Formation of  Company K, 4th WV Volunteers

 

It is little known, and almost universally undocumented, that the very first formal Union military organization of the Upper Potomac was at New Creek / Piedmont  in the form of what was to become Company K of that  same 4th WV Infantry.  It was made up of men primarily from Allegany Co MD and now Mineral County WV (then part of Hampshire). The most complete local accounting of the area military units, makes no mention of this unit.[1]  It has become lost in time.  Further because it was an earlier unit and not organized as a home guard unit, it became a part of the larger national army organizations, and served with distinction at Vicksburg, Jackson, Chattanooga and the Georgia campaign.

 

Military Organization in Western Virginia

 

Union military organization in western Virginia started with the formation of the 1st VA—later to be known as the 1st WV (3 months service)  on May 25th. Justified by the formal vote of secession by the State of Virginia of May 22, the unit was accepted into service under the command of Gen. Benjamin Kelley at or near Wheeling (W)VA.  From there the organization of other western Virginia troops spread rapidly—though by what authority has yet to be understood. Most likely the Federal government, with the defacto government at Wheeling, devised the arrangement  to solicit troop in the name of the Restored Government of Virginia.  Early on, it became apparent that the first notion of “a quick trip to Richmond would solve the disagreement”, was not a correct assessment of the military situation, and troops were soon recruited on the basis of 3 years service. 

 

Union activity spread quickly—the Confederate activity had begun some time earlier.  According to the history of the formation of the next six (W)VA units, perhaps seven, the enlistment of a larger army in western Virginia began at once, with most of the units up through the 7th WV reporting enlistment dates in the early summer of 1861.  Since the state of West Virginia did not exist until its organization in 1863, all the early troops were enlisted as Virginia Troops, but remembered in history as West Virginia – and so noted in this work. 

 

On the Upper Potomac military activity began in early June with Wallace’s occupation of Cumberland (~June 10) and his subsequent  attack on Romney (June 11),  the destruction of most of the railroad bridges east of Cumberland rendering the railroad useless in that direction (~June 13), with the Confederate attack and burning  of 21st Bridge (June 19),  the reported burning of the  bridge at Westernport-Piedmont  (July 12), the Union occupation of Piedmont (July 13 to 27), and the attack and the skirmish at the Armstrong house (July 14th) at New Creek Station, now Keyser.[2]  The area was definitely feeling the effect of being “at war”. Since the military organization on the Confederate side of the Potomac had begun months before, it was now time for the Union side to react to the threat to home and property, and livelihood.

 

The Organization of the West Virginia 4th Infantry (Union)

 

One of the early Union WV military units  to form was the 4th WV Volunteer Infantry.  In the authoritative account of the formation of the 4th WV Infantry by Thomas Barton [3] of Syracuse, Meigs County, OH, concerning the troops along the Ohio River border, he states that a nucleus of organization began in his area about the first of June—probably a fallout of the limited call for 3 month troops—with the formation of a local militia company, that organized itself and directed itself in military organization and drill.  Then, he writes:

 

          “About the first of  July, Judge P. B. Stansberry and William Brown, of Pomeroy, and Ephriam Carson, of Racine, began recruiting for the fourth regiment of  West Virginia infantry   They were assisted by Britton Cook, of Syracuse, and myself.  A company was soon made up.  I joined this organization and became a member of Company E.”

 

          “Company E, was mustered into the United States services, July 22nd, 1861, and went into camp at Mason City, West Virginia.

 

Formation of Company K, 4th WV Volunteer Infantry

 

The very first organizing effort on the Upper Potomac was the formation of Company K (originally called  Company A) of the 4th WV Volunteer Infantry.

 

The Company was lead by Captain James H. Dayton of New Creek Station.  Whether men of substance as in the model described by Barton—perhaps some of the five local representatives from Piedmont that participated in the first Wheeling Convention--  were the driving force,  or Dayton himself, is uncertain, but Piedmont / New Creek was the rallying point.

 

In his pension application[4],  James H. Dayton of New Creek Station reported that on June 17th, 1861 at Piedmont VA he enrolled in the Union army. Other early enrollments repeat that date—so it is likely the first day of the recruiting activity in the area.  James Dayton was a merchant at New Creek Station, showing considerable financial position, especially for a man of merely 21 years age[5].  Dayton had established a mercantile business at New Creek, and it is reported by others that Dayton bought out the mercantile interests of E. M. Armstrong when Armstrong moved away from New Creek to take up allegiance with the south.  The representative from Hampshire County,  E. M. Armstrong had  represented  the local area’s pro-Union mood strongly at the Virginia Peace Conference of Feb – April 1861, but when the debate was lost and Virginia went for secession in the late May vote, Armstrong  moved on to southern Virginia following his state as opposed to his stated position.  He was likely gone or on the way in early June, the attempt to avoid succession having failed in the referendum of May 22.  Whether Dayton had bought Armstrong out by that time is not known.  But certainly, Dayton was a man of means with a lot to protect and it is not illogical that he would be one of the first to response to the call.  James Dayton became the Captain of the new company.  He would go on to provide meritous service in the 4th WV, rising to the ranks of Colonel in command of the full regiment. The company was initially organized as Company A, 4th Virginia Volunteers.

