California.

Under the provisions of Array regulations a Purple Heart is awarded to Pvt. Glrnmer Donohew. His wife, Mrs. Georgia Donohew, of Evens, Rt. 1, received this heart Nov, 1, 1944.

T/Sgt. Wade W. Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.W. Hall of Given, has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal. His wife, Mrs. Luveda Hall, lives at Kenna, WV.

Effective October 28, Captain George B Crow, Ripley, WV, was promoted to the rank of Major. He and his wife, the former Bernice Raines, of Ripley, with their son, George III, reside on post at Langley Field, Virginia.

Edwin Reynolds, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Reynolds, of Ripley, was one of the personnel from the crew of the USS Princeton who were rescued when the ship went down in the battle with the Japs off the Phillippine coast last week. In a letter to his parents, he said that he escaped even injury.

A West Virginia man has been awarded the Air Medal at this Eighth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortress station, commanded by Col. William B. David, of Calhoun, Ga.

S/Sgt. Walter C. Harpold, 20, ball turret gunner, of Gay. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elias Harpold, of Gay and was a student of Ripley, before entering the AAF in July, 1943.

Mitchell Field, N.Y., Oct. 29: Cpl. Earl E. Skinner, Field Artilleryman, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.O. Skinner, who live near Ripley, WV, arrived here by hospital plane direct from England, and has been evacuated to a hospital near his home. Cpl. Skinner, who was born in Ripley, attended school at Gay, WV., and later worked for the United Fuel Gas Company. Cpl. Skinner was inducted September 8, 1942, and assigned the 155 mm howitzer tractor-drawn Field Artillery. He went to England in March 1944, and arrived in France on July 6, just one month after D-Day. His organization was at once thrown into bitter fighting among the hedgerows of Normandy, and finally fought its way to the heavily fortified town of St. Lo. Here, on July 22, while serving in an advance observation post, he was wounded in the leg by a fragment of a German 88 shell. After being evacuated by plane to England, he was treated in an English hospital, and then flown back to America.

Now serving at this important strategic air depot from which operational fighter bases of the Eighth Air Force is supplied, is Sgt. Raymond C. Benson, 24, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Benson of Ripley, WV. A clerical worker, he has been in Britian with the Eighth Air Force service Command since July 1943. He is the husband of the former Miss Retha Hoover, of Kent, Ohio. He has two brothers in service, Fireman Kenneth E. Benson, and Machine Mate Carl E. Benson, on foreign duty with the U.S. Navy. Sgt. Benson is a 1939 graduate of Union High School, where he earned letters in basketball. (Friday, Nov 10, 1944)

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The Army Air Force Training Command announced today that Pvt. Carl F. Blair, of Ripley, WV., was graduated from the Department of Armament , of Lowery Field, Denver, Colorado. Pvt. Blair is the son of Mrs. Verta D. Blair, of Ripley, and attended Ripley High School. He entered the service on April 28, 1944, at Fort Thomas, Ky. (Friday, Nov 10, 1944).

Lt. Glen D. Smith, of Sandyville, has been promoted from the rank of 2nd Lt., to 1st Lt., according to a letter received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F.I. Smith, of Sandyville. He is in the 328th F. Cont. Sqdn., which is part of the 64th Fighter Wing operating with the 12th Tactical Air Force. He participated in the Southern France invasion. Another son, Pfc. Dale O. Smith, of Sandyville, is stationed with the Army Air Force in England. (Friday, Nov. 10, 1944)

Pvt. Arthur O. Winter, Co. B, 634 T.D. Bn., U.S. Army, in Belgium, is a brother to Ford Winter, ,of Ripley, WV. (Friday, Nov. 10, 1944)

Pvt. James F. Conner, son of Mrs. "Pat" Conner, and a grandson of E. F Conner, of Sherman, was killed in action in Holland on Oct. 25, according to a telegram received from the War Department by the mother late last night (Friday, Nov, 17, 1944).

One of the first of the many Ripley business men who laid aside their business cares to enter the armed forces is missing in action in Germany. He is Wilbur Chambers, who until he entered the service, was the owner and manager of the Kasco Feed Company on Court Street. His wife, Mrs. Bernice Chambers, received the telegram Friday from the War Department which told her that he had been missing since late in October. She had received a letter from him dated about the twentieth of Oct. in which he had told her he was with the troops in Germany.

Another casualty reported was received by John F. Parsons, of Ripley, on Sunday in which he was told that his son, Pfc. Ola C. Parsons had been seriously wounded in action in Holland on Sept 3. The report of the casualty back in Sept. was much earlier than most of them which have been received by relatives of men recently, but no explanation of the delay was given. (Friday, Nov. 17, 1944).

Lloyd Ankrum, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Ankrum, of Cottageville, has enlisted in the Merchant Marines and reported for duty at New York this (Wednesday) morning. He has been working on river boats since his graduation from Union High School in 1943 and no schooling was required arid he was sent to New York for assignment to duty. (Friday, Nov 17, 1944).

Louis Starcher, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Starcher, of Cottageville, who was wounded in the European theatre of operations some time ago, has been awarded the Purple Heart, according to an announcement made this week. He is now in a hospital recovering from his wounds.

Pfc. Walter S. Culver, son of F.D. Culver, of Sandyville, WV, who is serving in the Medical Corps has arrived safely in Belgium according to word received by relatives. Pfc. Culver entered the service in Sept, 1943 and was stationed at Camp Barkley, Texas before being sent overseas in Feb. He was sent to England, then France and is now somewhere in Belgium. (Friday, Nov. 17, 1944).

Technician Fourth Grade Ralph N. Fisher, son of Mrs. Alberta Fisher, of Kenna, is serving in the 561st Engineer Boat Maintenance Company which recently received the first Meritorious Service Unit Plaque to be awarded by Allied Force Headquarters. (Friday, Nov. 17, 1944)

Junior Brotherton of the USN came home on a short leave Oct, 18. Junior is a S 1/C Signalman on the U.S.S. Carmick. He visited his grandfather, Rev. I. J. McCollum, of Cottageville, with whom he made his home before entering the service. He attended Point Pleasant High School. He first saw action at Pearl Harbor and has been in six battles. Slightly wounded, he spent a month in the hospital. He was awarded the Purple Heart and other medals.

M/Sgt. Richard Beymer, stationed at Hendricks Field, Sebring, Florida, as a weather forecaster, recently spent a 28 day furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Beymer, Sandyville. Enroute to camp he spent a few days with his sister, Miss Freda Beymer, who is working in the U.S. Signal Corps at Arlington, Va. He has been in the service since June 1941. (Friday, Nov, 17, 1944)

Seaman 2/C W.A. "Bill" Beymer of the USN, who has completed his "boot training" at Great Lakes, Ill., arrived home Tuesday of last week to spent his leave with his wife, Mrs. Beulah. Beymer, and daughters Dona Kay and Nina of Parkersburg, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Beymer, of Sandyville. He left on Wednesday for camp for his new assignment. He has a brother Sgt. Phillip Beymer, who is now serving in China. (Friday, Nov. 17, 1944)

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Pfc. Thurman Willamson, brother of Paul B. Williamson, of Ripley, WV, has been awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action while fighting with the Third Infantry Division in France.

Ernest Asbury Maddox, Seaman First Class, son, of Mrs. Luda Maddox Bayer, Ripley, has been graduated from the Naval Air Technical Training Center, Memphis, Tenn., the Fifth Naval District here was advised today. Former Ripley High School student, he worked for the Curtiss Wright Corp. and enlisted last March 1943. He took his aviatude machinist's mate course at Memphis. (Friday. Nov. 17, 1944)

The death of Melvin Freyberger at the European front brings the Jackson County death toll in the war to forty-five, and this figure does not include some who are still reported as missing, but only includes those recorded officially dead, according to a summary of reports made here yesterday. While our fighting men on all fronts are having "hard going" during the past few days we are still paying a increasingly heavy toll in lives for the slow gains we have been making as is evidenced by the casualties being reported from day to day, and Jackson County is paying her full share in the life-blood of noble young men who are at the fighting front.

Last Thursday morning Mrs. Melvin Freyberger, who is the former Lilliar Karr, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Farr, received a telegram from the War Department that her husband had been killed in action in Germany on Oct 31. He had been overseas for more than six months and almost from the day he landed had been in the thickest of the fighting through France and into Germany. He is the father of three children: Shirley, Linda and Cynthia.