 

Additionally, Dayton was the son of Rev Roland Dayton, a farmer and minister located in the area of 21st Bridge, where the B&O crosses from Maryland into West Virginia just south of New Creek.   Whether there was a significant community at 21st Bridge, or if Dayton Sr just lived on his farm there with other locals,  is not known, but Dayton Sr. and his large family lived near the railroad bridge that was a much desired  target- so much so that it was occupied with the 50th Maryland Militia on guard duty at that time. And the strategic importance was  confirmed on the 19th of June  when contingents of Confederate A. P. Hill’s command working out of Romney,  attacked the militia guard and destroyed the railroad bridge, cutting off rail communication from Cumberland  to the west.[6]  The rail communications from Cumberland  to the east had already been broken in many places by the Rebel raiders about a week earlier.   Some say that the bridge burning was a “pay back” for Wallace’s earlier foray into Romney; others claim just another attempt to totally disrupt rail traffic flow.  It probably inflamed the area and made recruiting a lot easier for James Dayton.

 

Dayton’s enrollment at Piedmont began the recruitment  process on June 17th, and all further enrollments were listed as New Creek—and some on that same  June 17th date.   Apparently Dayton had a following of recruits already established, and about 20 of his company show the sign up date of  17 June  --- which is also the date of the beginning of records for the company.    Interestingly, most of the enrollees on this early date were from the Virginia area; the predominance of the later ones would be from Maryland.  The Maryland area was of course much larger from a population base at that time.

 

The enrollment continued at New Creek, and in a short time-about a month-- a complete company was raised.  There are two conspicuously busy days of recruitment—Friday July 12th and Monday July 15th.   Apparently the word was sent out that these were the days to enroll, and about 60 men enrolled on those two dates.   The enrollment was at New Creek—quite likely at Dayton’s  store--  one of the few buildings in town.  The latest July enrollment at New Creek was on July 18th--  which could be in error.  It is probable that the men moved out by train at least by the day of the July 18th , quite possibly earlier.    The men mustered in according to the official records on 20th July, at Grafton, the rail head on the line where the Union was basing its western Virginia campaign at that time.

 

Ironically as the enrollment  was in progress, Confederate activity against the Piedmont /New Creek area was at its peak, and the first Union skirmishes and occupation took place.  Piedmont was attacked on the 11th or 12th of July, and again on the 15th.  It is possible that their recruitment was some of the motivation for the attacks. The general recruitment process in western Virginia had become contentious for the Confederate cause, often based in threats and physical seizure.  Perhaps these attacks were meant to change the recruits allegiance. In response to the attacks,  Piedmont was occupied  by two companies of the 5th PA Reserve Corp and one company of the PA Bucktail Wildcats, on July 13th.  J R Sypher in his book  History of the PA Reserves[7], in describing the defense of Piedmont on the 15th, tells of  the “assistance of some troop being sent West – which might have been some of the new recruits.   Since the railroad was of no use beyond Cumberland, it is not obvious who else  would have been in the area.

 

 Troubles also occurred in New Creek Station during these times.  The earliest military action of that town was recorded as a raid on the Armstrong house, fortified by Union troops on July 14th. Several accounts record the attack in detail, though it is not in the Official Records.  Additionally a newspaper account attributed to Dayton, describes that his store was raided at the same time, as reported in the Wheeling  paper, by the Grafton correspondent. 

 

Outrages at New Creek and Vicinity----  We yesterday saw Capt J. H. Dayton, of Company A, 4h Virginia Regiment.  He confirms the report of the recent outrages perpetrated by secessionists at New Creek and vicinity, on Friday last.  After burning the bridges on Georges Creek, the rebel soldiers from the camp at Romney, went to New Creek and broke open Capt. Dayton’s store, and robbed it of not less than $10,000 worth of goods.  A Union soldier named Kelly, formerly of Cumberland, who was lying asleep on the railroad platform was instantly murdered.  The rebels took the drainers from Captain Dayton’s store and fed their horse in them.  The arrival of some Pennsylvania troops caused the thieves and murderers to beat a hasty retreat, with a loss, we regret to say, of only two men.   

 

From the Wheeling Intellingencer July 23, 1861. 

 

Note:  Although the account  claims the event happened on “Friday last” it is nearly universally attributed to the raid on New Creek Station  14 July 1861, a Sunday morning.  The other details agree with the supporting accounts.    