Another report which has been received was by Glenn Hall, an employee at the Ripley Postoffice. that his brother-in-law. Sgt. Ozie Staten, 30, who was fighting with an Infantry division in France was killed in action on October 12.

No further word has been received yet this week by Mrs. Bernice Chambers concerning her husband, Pvt. Wilbur Chambers, who was reported missing in action on Oct. 26. Mrs. Chambers and her small daughter, Sharon Dean, are with her parents at Otto, hopefully awaiting word that he may be a prisoner of war.

Pvt. Roy Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Smith, of Crow Summit, has been slightly wounded while serving in the Medical Corps in France and has been awarded the Purple Heart. He has sufficiently recovered from his wound to be back on duty. He entered the Army in Sept. 43, and went overseas last April. (Friday, Nov. 24, l944).

Pvt. Ronald Anderson, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Okey Anderson of Fairplain, has arrived safely overseas in the European theatre of operations. His brother, Sgt. Brady Anderson, has been overseas for more than a year. (Friday, Nov. 24, 1944)

Pvt. Junior L. Raines has been awarded the Purple Heart. at a USA Hospital in England for wounds he received Sept 14, his wife, the former Audrey Ellen Miller has received the Purple Heart. Monday Nov. 13. Pvt. Raines was with the 116 Infantry with the first invasion troop in France. He suffered a broken right leg and wounds in his back caused by shrapnel from a mortar gun. Pvt. Raines is yet in a USA hospital and will not be sent to the states until the first of the year, he will then be in a hospital here for three months or longer. The War Department has notified Mrs. Raines that he is improving. (Friday, Nov. 24, 1944).

Cpl. Olin Thompson, mail clerk, 1st Cavalry School Detachment, Fort Riley, Kansas, came home Thursday, Nov. 2, on a 15 day leave to visit with his father, O. L. Thompson and his two sisters, Misses Eva and Nive, he also visited his grandmother Mrs. Flora Spears, of Sandyville. Cpl. Thompson took his basic training at the Replacement Training Center, Fort Riley, Kansas, and was on maneuvers at Fort Brown, Texas. He has spent the last 18 months in service and says he likes it fine. Cpl. Thompson is a graduate of Gilmore High School. He also said he sees Pfc. Orville Sullivan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cla ence Sullivan, of Lockart Fork every now and then, as they are both in the same camp. (Friday, Nov, 24, 1944).

H. I. Smith, son of lair. and Mrs. I.J. Smith, of Evans, has completed nine years of service with the USN, and at the present time is aboard one of the powerful ships of the Pacific fleet.

Pfc. Robert L. Broterton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Brotherton of Given, is recuperating from wounds received in the battle of France arid is at an Army hospital in England. He was wounded during the early days of the invasion of Normandy.

Cpl. Norman Donohew, son of Mr. and Mrs Leo Donohew, of Akron, Ohio, and a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Donohew, of Evens. He graduated from Hower Trade School and the Akron University and was employed by the Firestone Rubber Company before entering the service. He is married, his wife being the former Eileen Davis, who now lives in Akron at the present time. (Friday, Nov. 24, 1944).

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Pvt. Roy Smith, who was wounded in France in Sept., has been awarded the Purple Heart. He is the so of Mr. And Mrs. Arlen Smith, of Crow Summit, WV. (Friday, Nov 24, 1944)

Warren Alderman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jasper F. (Dovie Comer) Alderman, of Advent, has been awarded the Purple Heart by the Army as a result of his being wounded in the European theatre of operations several weeks ago. The Purple Heart was received by his mother last week. (Friday, Nov 24, 1944)

Pfc. Ronald C Rhodes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Rhodes, of Belgrove, who has been missing in action at the front in Europe, is a prisoner of war in Germany, according to a telegram received this week by the parents from the Provost Marshall who said that the young man was a prisoner, had come through the office of the International Red Cross. Pfc. Rhodes has been overseas for some time and during recent weeks has been with the units in the thickest of the fighting and the latest news to a degree allays the fears of the parents that he might have met death on the field of battle.

Another message received by relatives in the county this week was that Lt. Dorwin Sayre, a co-pilot of a Flying Fortress, had been killed in action in the Europe theatre of operations on Nov 9. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Sayre, formerly of Letart, but now live in Parkersburg. This is the second time tragedy has struck the Sayre home in this war, a brother, Lt. Clyde W. Sayre, a pilot of a P-40, having lost his life at the Italian front last Dec. Lt. Dorwin Sayre was born April 23, 1919 and entered the service May 24, 1942 and was commissioned a lieutenant and given his wings last Feb, at the Army Air Field at Douglas, Arizona. He went overseas in July and had been at one of the Army Air Bases in England since that time, and had participated in many bombing missions over German lines since he arrived at the English base. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Watson “Bud” Rhodes, 29, of Ripley, a discharged veteran of this war, was fatally burned when a stove exploded in the Levi Guthrie home at Buffalo, WV. He died at a Spencer hospital five hours after the accident. He was a son of Charles Rhodes. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Sgt. Ralph Williams, of Ripley, is serving in the Army Engineers and is somewhere along the German front in western Europe. His wife, Imogene Williams, is living in Ripley. Sgt. Williams was better known to his many friends as a “Ted”. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

John K. Kerwood, son of Mrs. Winnie C. Kerwood, of Ripley, is serving in the Marine Corps and at the present time is stationed at Pearl Harbor to work at the fleet postoffice. His wife and small son are living in Ripley. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Pvt. Ray B. Monday, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otho Mondya, of Kenna, is serving in the Army in New Guinea at the present time. His two brothers are also in the service, Adrain Monday being with the Army in France, and Ronald with the Army in Africa.

Talmadge Clayton Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Clayton Parsons, of Ripley, is serving in the Navy at the present time and is stationed at one of the supply depots for the Pacific fleet in Utah. He operated the Pure Oil Service Station in Ripley before entering the service. His wife and small son are with him in Utah at the present time. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Pfc. Phillip Lockhart, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl B. Lockhart, has been serving in the Marine Corps since April 1943 and at the present time is stationed in the Hawaiian Islands. He graduated from Ripley High School before entering the service. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Recently commended by Lt. Gen. Carl A. Spats, Commanding General, U.S. Strategic Air Forces in Europe, for pre-invasion production efforts, S/Sgt. Charles Dillon, of Ripley, WV, and fellow soldier and technician, at an Air Station Command Depot in England are now basking in praise of the British press. He is the husband of Mrs. Mary Dillon, of Ripley, WV. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Creed Snyder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Snyder, of Ripley, is serving in the Navy and is now on duty in the southwest Pacific theatre of operations. His brother, Wade Snyder, was killed in the European theatre of operationa lastAugust. (Friday, Dec.1,1944).

Funeral services for Wade Snyder, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Snyder, of Ripley, will be held at the Independence church of Sandyville on Sunday afternoon, December 3, at two o'clock with the Rev. Lawrence Morris in charge. Pvt. Snyder was killed in action in the European battle last August 25, his parents were informed some weeks ago by the War Department. He is somewhere at the French front they were told. He entered the service on August 12, 1943 and went overseas last April. Surviving in addition to the parents are four brothers, Creed, who is serving in the Navy somewhere in the Pacific; Rex, Jimmy and Eddy, all at home, and two sisters, Delores and Shirley Ann Snyder. Also his paternal grandmother Mrs. Adda Snyder, of Sandyville, and his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Weekley, of Ravesnwood. (Friday, Dec, 1, 1944)

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15th AAF in Italy: M/Sgt. Oscar H. Bates, 30, son of Mr. H. Bates, of Ripley, WV, is an aircraft mechanic with a B-24 Liberator Heavy Bombardment Group which has flown over 350 combat missions. Sgt. Bates entered the service in June of 1934 and is a veteran of over two years of foreign service. He is authorized to wear the African, European, Middle Eastern Campaign Ribbon with three campaign stars, the American Defense Ribbon, and the Good Conduct Medal. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Perry Shinn, owner of the Shinn Electric Company in Ripley, who is serving in the Arm Signal Corps, has returned to duty at Cheyenne, Wyoming after spending a few days here with his wife and small son. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

The ears of many Jackson countians were held close to the radios last Wednesday afternoon as announcers related the progress of the flight of a Flying Fortress which had gone out of control with ten men aboard and was circling over a two hundred miles area in South Dakota and Minnesota, and did not crash until five hours later. Before the crash, however, the announcer said that ten parachutes had been seen floating down from the runaway Fortress and it was believed that all the crew had landed safely. While people were interested in the progress of the pilotless plane they did not realize that one of the members of that crew was Cpl. James O. Sayre, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Sayre, of Sandyville. On Thursday morning it had been definitely established that all the members of the crew, including Cpl. Sayre, had landed safely at widely separated points in South Dakota. The plane crashed near Isabella, Minnesota late Wednesday afternoon, and the ten members of the crew, had abandoned it near Marion, South Dakota five hours earlier. Minnesota forest rangers saw the plane crash at 4:45 eastern war time. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Pvt. Glenmer O. Donohew, of Millwood, was wounded in action in France on Sept. 17, but is believed to be recovering. He is a son of Mr and Mrs O.E. Donohew, of Evans. His wife and two children are living at Evans. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

T/Sgt. Clyde A. Boggess, son of W.F. Boggess, of Sandyville, has been serving in the Army since December of last year. His wife, Mrs. Mamie Boggess, lives at Sandyville.