 

It was probably the first of many troubles to fall to Dayton’s business

 

Chronologically, the second unit to be raised in the area was the 2nd Maryland Potomac Home Brigade, recruited by Dr. B.B. Shaw at Piedmont—who reported enrolling himself on the 15th of July, 1861.  It is probable that the Company K was nearing completion, and the local enrollment activity taken over by Dr. Shaw – if in fact there was that much organization in the recruitment process. An interesting side light, Shaw had a commission from the new government of western Virginia, signed by appointed Governor Francis Pierpont and dated July 5th, 1861, to raise the 77th Virginia Militia[8]—a commission that he apparently never accepted, opting instead to enroll his charges as  MD volunteers.   Shaw’s group and a number of the West Virginia troops that would enroll after the 4th WV were to be the “home guards” as the name suggests, troops that would basically stay near their enrolled area and provide fundamentally for the local defense.  Such service was likely not guaranteed, but the groups were under that general premises.  Exactly what the premise of the recruitment of the 4th was, is uncertain.   Dayton reports that his company was to have been “A” Company of the 4th WV Infantry, and many of the early records refer to it as such,  but in November it was changed to K Company.[9]   Many of the other companies that made up the 4th were recruited along the Ohio River, on both sides of the River.  The Regiment had a mixed Ohio and West Virginia flavor to it.  Bringing in Dayton’s group in late year looked almost like a after-thought; a need to get the numbers right. At any rate, the inclusion of Dayton’s group put them into a force and structure that would see them aligned with other Ohio troops, and hence serve on a more national basis.   William Kepler in his book History of the 4th OH Volunteer Infantry, refers to the unit in his writings as the 1st WV.[10]   Early troop numbering certainly had some confusion to it.

           

After the mustering in, it is likely that  Company K  stayed at Grafton or that  general area for but a short period.  Several members who missed the enrollment at New Creek would catch up with the unit at Webster and enroll and muster in there—about 6 members. While the location of Webster is not known, it was in Taylor County, the Grafton area, as the following suggests.

 

 

On the 15th August, Dayton’s company’s  first military operations are noted in their field record—but they made no report.  Here they are referred to as Company A.  They were assisted in this action –listed as a skirmish—by the 25th Ohio Volunteers who did report and wrote:[11]

 

“August 15th—The said company [25th OH], consisting of one captain, one lieutenant and seventy –three non-commissioned officers and privates, proceeded to Webster, Taylor County, under orders to  report the company to Captain [James H] Dayton of the Fourth [West] Virginia Volunteer Infantry. Under command of Captain Dayton the battalion, consisting of Company A, Fourth [West] Virginia Volunteers Infantry, and Company F, Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers Infantry, marched to [illegible] in Marion County, [West] Virginia and surrounding country on a  scout.

 

August 16th --- Returning arrived at Grafton, [West] Virginia in the evening, having traveled by railroad cars two miles and on foot thirty-six miles in these two days. “

 

Note: Information in the brackets supplied by the editor of the government  printing office. 

 

At some point thereafter, the Company returned to the New Creek Station, and at least for a while, Dayton’s company was in charge at that location.   On the 28th of August,  Dayton wrote to General William Rosencrans, commander of the forces in western Virginia at the time:

 

 

 

 

 

General  Rozencrans   (sic)         28 Aug 1861

 

I am left here in command of this post with about 150 men and would suggest an immediate reinforcement as I understand from a reliable source that the enemy is 700 strong at Petersburg in Hardy co.   Also cavalry scouring our country think your immediate attention will greatly benefit our course. I shall do my utmost.

 

J H Dayton

Cap Co A 4th WV

 

Further, one of the enlistees reports that he was stationed at 21st Bridge in the Fall of 1861[12] - probably a reinforced guard situation after the earlier attack.  One would guess that the MD Militia unit was long gone.  

 

Sgt John Elwood[13] reported that the Old Ringgold Cavalry were moved to New Creek on August 25th—so that likely is the force that Dayton had at his disposal—his group of green recruits and the Ringgold.  Shortly after, perhaps in response to Dayton’s note, several companies of the 8th OH Inf were sent to New Creek under the command of Capt Hayes[14], raising the force to the order of 500 men.

 

The next engagement for Company K  was soon at hand.[15]  On Sept 23rd, another assault on Romney was organized—and reportedly  Company K, 4th WV Inf, Captain James H Dayton commanding, was a part of the force.  The overall force was in command of Lt Col James Cantwell, 4th OH Infantry, along with companies of the 8th OH Infantry, the Ringgold Cavalry, Co H 3rd  WV Inf, and Company K—a force reported to be about 1000 men.  The small army attacked the Confederates on the 24th, meeting a  smaller Confederate organization, in what was to be known at the Battle of Hanging Rocks.  The 4th WV Company K were reported in skirmish action on Mill Creek Mountain that morning.  The battle was significant for the time, and is well reconstructed in detail in other works. The city of Romney fell on the 25th, and was held but for a short period, when the order to retreat was given to the Federal force and they retreated—the Confederate account would say were chased out of Romney and the intervening country-side, and back to their base at New Creek Station. Surprisingly this action is not reported in the Federal official reports, but is described in detail in the Confederate reports, perhaps an indication of who claimed the moral victory.

 

The next significant military activity for the 4th  WV Company K  was based again from the New Creek area, when in early October, Gen Benjamin Kelley was ordered on October 25th   to again  attack and this time occupy Romney[16]  In a force consisting of two regiments—the 7th WV Inf and the 8th OH Inf, the Ringgold Cavalry, and 3 detached companies—of which Company K, 4th WV, Captain James H Dayton, commanding, was one--  Gen Kelley attacked Romney and overran it, taking possession of the city which he held until the December 1861.  The 4th WV is noted in Kelley’s official report; it appears that their service was in a reserve role[17] 

 

Company K was the first, and one of only two, Federal companies to be recruited in Hampshire- now Mineral County as WV units.  The second was Company I of the 10th WV organized at Piedmont by Captain James Jarboe in mid 1862.  A significant number of other western Virginia  residents did enroll in the Maryland troops on the other side of the river, and realistically the enrollment point primarily was Piedmont—the only significant town of the area at that time. The border didn’t mean much.

 

At some point most likely in November, Company K was incorporated in the larger 4th WV Infantry Regiment on the Ohio River.  This larger Regiment had been organized as mentioned previously in the summer and was then located primarily at Pt Pleasant WV for the protection in the western part of the State of the newly constituted Restored Government ,  and the recently  chosen Governor Pierpont  took  an active interest in the filling of the ranks and the deployment of the 4th  WV.  It is likely that Company  K was then moved to the west, and made up the last one or two companies to complete the ranks of the regiment. A letter date January 1862 bears the address of Camp Pierpont, Wayne Co VA.  As experienced and tried troops, having had two battle actions, and several skirmishes by late ‘61, they would have been a good addition to the regimental command.  From here the exploits of Co K blend into the larger accomplishments of the overall Regiment.

 

Beyond 1861

 

            In the “official” regimental history of the 4th WV in the autobiography of Thomas Barton,  he records the main organization of the 4th WV occurred along the Ohio River, in both western Virginia and Ohio in the summer of 1861.  Officially listed as formed from men “recruited at Mason County and neighboring counties in the State of Ohio”.  Company H was recruited in the counties along the Kanawha river and Company K was recruited at Grafton- where they mustered in.  This shows that these two companies were used to fill out the main group of the 4th WV.  The regimental history and record of muster rolls is also included in the State of West Virginia, Report of the Vicksburg Military Park Commission, Charleston WV 1923, which is abstracted in the following brief summary. It is beyond the scope of this work to describe the complete service of the Regiment;   for a fuller understanding of the Regiment’s history the reader is referred to Barton’s work.   

 

            The organizing officers of the 4th  were Col J. A. J. Lightburn of Lewis county, Lt Colonel H. H. Russell, and Major John F. Hall.  The regiment was organized near Point Pleasant WV, with recruitment from June to September 1861. It is likely that it came together in pieces, and Barton claims that several companies were camped Mason City and Point Pleasant when they were called on for their first official duty- a patrol into Roane County, at Spencer to relieve a group of home guards that were being bothered by Confederate sympathizers.  The job complete about the first of November the force, except for the detached Company E left behind to control the situation, returned to Point Pleasant. Company E rejoined the group about the first of December, and went into winter quarters with the 5th  WV  Infantry at Ceredo. 

 

            In the spring of 1862, the 4th WV was in service in the Kanawah valley, combined  in the command of General Cox. The deployment was two companies at Chapman, two at Brownstown, and two at Guyandotte, and the remainder at Charleston.  The history reports as major activity a skirmish at Beech Creek, near Logan Court House,  where a  force of 48 men were attacked by about 200 Confederates, in which Major Hall and two privates were killed.

 

            In late August, General Cox was removed to Washington for the defense of that city, and Lightburn was given command of the District of the Kanawah and command of the 4th and 9th WV,  the 34th and 37th OH and two companies of 2nd WV Cav. It was with this command that Lightburn conducted his famous “Lightburn’s Retreat” when attacked by Gen Loring, in Sept of 1862, resulting in the battle at Charleston and the successful escape, to Point Pleasant where they were reinforced.  The regiment went into winter quarters at Fayette Court House which was short lived.  In mid December the 4th WV was combined with the 30th, 37th, and 47th OH Inf, under the command of Brig Gen Hugh Ewing- probably because of the heavy population of OH soldiers in the 4th- and this predominately OH brigade was order to join Grant’s Army of the Mississippi, 15th Army Corp,  W. T. Sherman commanding. It will be remembered that Ewing was a prominent family in the political circles of OH, and in fact Ewing was the brother in law of Sherman.