Pvt. Joe Beymer, son of Mr and Mrs. Homer D. Beymer, of Ripley, is serving in the Army and is stationed at Camp Robinson, Arkansas. He was employed at the Kroger Store in Ripley before entering the service. His elder brother, Clair Beymer, was among the first of our soldiers to land in England. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

Captain Sidney A. Kay, son of D.A. Kay, of Cottageville, enlisted in the Army on June 11, 1941, entering the service as a private and has risen to the ran k of Captain. He is now with the Army Air Force at the Western front of Europe and has great responsibilities in connection with the operation of the air fleet. (Friday, Dec 1, 1944)

While the fighting became harder on the Western front within the past month casualties have mounted rapidly, according to announcement by military authorities and Jackson County has not been without the telegrams which came to relatives telling them of young men being killed or wounded in battle.

Mrs. Myrtle Smith, of Leroy, WV, received a telegram from the War Department telling her that her husband, Pfc. Gaylord Smith, was killed in action in France on November 16. Relatives of the family said that he entered the service in December of last year and that he had been overseas for some time when he was killed. He married about a year before he entered the Army. He is survived by his parents, Mr and Mrs. Henry Smith of Sandyville, a sister, Mrs. Aubrey Walter of Leroy, and his wife, Mrs. Myrtle Nuzum Smith, whom he married about a year before he entered the service.

Mrs. Eleanor Copen, of Sandyville, received a telegram Saturday in which she was told that her husband, Pvt. Jack Copen had been slightly wounded in action in Germany on November 14.

Mr and Mrs. Clark L. Howes, of Parkersburg, formerly of Sandyville, received a message Saturday in which they were told that their son, Pfc. Charles Howes, had been seriously wounded in France on November 3. Howes had been overseas since last March 1, and on August 25 was wounded in action but recovered quickly and returned to duty. He was awarded the Purple Heart. Relatives said the he was 19 years old, and has been serving in the Infantry since September of last year. Mrs. Anna Currey, of Sandyville, is his maternal grandmother. (Friday, Dec 8, 1944)

A Jackson County youth, Pfc. Delmer Parrish, son of Mr and Mrs. C.H. Parrish, of Frozen Camp, is one of the outstanding heros of the battle against the Japs on Leyte island in the Philippines, according to an announcement from General MacArthur’s headquarters received here Sunday night. (Friday, Dec 8, 1944)

Sgt. William H. Fleming, of the U.S. Marine Corps, was wounded in action on Pelelin Isand in the Paleau group of islands in the Pacific on October 7, according to notification received by his parents, Mr and Mrs. H.E. Fleming, of Leroy, this week. The message did not disclose the extent of his injuries. (Friday, Dec 8, 1944)

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William W. Shinn, son of Mrs. W.W. Shinn, of Ripley, and the late Mr. Shinn, was commissioned as an ensign in the Navy on November 28, at the Pensacola, Florida air base, and is still stationed there awaiting orders. Following his graduation from Ripley High School, he enlisted in the Navy Flying Corps on December 14, 1942 and was called to active duty the following April and trained at Charlottesville, VA., Troy, N.Y., and Illinois and for several months at the Florida base.

Orville Harper and Harry Brown are two of Uncle Sam’s fighting soldiers serving overseas in the European theatre. Harper is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Harper, of Cicerone, and Brown is a son of Mr and Mrs C.E. Brown, of Ripley. (Photo) (Friday, Dec 8, 1944)

Pfc. Orville B. Walker, son of Mr and Mrs. Ralph B. Walker, of Kentuck, entered the service last April. His wife, the former Miss Tressie Gandee, and their two children live at Kentuck.

A West Virginia man, now flying with the Eighth Air Force, has been awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster to his Air Medal previously won at this B-17 base. He is S/Sgt. Walter C. Harpold, 20, a ball turret gunner. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elias Harpold , of Gay, and was a student at Ripley High School before entering the AAF in July 1943. He is a member of the 388th Bomber Group, a unit of the Third Bombardment Division, cited by the President for its historic England-Africa shuttle bombing of Messerschmit aircraft factories at Regensburg, Germany. (Friday, December 8,1944).

Everett Crow son of Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Crow, of Silverton, is serving with the Army Engineers, and trained at Camp Shelby, Miss. (Fri, i12-8-44)

Clemon B Good, son of Mr and Mrs W.L. Good, of Liverpool, is serving with the fleet in the Pacific. His wife, Mrs. Belle Good, is living at Liverpool during his absence. (Fri, 12/8/44)

Raymond R. Casto, son of Mr.'and Mrs.,W.S. Casto of Given, was wounded in action in France last August, but according to last reports is recovering satisfactorily. (Photo) (Fri, 12/8/44)

Pvt. Carl T. Hunt, son of Mr and Mrs Walter Hunt, of Evans, has arrived safely overseas in the European theatre. Before embarking for overseas he had been stationed at Ft. Dix, N.J. (Photo) (Fri, 12/8/44)

Pfc. James F. Conner, 20, was killed in action in Holland October 25, according to word received from the War Department on November 14. He entered service July 12, 1943, and was stationed at Camp Collan, San Diego, Calif., in an anti-aircraft division. He was later sent to Camp Carson, Colorado, where he was transferred to the infantry. In August he was sent to the east coast from where he was sent overseas in Sept. He was in France and the last letter received by his sister, Mrs. Hazel Gorrell, was dated October 22, three days before his death, stated that he was somewhere in Belgium. Pfc. Conner was the son of Mr and Mrs. F.H. Conner, deceased. He is the grandson of E.F. Conner, of Sherman, WV. James made his home with his uncle, Daniel Bunner, of Sherman. Pfc. Conner was a graduate of Ravenswood High school with the class of 1943. He leaves two brothers, Pfc. Marshall C. Conner, helping drive the Germans away from the Rhine River, Charles Conner of Sherman, four sisters, Mrs. Hazel Gorrell, Mrs. Katherine Matheny, of Baltimore, Maryland, Mrs. Helen Cline, of Mt Vernon, Ohio and Miss Elva June Conner, of Sherman, WV. [There is also the last letter from Pfc. Conner to his sister in this paper.} (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

A young man who spent torurous hours in the hands of the Japanese in the Indian Ocean last summer before he finally dared death in an attempt to escape spent Thursday hunting in his native hills of Kenna. He is 27 year old Harold Lee, a son of the late Boyd Lee. (Friday, Dec. 15, 1944)

Clifton W. Westfall, of Gay, and Gaylord Smith, of Leroy, are two of the Jackson County men who have died on the western front in Europe, according to reports received the past few days by relatives of the two men. (Friday, Dec. 15, 1944)

Edward Hudson, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Hudson, of Ripley, was wounded in action in Germany on November 16 according to a telegram received by the parents this week. He has been overseas for some time. His unit has been in the thickest of the fighting on the western front for some time. His wife and small child are with her parents. Mr and Mrs. Guy Hersman, of Sandyville, WV. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

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The longest casualty list of any single week of the war has been compiled by the Herald last night and with reports coming in so rapidly the news staff was not certain that all had been reported, and there were other rumors of more messages which had not been thoroughly checked at press time. The list which has been checked and verified at that time showed the following:

The dead:
Chester C. Baker, of Cottageville.
Clifton W. Westfall, of Gay.
Yancey Currey, of Crow Summit.
Harry D. Allen, of Leroy and
Charles W. Shaffer, of Romance.

Wounded in action:
William F. Harrison, of Kenna.
Edward Hudson, of Ripley.
Harold C. Harmon, and
Charles B. Charmichael, both of Ravenswood.

Missing in action:
Pfc. Herman D. Rollins, of Fairplain, WV.

Sgt. Chester C. Baker died of wounds received in action in Germany on November 20, according to a telegram received by his widow, Mrs. Helen Starcher Baker, of Cottageville. He enlisted on June 28, 1943, and went overseas September 7, 1944. He was serving with the First Army and had gone through France, Belgium and Holland and into Germany. He was the holder of the Good Conduct Metal and was a machine gunner in the infantry. Before entering the service he was employed as a bookkeeper by the Gravley Motor Plow Company of Dunbar. He was a star basketball player during his years in the Union High School. His brother-in-law, Samuel Balch, was killed at the European front several weeks ago. In addition to the widow, he is survived by his parents, Mr and Mrs. J.R. Baker, of Cottageville, four sisters, Mrs. Samuel Balch of Columbus, Ohio, Miss Iris Baker, of Columbus, Ohio, Mrs. James Harless, of Cottageville, and Miss Lila Baker, at home, one brother, Hal Baker of Dunbar.

Yancey Currey, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.O. Currey, of Crow Summit, was killed in action in France on November 19. He entered the service in November 1942 and has been overseas for some time. He is survived by his widow, his parents and numerous other relatives, including an uncle, W.H. Hunter, of Ripley, WV.

Pvt. Harry D. Allen, 20 years old, a grandson of Mrs. Lucy Enoch, of Ripley, and a son of Mr and Mrs. Rollie Allen, of Leroy, but who are now living at Akron (Ohio). He was killed on the Island Leyte in the Philippines on October 26, according to the notification received by the relatives. He had been serving in the Army for 16 months prior to his death. Among the survivors are a sister, Mrs. Lucy McVey, of Palestine, WV, and his paternal grandfather, Ben Allen.

Clifton W. Westfall, who before he entered the service was a mail carrier on the Ripley-Gay Star Route, died of wounds in an Army hospital in France on November 11, according to the message received by his wife, Mrs. Genevieve Rhodes Westfall, of Ripley. He entered the service on October 29, 1943. He was the son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Rhodes.

Charles W. Shaffer, 33, was killed in action in France on September 15, according to a message received by his widow, Mrs. Mildred Jones Shaffer, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Clayton Jones, of Romance. He entered the service last March and before that had been employed by the Libby-Owens Company at Belle, WV. Surviving in addition to the widow are two daughters, Barbara June, 11 years old, and Betty Jane, 9 years old, his parents, Mr and Mrs. Marcellus (Marley and Mary Boothe) F. Shaffer, of Vicars (Roane County), a sister, Mrs. Hattie Hackney, of Huntington, and five brothers, Lawrence and Leonard, of Charleston, Paul Shaffer of Vicars, Dayton and Arthur Shaffer, of Huntington, WV.

Mrs. Mary M. Rollins, of Fairplain, received a message that her husband, Pfc. Herman D. Rollins, had been missing in action on the European front since November 18. No further information has been received.

Mrs. Gladys Harrison, of Kenna, was informed last Thursday that her son, William F. Harrison, had been slightly wounded in action at the German front on November 17, but a later message revealed that he had sufficiently recovered from the wounds to return to his Army unit. (Friday, Dec. 15, 1944)

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Mrs. Clara R. Harmon, of Ravenswood, received a telegram Saturday which informed her that her husband, Harold G. Harmon, had been seriously wounded in Germany on November 22. He is a son of H.F. Harmon, of Ripley and entered the service last spring, and went overseas in September, relatives said. His wife is a daughter of C.A. Jewell.

David Carmichael, of Ravenswood, received a telegram from the War Department Monday that his son, Charles B. Carmichael, has been wounded in Germany on November 25. Young Carmichael had been with Sgt. Baker and James Conner since he entered the service and also since he had been overseas and was with them when they were killed just a few days before he himself was wounded.

Mrs. Ann Crum, of Cottageville, has been notified that her son, Carl Crum, who was so seriously wounded that it was necessary to amputate one foot some time ago, has returned from the European theatre of operations to an Army hospital in Virginia. (Friday, Dec. 15, 1944)

George W. Parsons, son of Okey Parsons, of Given, is now on duty with the Navy after completing his training period at Bainbridge, Maryland. His wife, the former Miss Belle Skeen, is living at Ripley. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

S/Sgt. Glen B. Schoolcraft, on furlough from New Guinea, his first since he entered the Pacific theatre, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Schoolcraft. Sgt. Schoolcraft has spent 33 months in the Pacific. He received his training in Australia and went into active duty at Guadacanal as an aviation helper. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

S/Sgt. Harold C. Harpold, 20, of Gay, a ball turret gunner on an Eighth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortress, has been awarded the second Oak Leaf Cluster to his Air Medal at the 338th Bomb Group, commanded by Lt. Col. Chester C. Cox, of Superior, Wisc. He is the son of Mr and Mrs. Elias Harpold, of Gay. Before entering the AAF in July 1943 he had recently graduated from Ripley High School. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

Pfc. Dorsel Jones, of Advent, WV, married in Jacksonville, Florida, where he is stationed, to Miss Marie Good, a former employee of Boulevard Recreation Center, of Charleston, and daughter of Mr and Mrs. Troy Good, of Advent, WV. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

This picture of Pvt. and Mrs. Junior Lee Raines was taken when he was at home on furlough just before he went overseas. He was wounded during the early weeks of the invasion and has since been in an Army Base Hospital in England. He is a son of Mr and Mrs. G.M. Raines of Evans, and Mrs. Raines is a daughter of Mr and Mrs. P.R. Miller, of Rt. 1, Ripley. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944) Pfc. Elbert C. Wilkinson, killed in action in Germany on October 7, 1944, is a brother to Macil Wilkinson. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

Wilson Casto, son of Walter Casto, of Ripley, has been assigned to duty with the Navy in Virginia after completing his “boot training” at Great Lakes Naval Training Station, Ill.

Pvt. Charles Easter, son of Mrs. Blanche Easter, of Ripley, is serving in the Army and after his entry in the service last April trained at Camp Croft, South Carolina. His wife, Mrs. Justine Easter, is living in Ripley. His brother, Joe Easer, was one of the casualties in France early in the invasion. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

S/Sgt. Paul Tabor, of Sandyville, is a member of the Second Bomber Group in the Italian theatre of operations which now has 300 missions over enemy territory to its credit. The troup has dumped 18,538 tons of bombs on Axis targets and has shot down 496 enemy planes.

Pvt. Carroll H. Burdette, son of Mr and Mrs. Guy Burdette, of Liverpool, is one of the doughboys who serves under fire in General Mark Clark’s Army in Italy as a member of the “Custer” division. He is credited in an Army announcement this week with saving the lives of numerous of his comrades.

Pvt. Hobart McCollum, one of the well known young men of the Rockcastle community, is serving in the Army. His wife, Mrs. Neva McCollum, lives at Rockcastle, WV. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Dec., 10: S/Sgt. Cecil P. Morris, Harrisonville, Ohio, a member of the 166th Infantry, Fort Sill, OK, has been awarded the Good Conduct Medal. He is the son of Mr and Mrs. W.A. Morris of Gay, WV. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

The three sons of Mr and Mrs. D.E. Easter, of Ripley, are all serving in the armed forces of their country, and each chose the Navy as his branch of the service. They are: Roy Easter, who is a salvage diver on duty in the Atlantic, Dennie Easter, who is a Petty Officer and serving with the fleet in the South Pacific, and Hubert Easter, who is with the Atlantic fleet.