 

The 4th   WV set out from Fayette Courthouse and secured transport on the Kanawah at  Gallipolis, and from there was transported via steamer down the Mississippi, passing through  Louisville on Christmas Day 1862—which must have been an eye-opener for the mountain / farm boys of the 4th.  In the Spring of ’63, Lightburn was made Brigade Commander of the combined Third Brigade of Sherman’s army, and James H Dayton was made Colonel in command of the 4th  WV   —a fairly rapid rise for a merchant boy from New Creek Station.

 

The 4th  WV joined Sherman’s army at Young’s Point LA, where they participated in digging the famous and ill fated bypass canal on the Mississippi.  From here the 4th  went on to great adventures and saw distinguished action particularly at Vicksburg. In mid May as the Federal Army moved on the positions around Vicksburg, Dayton was ordered with the 4th   WV  to join the assault, and on the 19th of May, Sherman’s army had circled the Vicksburg area, and driven the Confederate Army either off to east or primarily,  into the fortified works at Vicksburg.  In the swell of forces as they encircled Vicksburg, the honor was given to General Ewing’s command to lead the assault on Vicksburg, and hence the 4th  WV along with the 30th, 37th, and 47th OH, participated in the famous storming of the works on 19th May 1863 attacking a fortified position in the line of Cemetary Road in the face of Stockade Redan- in which 137 of its men were struck down in the first 10 minutes of the attack. Of that, 27 died in the attack and another 10 would later die of wounds. The reinforced Confederate positions held, and the assault was beaten back.  For Company K, one man died that day, and five were wounded.   The spirit of the engagement is best caught up in the report filed later by Major Charles Hipp of the 37th OH Infantry, written May 23rd , quoted in part:[18]

 

“Major Hipp, with his detachment, rejoined the regiment at the opening of the fight, when the assault on the enemy’s works was in progress. [ Ed note:  Hipp with three companies had been sent to the right flank to connect with General Steele’s Division—the 37th would have been the north most of Ewing’s command in the assault]   The regiment was then formed for the assault, with skirmishers in front, who by order of the general commanding, moved forward slowly, when the Fourth West Virginia and Forty-Seventh Ohio Regiments rushed forward, carrying with them some of our skirmishers and other on the left of the regiment.  The companies arriving, with Major Hipp, were ordered to deploy on the crest of the hill, the balance being already over, and all were ordered to halt and open fire on the enemy.  The regiment remained in the same position the whole day, constantly firing , withdrawing after night. The loss of the regiment [the 37th] this day was 3 killed amongst whom were 2 officers, and 3 wounded.”   

 

Or perhaps the report as filed by General Ewing:[19]

 

                On the morning of the 19th we took position on the right of the division. Resting on General Steele’s left, and.  At the signal, at 2 p.m., charged the works of the enemy in line of battle, the Thirty-seventh Ohio on the right, the Forty-seventh Ohio on the left, the Fourth West Virginia in the center, and the Thirtieth Ohio in reserve.  The left of our line, under Colonels Parry and Dayton, reached the enemy’s entrenchments, and the colors of the regiment waved near them until evening. [more follows] 

 

Sherman, not a man to be easily stopped, organized another assault and the 4th WV  participated in the last direct charge on the works on the 22nd of May, which was also ineffective. Sherman later settled for the siege, an effort that resulted in the conquest of Vicksburg on July 4th, 1863.  A monument has been erected at the Vicksburg Military  Park to commemorate the effort of the 4th WV, and stands today where they fought on the south side of Cemetery Road.  The Vicksburg campaign was hard on the 4th  WV.  While the loss in battle was in the order of only 30, the number lost then and later to sickness and disease was at least that number again.

 

Another area of distinguished service by the 4th WV—which has been attributed to Company K  was during the siege operation.  During that period both sides dug in with typical containment positions,  the Federals reinforced as history records by the continued bombardment of the city—to weaken or dishearten the opposition.  Another form of assault was the undermining the enemy works, and exploding the mines—perhaps to present a breach in the outer defenses.  Captain Wm Kossak, US Army, Engineers Office, filed a report of his efforts to sap and mine the emery works at the bastion in front of General Ewing’s command early in July, and reports[20]

 

                   “As I had no miners to spare for these two points, I called for General Ewing to furnish me 16 men from the 4th WV Volunteer Infantry whom I knew to be old coal miners.  These men started two mines on the night between the 3rd and 4th, one at Colonel Smith’s and the other at Col Malmborg’s sap.”    

 

It is likely that these miners came from Company K, who had a number of veteran miners from pre war days in the George’s Creek Valley, as noted in the roster notes attached.