Chester Raymond French, of Given, son of Mrs. Janie French, of Londonderry, Ohio, is on duty with the Navy in the Atlantic. He entered the service in October 1943. His wife, Mrs. Omal French, is living at Given. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

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The 313th Station Hospital, England: Pfc. Robert L. Brotherton, 27, Given, WV, who was wounded by a German rifle bullet through the left chest during the fighting near St. Lo, France, has fully recovered. He is now taking military and physical training at the United States Rehabilitation center in England. He is the son of Mr and Mrs. Clinton Brotherton, of Given, WV. Before entering the Army, Pfc. Brotherton was a farmer. (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

Sgt. Brady Anderson, son of Mr and Mrs. Okey Anderson, of Fairplain, is praised by the London Sunday Express for his fine work as a technician with the Air Service Command in making plans for the successful invasion in Normandy. The “Express” says that “it was a world record”. In commenting on the fame which had come to him, a news announcement from the Air Service Command to the Herald this week said that Sgt. Anderson replied, “It is good to know that other people think we are doing a good job, and just to prove that praise hasn’t gone to our heads, we’re going to keep right on making such good records.” (Friday, Dec 15, 1944)

Pvt. Harry D. Allen, son of Mr and Mrs. Rollie Allen, and a grandson of Mrs. Mary Enoch, of Ripley, was killed in action in the fighting on Leyte in the Phillippines on October 26. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

A telegram was received by Mrs. Oda M. Stewart, of Ripley, on Saturday evening from the War Department in which she was informed that one of her three sons, Cpl. Edmond Stewart, was missing in action in the Italian theatre of operations on November 28. Young Stewart was a graduate of Ripley High School and was prominent in FFA and other school activities and was attending West Virginia University when he was called into service. He was wounded in action on October 17, and after recovering from his wounds returned to duty on November 7.

Mrs. Myrtle M. Pantell, of Ripley, has been notified by the War Department that her son, Pvt. Harry D. Pantell, was wounded in France on November 26. No further information has been received.

Herman Rollins, who has previously been reported as missing has also returned to duty, according to a message received by his wife, Mrs. Madaline Rollins of Fairplain.

Mr and Mrs. D.L. Carmichael, of Ravenswood, have received a letter from their son, Charles V. Carmichael, who was reported wounded last week, that his wounds are shrapnel wounds, and he is improving satisfactorily.

Elmer Parsons, son of John E. (?) Parsons, of Ripley, who is spending his fourth Christmas overseas, has been awarded the Purple Heart. He was wounded in France in September and is still in an Army hospital. His brother, Oley Parsons, was wounded in Holland during the fighting there in September.

Wayne Waybright, son of Mr and Mrs. W.H. Waybright, of Ripley, who was wounded in France on August 25, has also been awarded the Purple Heart. He is still in a hospital and has yet to regain the full use of his left arm.

Delbert Parsons, son of Mr and Mrs. Roy F. Parsons, of Meadowdale, who was wounded on September 24, has sufficiently recovered to return to duty.

Pvt. Louis F. Starcher, son of Mr and Mrs. W.P. Starcher, of Cottageville, who was wounded in the European theatre of operations several weeks ago, has been brought back to this country and is now a patient at the Stark General Hospital in Charleston, South Carolina. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

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Jackson County Roll of Honor, World War II

Rufus Henry Carney
Floyd Emerick
James Williamson, Jr
Roy Morgan
Dale Vanfossin
Claude McPherson
Dean Brown
Clinton Anderson
Derrell G. Carl
Emmett G. Ledbetter
Holly Kay, Jr.
Charles Boso
Cecil Kuhn
Lomas C. McConnell
Lester Dale Thomas
Charles L. Bonnett
Robert Bush
Pvt. Burhl Boso
Pvt. Monnie C. Casto
S/Sgt. Carl W. Stover
William C. Ramsey
Pfc. Lloyd Palmer
Dwight Archer
Henry Jones, Jr
James Kenneth Blake
Joseph Easter
George Davis
Olin Hughes
Lt. Kermit Orders
Harold Gandee
Virgil Zahrndt
Sgt. Roy L. Barnette
Wade Snyder
Lt. Morris Mills
Pvt. Golden Hill
Clarence Paugh
John Rex Koontz
Pvt. Charles B. Hall
Jennings J. Casto
S/Sgt. Willie King
Charles McGrew
Elbert Wilkinson
Thomas P. Lupardus
James F. Conner
Melvin Freyberger
Gaylord Smith
Sgt. Chester C. Blake
Clifton Westfall
Yancy Currey
Harry D. Allen
Charles W. Shaffer
Denzil Herdman
Donald A. Hupp
(Friday, Dec. 22, 1944)

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S/Sgt. Folie D. Litton, of Cottageville, Wva, recently was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service in combat in Italy. He is serving with Lt. Gen. Mark Clark’s 85th “Custer” Infantry Division. His sister, Lola M. Miller, lives in Cottageville. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

Death Record of World War I

Killed in Action:
Marine Tony Lockhart, Windy
Sgt. James A. Patterson, Ripley
Cpl. Harry E. Hill, Kenna
Cpl. Ralph McKown, Ripley
Pvt. Harry McCarty, Liverpool
Pvt. Thomas W. Balser, Ripley
Pvt. James Claude Scarbrough, Belgrove
Pvt. Harry F. Shinn, Millwood
Pvt. Kenna Davis, Mt Tell
Pvt. Ederson A. Williams, Ravenswood
Pvt. Peter King, Lone Cedar
Pvt. Arden Hopkins, Given
Mechanic Cecil Ables, Ravenswood

Died of wounds:
Cpl. Robert A. Ables, Ravenswood
Cpl. Roderick Reyburn, Ravenswood
Cpl. John Petty, Lone Cedar
Pvt. William D. Lane

Died of disease abroad:
Pvt. Walker Wright, Ripley
Pvt. Howard W. Southall, Gay
Pvt. Thomas D. Logston, Sherman
Pvt. George O. Thompson, Ravenswood

Died in Camp or elsewhere:
Pvt. Rufus Taylor, Ripley
Pvt. Don B. King, Ripley
Pvt. Harry H. Deem, Murraysville
Pvt. Clarence Kerns, Gay
Pvt. Jennings Hanley, Gay
Pvt. Warick Casto, Ripley
Pvt. Thomas M. Sheppard, Sandyville
Pvt. Roy W. Knightstep, Ripley
Pvt. Chester A. Wandling, Kenna
Dennis H. Bonnett
Richard G. Cromlish
John F. Sheppard
Boyd C. Smith

Lost at sea:
Pvt. Lawrence Palmer, Ravenswood

Total for all types, 35. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

Pfc. Kenneth Griffith, son of Mr and Mrs. A.E. Griffith, of Odaville, WV.

Martin Weekley, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Weekley, of Odaville, WV.

Cpl. Earl Holley, 22, son of Mr and Mrs. D.C. Holley, of Sandyville, is a member of B-17 Bomber Group in Italy. His wife, Marguerita D. Holley, lives at Sandyville. S/Sgt. Paul M. Tabor, whose bomber group has more than 300 missions to its credit in the Italian sector of the war, and who has been overseas as a gunner with the 15th Air Force for several months, is returning home for a furlough which he will spend with his wife, Mrs. Maxine Tabor, of Rockport. He has 50 combat missions to his personal credit, and 280 hours in the air.

S/Sgt. Lawrence R. Craft, husband of Mrs. Rosalie Craft, of Ripley. He has been overseas for 19 months. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

S/Sgt. Charles Morgan, son of Mr and Mrs. J. W. Morgan, of Elizabeth, WV, and has been a prisoner of war since April 1, 1944. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

Clp. Lawrence Shinn, son of Mr and Mrs. Clarence Shinn. (Friday, Dec 22, 1944)

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A telegram was received by Mrs. Clara Harmon, of Ravenswood, Thursday in which she was notified by the War Department that her husband, Pvt. Harold B. Harmon, had been killed in action in Germany on November 22. She had previously been notified that he had been seriously wounded on the same day which the late report gives for his death. Pvt. Harmon was a son of H.F. Harmon, of Ripley, and a brother to Ezra Harmon, well known Ripley man who is now himself in service. Mrs. Harmon is a daughter of Justice C. A. Jewell, of Ravenswood, and she and her three children are now at the Jewell home.

Mrs. Frank Ables, of Ravenswood RFD, received a message Thursday that her son, Richard Ables, has been wounded in France on Dec. 10.

Pfc. Charles L. Howes, infantryman, died Nov. 3, in France from wounds received in action the same day, according to word received by his relatives, including his grandmother, Mrs. K.S. Curry, of Sandyville. He had been overseas since last March 1, and had been previously wounded in action on August 25. He received the Purple Heart. He was 19 years old, and graduated from Parkersburg High School in 1943 and entered the service in September of the same year.

Sgt. John B. Swecker, a former teacher of Vocational Agriculture at the Ripley High School, has been wounded again on December 10 at the western front in Germany, according to a telegram received by his wife, Mrs. Emogene Swecker, of Sandyville. He was wounded some time ago, and spent several weeks in an Army hospital in England.

Pvt. William Chancey, son of Mr.and Mrs. W. T. Chancey, of Ripley, has been slightly wounded in the Pacific and has been returned to a hospital in Calif., where he arrived last week. His knee has been injured, according to the report.

Hickory E. Pyatt, son of Mr.and Mrs. Carl Pyatt, of Ravenswood, arrived home last Wednesday morning to spend a thirty day leave. He was one of the survivors rescued when his ship went down in the Pacific.

Mr.and Mrs. W.R. Dean, of Mt. Alto, have been notified that their son, Pvt. W.R. Dean, has been wounded at the German front and is now in an Army hospital in Belgium. Pvt. Dean entered the service last February and has been overseas for several months.

Mrs. Laura M. Parsons, of Ripley, has been notified by the War Department that her son, Pvt. Paul Parsons, was wounded in action in France on December 10. The Parsons family live at Breezy Hill on the Charleston Road near Ripley.

Mrs. Wanda Landfried, of Ripley, has been notified that her son, Pvt. Cecil L. (Joe) Landfried, was slightly wounded in France on December 1.

Mr.and Mrs. D.L. Carmichael, of Ravenswood, have received a letter from their son, Pvt. Charles Carmichael, who was wounded in action at the German front in November, that he has been transferred to an Army hospital in England, and that he is getting along fine, and is receiving the best of care.

Mrs. Ethel Pickens, of Ravenswood, received a telegram from the War Department Monday which informed her that her son, Pfc. Homer Currey, had been seriously wounded in Germany on December 10.

Mrs. Emogene Swecker, of Sandyville, has received a letter from her husband, S/Sgt. John B. Swecker, who was wounded a second time on December 10, that he is now in a hospital in France, and that his condition is fair. He was first wounded last July 4, soon after the invasion of Normandy. (Friday, January, 5, 1945)

The five sons of Mr.and Mrs. Boyd Fisher, of Kenna, are serving in the armed forces: Elmer is serving in the Navy and has been in Europe for two years, Hansel is in the Army in Europe, Homer is with the Army in the Pacific, Delmer is with the Army in France and Denzil is taking naval training in Virginia. (Photos) (Fri, Jan 5, 1945)

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For aiding in capturing seventeen prisoners and for saving the lives of three wounded men under constant machine gun fire, Pfc. Orville G. Kessel, of Ripley, has been recommended for the Silver Star Medal, the Soldiers Medal and Technical Sergeant rating. Kessel is being treated at Stark General Hospital, Charleston, SC, prior to his transfer to another hospital. On July 28, 1944, Kessel and another man were guarding a road block in Normandy when seven Germans came down the road. Kessel fired his automatic rifle, killing two of the enemy and forcing the other five to surrender. Just then, twelve more Germans came along, but they surrendered immediately thinking they were outnumbered. This combat patrol was found to have many machine guns and machine pistols among its weapons. Because of this action, Kessel was recommended for the Silver Star by his battalion commander. Two weeks later, on August 9, after the push from Normandy had begun, Kessel once more earned himself honors. His outfit, the 10th Inf Regiment, had been led into a trap by the Nazis. The 10th had been allowed to take three hedgerows in order to lead them into a flanking crossfire. About one-quarter of the trapped men were killed or wounded. Kessel and two others went to pull the wounded out before the Germans completed the job. Crawling under the spewing hail of machine gun bullets, Kessel reached the first casualty, and discovered that the man would have to be carried back. Picking the man up, Kessel placed him on his back and ran desperately for cover. He safely made it. Kessel returned and dragged another man out. Once more he ran back to save a buddy. This time the Germans had Kessel in their sights, and he could feel the deadly lead tearing through his fatigues. Several times he thought he was mortally wounded, but he kept going until he had reached safety. Only then did he pause to regain his strength and see how he had fared. Bullets had torn up his clothing and the raincoat attached to his belt, but he had escaped injury. For bravery above and beyond the call of duty, Kessel has been recommended for the Soldier’s Medal. Kessel joined the Army in 1934 and received training in the cavalry, field artillery and infantry. He was sent to build bases in Iceland in 1941 and from there he was transferred to Ireland in 1943. His section of the 10th landed in Normandy a month after D-Day. Several days later he was wounded in the knee by fragments from a 88mm shell but he refused to return to a hospital. On August 1, he was hit in the arm and leg while attacking in the Normandy breakthrough. Once more he refused to return to the rear lines. On August 10, at Fourgeres, Kessel was hit in the hips and arm, but he stayed on combat duty. In September, Kessel was among the first troops of the Third Army to cross the German border, but several days later his outfit was pulled back to join in the fierce fighting along the Mosel River. There the 10th encountered bitter opposition, and because they had no replacements available, they suffered severe losses. This time Kessel was badly hit in the hips by shellfire, and his fighting days were over. While in this action Kessel had to take over his platoon. He has been recommended for a platoon leader’s rating of technical sergeant. He is the son of Mrs. Belva L. Kesse, of Ripley, Route 2. (Friday, Jan 5, 1945)

Sgt. Chester C. Baker, 21, died Nov 20th from wounds received in actual combat in Germany, according to a telegram received by his widow, Mrs. Helen Starcher Baker, daughter of Mr.and Mrs. W.P. Starcher, of Cottageville. Sgt. Baker was a machine gunner with the First Army and a buddy of Pfc. Jimmy Conner, of Ravenswood, who was killed in Holland on October 25. Another of his buddies, Charles Carmichael, also of Ravenswood, was wounded on November 25, somewhere in Germany. Sgt. Baker was a graduate of Union High School, where he was a star basketball player and valedictorian of his graduating class. His brother-in-law, Samuel Balch, was killed Sept 16th in Germany, and the brother of his wife, Louis E. Starcher, was wounded October 8th, somewhere in France. (Friday, Jan 5, 1945)

Clara Virginia King, daughter of Mr.and Mrs. Cecil King, of Cottageville, has been promoted from Pfc. To Corporal.

Sgt. Oscar F. Mays, son of Mr.and Mrs. Bryan Mays, of Ripley, was graduated last week from the Army Air Force Central Instructors School at Lorado, Texax, a member of the AAF Training Command. He is now fully qualified to become an instructor at one of the nation’s several aerial gunnery schools. (Friday, Jan 5, 1945)

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The first of what people fear may be many messages from the War Department concerning casualties as a result of the German advance through our lines in Belgium came this week to Mr.and Mrs. Arthur Hupp, of Sandyville, which informed them that their son, Pfc. Donald A. Hupp, was killed in action in Belgium on December 17. That was on the day when the Nazis began their advance, and our military authorities have indicated that our losses from that day down to the present time in that sector of the war have been extremely heavy. Pfc. Hupp’s death was Jackson County’ fifty-fifth casualty of the present war, and they have mounted rapidly during the past few weeks.

At about the same time, N.M. Dent, of Rockport, received a message that his son, Pfc. Robert E. Dent, had been missing in action since Dec 13. He entered the service in Jan 1941, and had been overseas since May 1943. His mother, Mrs. Hazel Beard Dent, is deceased.

Mr.and Mrs. G.E. Parsons, of Ripley, received a telegram Monday which informed them that their son, T/4 O’Dell Parsons, a tank driver in General Patton’s Army, had been missing in action since Dec 7. He entered the service in Feb 1942, and had been overseas about a year.