 

After Vicksburg, the regiment participated in Sherman’s capture of Jackson MS, and later in September,  was marched to the other end of the state of Tennessee, and participated in the attack on Missionary Ridge- after the battle of Chickamauga- the Confederate defeat that opened up the south for invasion- a route exploited by Sherman.  In the Spring of 1864 a portion of the command re-enlisted as veterans and were removed to Wheeling for reassignment.  The non-veteran part of the  4th  WV combined with the 8 MO Inf and fought battles at Resaca, Dallas, and Kennesaw Mountain, on Sherman’s way to Atlanta.  The term of this non-veteran portion expired before Sherman reached Atlanta.

 

            The veteran reorganized forces were combined with the 1st WV Inf as the 2nd WV Vet Inf and were part of Hunter’s campaign in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864.  The 2nd Veteran Inf mustered out at the end of the war at Wheeling WV. 

 

The Roster and its Story

 

The roster of the 4th WV K Company as recorded in the Vicksburg Commission Report is as follows.  The listing was improved by researching the service rolls of the regiment.  A few records were not found- apparently the misspelling to great to recover.  The service rolls data is from Series M508[21]  which seems to be a research project from the Depression Era, i.e. not original documentation.  That could also lead to errors. 

 

The background information has been taken from the 1860 Federal Census, taking the best-fit data.  It is apparent that the ages are often distorted—sometimes to increase age to be eligible for enrollment, sometimes to decrease age so as to not be rejected. 

 

There was almost no descriptive data in the files for K Company.  A number of the other companies did have descriptive information.  It would appear that the data was destroyed; Capt Vance, who later commanded the company, responding to request for information, writes at one point:[22]

 

“I have had trouble verifying the records….. the Company was on a retreat from Fayetteville towards the Ohio River, and by order of Capt J A J Lightburn all the regiment and company property was ordered to be left and burnt, and in pursuant of said order…… all was burnt”      [Ed note:  this would have been the Lightburn’s retreat of August 1862]

 

Hence, much did not survive—and the descriptive record must have been part of that.  Of course, being such an early unit, it is possible that it was never recorded. 

 

Within the roster there are many stories and interpretations of interest.

 

One can see the “whole family” response to the War, or perhaps the whole family response for the need to find some steady work.  Of the 100 or so men that made up the unit, there were 17 pair of what appear to be brothers—and four of those, Kooken (Cogan), Liller, Brooks, and Feevay have three members in the enlistment.

 

One of the soldiers Thomas McGuinness was wounded at the Battle of Romney in ’61—one of the very early encounters, and was discharged.

 

John Murphy fell (physically) early in the first year of the War while on picket duty, and was disabled and discharged.

 

The Castell (Castile) brothers, John and William, deserted within the first two months- according to the service records.  Army life was not for everyone.

 

The divisiveness of the area—the split of allegiances north to south is particularly poignant in a letter from one of the soldiers, James Crawford—seeking relief for his father who was imprisoned as a spy and a traitor to the Union cause.  Apparently the Crawford family farm was outside of New Creek Station towards Romney, an area that was even more so on the cusp of the dividing line, though not for James who had joined the Union cause as a charter member of Co K.  Their farm  was visited on the return from one of the Romney battles and the father was later imprisoned for sympathies to the South.  James wrote to Major Darr:

 

Camp Pierpont [       ]   Wayne Co VA   Jan 19 186[?]

 

Major [Darr][23]

 

Dear Sir:  I take the liberty of addressing a few lines to you in reference to my Father.  Now detained as a prisoner in your city.. he has a family at home depending on his support, and are no doubt suffering at this time.  What money I get for my services in the army,  add only little to their comfort.  I am Corporal in Capt J H Dayton’s company 4th Regiment Virg Volunteers.   I know my father would like to be home if [     ] and would do whatever was  [   ]  for the Union banner.  He was [persuaded] of by the [domineering rascals]  around that country and I know sorry for it the [hearts content].  [Now] Major if you could do anything for him if only he’d get a leave of absence for a while.  I would thank you a thousands times.  Yes than you forever.  There have been a great many false statements made in regards to my Father.   Things he was never guilty of.  In our retreat from Romney in October.  When our men passed our house some of the men gave out.  they were taken in the house and cared for.  Especially one of them belonging to the 8th Ohio Regiment.  He was wounded.  He was taken in and placed on the best bed in the house and remain there several days.  He thanked them very kindly.  If I could see the Srgt I would try to get his name.  My mother also stood in the yard and handed our [provisions] as long as they lasted [thinking] nothing about what they would do for themselves.  My mother cared water bucket after water bucket as long as the [whole] column were passing. To wash their [thirsts] and wet their parched lips.  Indeed they were wet to their  [waists] when through.  They also say Major that my Father sent out my sisters to New Creek as spies which is false.  Thank God my sister would never stoop to such a mean action as that.  They did come to New Creek which is true.  But I had persuaded them. By writing to them.  To bring me some clean clothes.  That is all that brought them there.   Which if necessary I would prove to you by some of the boys .  Now Major if it is in power to do anything for  the release of my father please exercise it.  And the god above will reward you for it.  I know he will be honest and true to our cause hereafter.  He has seen his folly I know.  And will repent.   Major I mailed a letter  to my Father yesterday and addressed it to your care thinking that he would get it sooner. Now Major by your kind attention to this I will forever be grateful to you and I know the whole of the family will forever thank your.