Another similar telegram was received by Mrs. Ida Oshe, of Cottageville, on Monday, in which she was told that her son, Luther Oshe had been missing in action since Dec 20. He had been wounded twice since the European invasion, the last time several weeks ago, and had been back on duty on ly a shoert time. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

The home of Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas, of Ripley, was the scene of an enjoyable reunion on Christmas with two of the three sons of the family who are in the service back home for the day. Taylor Eugene Thomas, who has been serving in the Navy in the Pacific for the past four days, was home for the day for his first visit in that time, and Jack Thomas, who is also in the Navy and at Great Lakes at the present time, was home for the day. The other son, Ben Thomas, is somewhere in the Pacific. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Pvt. Burhl Pepper, son of F.C. Pepper, of Ravenswood, is serving in the army in new Guinea. His wife, the former Ruth Angus, and son, Larry, are living at Sandyville. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Carl E. Benson, Md.M.M.3/c returned to camp at Norfolk, Virginia. He is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Clarence H. Benson, of Ripley. He has been in the Navy 16 months. He left for overseas in May, 1944, and during those months he was in North Africa, Italy, and France. While in France he saw one major battle. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

The three sons of Mr.and Mrs. Forney Harpold, of Ripley, are all in the service, and are all serving overseas. They are: John Gerald Harpold, with the Navy in the Pacific; James Harpold, also serving in the Navy in the Pacific, and Billy Harpold, with the Army in Italy. They are the grandsons of Jennings Harpold, of Ripley. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Pvt.W.R. Dean, son of Mr.and Mrs. W.R. Dean of Mt Alto, has been wounded in Belgium, according to information received by the parents from the War Department. He is serving in the Infantry and entered the service last Feb, and has been overseas for some time. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Ruben Roscoe Anderson, son of Mr.and Mrs. Albert A. Anderson of Belpre, Ohio, and a grandson of the late Rev. Frank Pringle, of Given, has been in the Army for the past two years and was recently stationed in Calif. Before entering the service he was a clerk for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Pvt. Frank H. Kelso, Jr., son of Mrs. Lucy Kelso Allen, of Columbus, Ohio and a grandson of Mrs Vinton Casto, of Evans, and the only nephew of Circuit Clerk C.A. Hill, is serving as a gunner in an anti-aircraft division in New Guinea to which he was sent from Australia some time ago. He entered the service in Jan 1943 and went overseas the following Sept. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Pfc. Jack L. Barnett, son of Mr.and Mrs. Oscar Barnett, is now serving in France. He entered the service in Feb 1943 and trained at Fort Lewis, Washington, at New Mexico college and other points for eight months taking a course in chemical engineering and drawing. From there he went to Texas and later was sent overseas. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Wade F. Southall, Jr., son of Mr.and Mrs. Wade Southall, of Staats Mills, is serving in the Navy and is stationed in the North African theatre of operations. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

Ayward Pursley, son of Mrs. Zelma Pursley, of Leroy, and the late Homer Pursley, is serving with the Army in Europe. He went into service in August 1943 and went overseas last August, and since that time has been actively fighting on the western front. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

A letter to the Herald this week from William Potts, who is serving in the Marines in the Pacific, says that he noticed in the Ripley High School news some time ago that he had been killed in action, and he wanted the Herald to inform the students that such a report is false, and that he is still going strong against the Japs. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

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Mrs Alice Parson, of Belgrove, was notified by the War Department that her son, Benjamin H. Parsons, had been missing in action in Belgium since December 15.

Mrs. P.C. Jones, of Advent, was notified that her son, T/4 Emory Jones, had been wounded during the battle of Leyte in the Philippines on Dec 10. He has been in the service since early in the war and stationed in the Aleutians for a long time before being transferred to the South Pacific. He is a younger brother of Assistant County Superintendent Marshall Jones.

Mr.and Mrs. Forney Harpold, of Ripley, have been notified that their son, Jimmy Harpold, who is with the Navy in the Pacific, has been wounded,

Mrs. Vada Vesta Fisher, of Kenna, has been notified that her husband, Denzil Franklin Fisher, with the Navy in the Pacific, has been wounded in action. He is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Boyd Fisher. The relatives were warned not to divulge the names of the ships on which the men were serving.

Mr.and Mrs. J.B. Shinn, of Fairplain, have been notified that their son, Harry Shinn, who is with the Merchant Marine in New Guinea, has been seriously ill since Dec. 25. (Friday, Jan 12, 1945)

T/5 Harold F. Carney, son of Mr.and Mrs. Fred Carney, of Ripley, has been awarded the Bronze Star medal for heroic action with the Army on the European front. He participated in the invasion of Africa, Sicily, Italy, and Normandy, and is now at the front somewhere in the western sector of Europe. “For heroic achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy in the vicinity of Ste. Laurent-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. Worked voluntarily amid heavy artillery fire, boldly laid wire and established communications across mined terrain under enemy observation making it possible for artillery to give speedy support to assault units. His fearlessness and proficiency contributed greatly to the success of the invasion.” It will be noted that the citation is for heroic action on the day of the invasion of Europe when Carney was among the first of the troops to wade ashore. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

Pvt. Charles M. Shaver has been home for thirty days sick leave with his grandparents, Mr.and Mrs. C.E. Anthony, of Sandyville. He returned this Monday morning to Moore General hospital in Swannanoa, N.C. He served nine months in the southern Pacific on New Guinea. He knows what it is like to be shot at by Japs. He had three weeks combat with the Japs. He graduated from Gilmore High School with the class of 1942. Pvt. Shaver was transferred to the States for treatment of tropic skin disease. He will get a check-up and re-assignment on his return to Moore Hospital. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

T/4 Emory Jones, son of Mr.and Mrs. Perry Clinton Jones, of Advent, has been wounded in action on Leyte in the Philippines the War Department informed the parents this week. He has been in the service since early in the war and was in the Alaskan area before being sent to the Pacific.

Pvt. Darrell Fox, stationed at Ft. McClellan, Ala., Cpl. Blake L. Fox with the Army in England, and Sgt. Ray Adams Fox with the Army in Texas, are the sons of Mr.and Mrs. Dencil Fox, formerly of Evans, and grandsons of Mr.and Mrs. A.W. Sayre, of Angerona and Mr.and Mrs. John Fox, of Evans.

T/Sgt. Charles Karr, who is with the Army in Italy, is the son of Mrs. Ada Karr, of Ripley.

Pfc. Gaylord O. Smith was inducted into the Army, Dec 7, 1943, sent to Fr. Thomas, Ky., thence to Camp Shelby, Miss., where he taken the most of his training. The following summer he was transferred to Ft. Jackson, S.C., for a short time. The last of August he was sent from New York to France where he was killed in action, Nov 16. Gaylord Okey Smith, son of Henry M. and Musylla H. Smith, was born August 18, 1916. Departed this life Nov 16, 1943, aged 28-2-28. He spent the most of his life on the farm with his parents near Garfield. He attended Gilmore High School and graduated with the class of 1935. He was united in marriage to Myrtle O. Nuzum, October 4, 1941. He is survived by his wife, parents, sister, Garnett Walters and two nephews, Ronald Lee and Jummy Walters. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

Denzil Fisher, son of Mr.and Mrs. Boyd Fisher, of Kenna, and James Harpold, son of Mr.and Mrs. Forney Harpold, of Ripley, have both been wounded in action, according to advices received by the parents from the Navy Department. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

James Casto, with the Army in Italy, is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Archie Casto, of Cottageville.

Pfc. Carl R. Miller, somewhere in Belgium, is the brother of Mrs. Junior L. Raines

Elbin G. Boggess has returned to duty with the Navy on the Pacific coast after spending a 38 day leave with his parents, Mr.and Mrs. Addie Boggess, of Sissonville. His ship was sunk recently by the Japs and he was in the water for over five hours before he was rescued. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

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Fort Benning, Ga., Jan 4, 1945: Pvt. Harwood M. Day, husband of Mrs. Harwood Day of Cottageville, WV, has won the right to wear the “Wings and Boots” of the United States Army Paratroops. He has completed four weeks of jump training during which times he made five jumps, the last a tactical jump at night involving a combat problem on landing.

With the 80th Infantry Division in France: Major General Horace L. McBride, Commanding General of the 80th Division, has announced that Pfc. John R. Williams has been awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge. He is the son of Mr.and Mrs.. John W. Williams, of Rt. 7, Sherman, WV. He entered the service in Ohio on July 2, 1942.