 

I remain your obedient servant

 

James Crawford

 

Ed note:  The letter is written in near perfect English and grammar as shown except that  each sentence beginning is not capitalized—which this software will not permit to show.  The words in brackets are hard to read, and represent the best interpretation available.   Major Darr is likely Major Joseph Darr – his location is not known. 

 

It is not known if the elder Mr. Crawford was released. 

 

The Battle of Beech Creek (   1862) was tough for K Company—Thomas Lamb was killed, Sanford Liller and Fredrick Feevay taken POW and imprisoned.

 

The most noted battle action of the 4th – the assault on Vicksburg of May 19 to 22, 1863 was hard on K company—two were killed (one in action, one later died) Thomas Canfield and Thomas Carney, 4 were wounded, and one James Riley must have been one of the storied members to reach the parapet—and was taken captive. 

 

Charles Holstine was commissioned as Major of the 2nd Mississippi Colored Infantry.

 

But the most notable story is the illness, suffering, and death due to disease.  Of the company, 18 died of disease – or about 15%-- and the primary cause was chronic diarrhea—from the bad water and poor sanitary conditions that they had to endure.  Many of the records indicate periods of hospitalization, some extensive.   In fact, as few records are remarkable in that there is no hospitalization noted. I have marked these, though not universally, with the notation of “clear record”.  The number is small.

 

 

Tom Kooken

At North Andover MA  30 April 2004

 


 

 

Soldier

Age

Background

Rank

Enrolled

Mustered

Personal Notes

Service Notes

Dayton James

24

Merchant from New Creek WV

Capt

Jun 17 1861  at Piedmont

July 20, 1861

 

Promoted to Colonel 4th WV Inf, March 1863, command of entire regiment

Mansell James

32

RR Conductor born England, PO Westernport, family lived Cumberland

Capt

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Promoted to Captain in command of K Company, Mar 1863

Beall, Alpheus

21

Prob Farmer PO Cumberland--- father lives there

1st Lt

 

July 20, 1861

Wounded at Vicksburg

Promoted to Adjutant Sept ‘63

Clise Enoch

20

Blacksmith , PO Cumberland

1st Lt

July 24, 1861  at Webster Va

July 20, 1861

Gun shot wound in arm July ‘64

 

Hartley John C

  (also Hatley)

24

Carpenter born  Hardy Co VA , also Laborer Moorefield by census

1st Sgt

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Wounded in knee at Snickers Ford Jul 18, 1864

Veteran

Mullen William

36

 

1st Sgt

July 25, 1861  at New Creek

Jul 25,  1861

Clear record

Transferred to Non Com Staff Sgt Major 22 Sep 1863

Clice John P

22

 

Sgt

July 24, 1861  at Webster VA

July 24, 1861

 

Recruit

Cogan Joseph M

 [actually Kooken]

18

Blacksmith  Bloomington MD ?

Sgt

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Cogan, John W

 [actually Kooken]

25

RR Laborer Bloomington MD ?

Sgt

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Hospitalized at Larkinville AL late ‘63

Promoted to Sgt Aug ‘63

Holstine Charles

24

 

Sgt

July 7, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Transferred to 52 USCI Sept ‘63

Promoted to Major 2nd MS

Liller William W

35

Farmer New Creek West

Sgt

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Discharged for medical disability 25 Jun 1863 at St Louis hospital

Michael James H

24

 

Sgt

Aug 20, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 29, 1861

Promoted to Sgt Sep ‘63

Recruit

Stewart Milton

19

Prob son of Milton Steward of Cassville, Logan Co  VA

Sgt

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Promoted to Sgt 24 Oct ‘61

Promote to Capt 13th WV Inf

Betz Anthony

 (also Betts)

28

Reenlisted:  miner born Germany

Corp

July 15, 1861 at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Wounded at Snickers Gap

Veteran

Fry Joseph F

21

 

Corp

Oct 24,

1861 at New Creek

Oct 24, 1861

Disabled at Newton VA 28 Oct ‘64

Recruit

Hackette William T

24

RR conductor  Georges Creek MD area, bn Howard Co MD

Corp

July 25, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Liller Sandford S

19

Farmer New Creek West

Corp

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Taken POW Beech Creek  Logan Co VA , confined Richmond to Apr ‘63

Veteran

Walsh Robert R

19

pos Apprentice cabinet maker Frostburg 17 yo, bn Strasburg VA

Corp

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Detached to band in ’62; promoted Cpl

01  Aug ‘63

Veteran

Brooks George S

21

Machinist born Lafayette Co PA

Musn

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Walsh Joseph A

23

Painter born Culpepper VA

Musn

Nov 1, 1861  at Romney

Nov 7, 1861

Attached to Quartermasters ’62, promoted to M Sgt (?)