Fort Benning, Ga.,: Arnold Alvin Casto, of Fairplain, WV, was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Officers Reserve Corps today upon successful completion of the Officer Candidate Course at the Infantry Training School at Fort Benning, Georgia. Lt. Casto is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Marvin L. Casto of Fairplain, WV. The new lieutenant enlisted in the Army on Sept 14, 1942. He held the rank of Corporal before he was commissioned. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

Pfc. Kenneth H. Bonnett, son of Mr.and Mrs. J.V. Bonnett, of Liberty, WV, has been awarded the Purple Heart. He was wounded in action in Italy some time ago, but has recovered and is back on duty with his unit. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

Rex N. Parrish, son of Mr.and Mrs. W.N. Parrish, of Gay, has been promoted to the rank of M/Sgt. He is attached to the Army Air Force in India. (Friday, Jan 19, 1945)

Pfc. Robert Brotherton, who was wounded in the fighting in France some time ago, is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Clinton Brotherton of Given, WV.

Pfc. Clara Virginia King, Women’s Army Corps, X-ray technician, is the daughter of Mr.and Mrs. Cecil C. King, of Cottageville. Pfc. King enlisted in the Women’s Army Corps on May 22, 1943, and is stationed at the Halloran General Hospital, Staten Island, New York. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

One day last week will be a day which will stand out in the years to come as one of the best days the family of Mr.and Mrs. Emory Hutton, of Belgrove, have ever experienced, and the young wife of a soldier will forever be grateful for that day. It is all because Pvt. Senit H. Hutton, who was reported missing in action on the European front on Nov 21, but who later reported back to his unit, according to information sent to the wife by the War Department, came in home without any advance notice for a 21 day furlough. He explained that he had been sent back to an Army hospital in this country for treatment of his wounds, asked and was granted the 21 days time to spend at his home. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Added to the long list of families who wait and pray for news from sons, husbands, brothers and fathers who are “missing in action” are two more family groups in Jackson County who have received that tragic news that somewhere at the front in Belgium their sons are missing. The two are : Pvt. Earnest C. Blair, of Sandyville, and Pvt. Parker Casto, Jr, of Ripley. Pvt. Blair is a son of Mr.and Mrs. C.O. Blair of Sandyville, Rt 4, and the message from the War Department stated that the young man has been missing in action in Belgium since Dec 21. The other message was received by Mrs. Neva Casto, of Ripley and the War Department informed her that her son has been missing in action also in Belgium and on the same day, Dec. 21.

Another casualty report received was that of Mrs. Myrtle M. Pantell, of Ripley, that her son, Pvt. Harry Pantell, has been wounded in action in Belgium on Jan 2. This was the second time Pvt. Pantell has been wounded, the first time being several weeks ago. He recovered from those wounds and returned to duty. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Carl Blair, son of Mrs. Vesta Blair, of Ripley, who is serving as an instructor at Lowry Field, Denver, Colorada, is expected home for a furlough next week. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

The two sons of Mrs. Esta Carpenter, of Ripley, are both in the service. Herman Carpenter is serving in the Army and is stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington, and Camden Carpenter is with the Navy in the Pacific. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Miss Mildred L. Casto, Seaman First Class, daughter of Mr.and Mrs. H.M. Casto, of Ripley, a graduate of Marshall and a teacher in the Ripley schools, enlisted last June 15 and trained at Hunter College and at Georgia State College and is now assigned to the Navy Bureau of Supplies and Accounts in Cleveland, Ohio. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Richmond, Va., Jan 22: T/Sgt. Harrell Bailey is now at the Richmond AAF Redistribution Station for processing and reassignment following nearly two years service in the Southwest Pacific theatre as a chief clerk. Sgt. Bailey, who wears the Unit Presidential Citation for the Papuah campaign, is a 1936 graduate of Ripley High School. His parents, Mr.and Mrs. Cleveland Bailey, and his wife, the former Miss Wanda Bumgardner, live at Liberty. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

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Pfc. Charles L Howes, Infantryman, was killed in action in France on Nov 3, relatives been informed. He had been overseas since last March and was previously wounded in action on August 25. His parents , Mr.and Mrs. Clark Howes, live in Parkersburg, and his grandmother is Mrs. K.S. Currey, of Sandyville. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Pvt. Wendell O. Casto, son of Mrs. Bertha Casto, of Fairplain, has arrived safely overseas in the Italian theatre of operations, according to information received by the mother a few days ago. His brother, Sgt. Jacob Casto is also in the service. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Homer McCollum entered the service in 1939 and is now with the Army in France and was recently awarded the Good Conduct Medal. Alva McCollum entered the service in Jan 1944 and is with the Army in France. They are the sons of Mr.and Mrs. Wade McCollum, or Rockcastle. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Pfc. Kenneth Bonnett, with the Army in Italy, is the son of Mr.and Mrs. J.V Bonnett of Liberty, WV. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Lt. Carl Foglesong, Jr., son of Mr.and Mrs. Carl Foglesong, formerly of Silverton, but now of Charleston, recently spent a 15 day furlough with his parents.

Victor Skeen, son of Mr.and Mrs. Edgar Skeen, of Kentuck, WV. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Oklahoma City Air Technical Service Command, Tinker Field, Okla., Jan 17: Now stationed at Tinker Field is Pvt. Warren Craton Winter, formerly of Ripley, WV. Private Winter was inducted into the service August 1944. He is the son of Mr.and Mrs. Arthur Leon Winter, of Fairplain, WV. His wife and two children reside at Rt 2, Ripley, WV. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Pvt. Carl C. Hutchinson, son of Mr.and Mrs. O.C. Hutchinson, of Ravenwood, is now serving with the Army in far off Iran. He was stationed for some time in Australia before being transferred to the Middle East Command. (Friday, Jan 26, 1945)

Late reports of war casualties received by Jackson County families up to last night showed that William W. Boggess, serving with the Navy in the Pacific, had been killed in action; Sgt. Eugene Lincicome, of Ravenswood,; Pvt. Guy W. Shaffer, of Ripley, had been wounded and two other rumors of reports being received had not been confirmed at press time. William Boggess, a well known Ripley youth, entered the service last summer and for some time had been with the Pacific fleet. His mother, Mrs. Addie Boggess Knapp, who at the present time is living in Union City, Pa. He is a grandson of Mrs. Mary McGraw of Ripley. The telegram concerning Sgt. Lincicome came to his mother, Mrs. Othell Lincicome, of Ravenswood, and stated that he had been wounded in action while fighting in Belgium on Jan 9. The telegram concerning Pvt. Guy Shaffer was received by his wife, Mrs. Gladys C. Shaffer, of Ripley, and stated that he had been wounded in action in France on Jan 7. William Boggess is survived by his mother, Mrs. W.A. Knapp, of Union City, Pa., and his father, Dr. W.W. Boggess, of Spencer, and three sisters, Mrs. Frank Rader, of Madison, Wisc., and Joan and Barbara Boggess, with the mother in Union City.

Mrs. J.G. Fox, of Ravenswood, received notice last week that Sgt. Eugene Stackpole, her nephew and the son of Mr.and Mrs. Thurman Stackpole, of Clarksburg, had been killed in action in Belgium on Jan 2. He had been in the service for three years. (Friday, Feb 2, 1945)

Sidney A. Kay, son of D.A. Kay, of Mt Alto, and a former teacher in the county schools, has been promoted from the rank of Capt, to Major, according to an Army announcement this week. (Friday, Feb 2, 1945)

The War Department has notified relatives of Dale Summers, including his grandfather, W.M. Jordan of Ripley, that the young man was killed in action in Belgium on Dec 16. Nothing had been heard from him for some time and relatives had been worried. He is the son of the late Mr.and Mrs. L.R. Summers, of Advent, and both the parents are dead, leaving his grandparents as his closest surviving relatives, except his wife, who is residing on the West coast. Relatives here sais the he had been in the service for some time and that they had known that he was in the thickest of the fighting and since no letters had been received from him in recent weeks they were fearful that something had happened. (Friday, Feb 2, 1945)

Headquarters, 13th AAF, Southwest Pacific: Cpl. Crayton C. Litton, son of Mrs. Paulina A. Glenn, of St Albans, WV, recently was presented the Good Conduct medal at an advanced southwest Pacific base of the 13th AAF, the jungle air force. Clp. Litton, whose wife, the former Leatha Winters, and three children, live at Staats Mills, WV, and had been in the South and Southwest Pacific since Dec 1943, after attending the AAF’s Transportation School,. He entered the service in August 1942. (Friday, Feb 2, 1945)


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