Veteran

Ayres Ezekiel

27

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Tried by Court Marshall Oct ’63, discharged

Wounded in rt hand at Vicksburg

Baker James H

19

Born Hardy Co

Private

 

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Bickbee William P

19

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 19, 1861

Did not find this record

Veteran

Boyd Franklin T

22

RR Brakeman, Piedmont, born Allegany Co MD

Private

Aug 28, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 28, 1861

 

Veteran

Broadwaters Joseph

23

Laborer George's Creek MD area

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died at Memphis TN Jul 1863, illness May ‘63

Brooks Frisby S

18

Probably brother to Geo Brooks  above

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Discharged 25 Jul ’61—unfit to do duty

 

Brooks Solomon  C

23

Probably brother to two above; laborer bn Layfayette Co PA

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Nurse and cook in hospital Nov ’62 to ‘64

Veteran

Canfield Thomas

37

 

Private

 

July 20, 1861

Did not find this record

Died- of wounds received at Vicksburg Jul 1863

Carney Michael

22

Probably miner Westernport (died there), bn Logsford Ireland

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran. Died of consumption of lungs Westernport  Apr ‘64

Carney Thomas

20

Prob miner  Westernport area bn Ireland

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- killed at Vicksburg May 19, 1863

Castell John W      

  (also Castile)

 

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Deserted 29 Aug ‘61

 

Castell William H

 

Probably brother to above

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Deserted  fall of ‘61

 

Clark William A

23

Brickmason 4th Dist MD prob Westernport, bn Washington Co MD

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Cogan Daniel

 [actually Kooken]

21

Laborer Bloomington

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Wounded at Vicksburg in left shoulder

Coleman Daniel

21

Farmhand PO Lonaconing MD

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- at Millikans Bend LA Mar 1863 of chronic diarrhea

Crawford James

25

Probably a farmer from Hampshire Co—family lived between NC and Romney  (see letter)

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Wounded at Vicksburg in the left cheek

Critzburg Casper

45

Laborer George's Creek MD area

Private

 

July 20, 1861

 

Transferred to VRC Oct 1863

Critzburg  Christain

33

Prob brother to above

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- at St Louis  Jul 1863 of chronic diarrhea

Crow Nathan

23

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Discharged for disability at Ceredo, Jun ‘62

Danner Martin

23

Stage Coach Driver New Creek West

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

 

Dawson Henry H

21

Laborer New Creek West

Private

Aug 29, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 29, 1861

Served as cook in Reg’t hospital part of ‘63

Veteran

Dickerhoof Joseph L

27   

RR worker bn Hancock MD, prob brother to Geo Dickerhoof, hotelkeeper Piedmont

Private

Aug 16, 1861  at Webster VA

Aug 16, 1861

Lost left arm, Feb ’64,  Waggoner

Veteran

Dodson Daniel V

20

 

Private

 

Jul 1, 1862

Did not find this record

Deserted

Eisentrout Charles

  (also Isentrout)

25

Miner Georges Creek MD area, born Germany

Private

July 18, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Shot through arm above elbow

Discharged for wounds at Vicksburg Oct 19, ‘63

Everett Louis

21

Farmer born Hampshire Co

Private

Jun 18, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Feevay August

25

Miner born Germany

Private

Aug 25, 1861  prob

New Creek

Aug 25, 1861

 

Veteran

Feevay Frederick

20

Miner born Germany

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Captured at Logan Co CH (MIA at Beech Creek) Aug 6, 1862, and confined at Richmond Paroled Apr 23, 1863

Veteran

Feevay Samuel

20

 

Private

Aug 27, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 27, 1861

Left working in a coal bank in Fayetteville VA Jan ’62; never reported back to Co

Deserted at Fayetteville Jan ‘62

Floyd John

35

Prob 40 y/o laborer Frostburg

Corp’l

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Absent – sick leave Mar ‘62

Died- at Frostburg MD Apr 17, 1862 of consumption

Griffin Michael

19

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Griffin Patrick

21

Miner Georges Creek MD area

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Grim William R.

34

pos Farmer Dawson MD

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Hendrickson, James H

18

Farmer Claysvilles PO

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick in hospital Jan ‘63

Died -at Millikan Bend LA Mar 1863 of smallpox

Hudson William

48

Machine Shop laborer Piedmont

Private

Aug 7, 1861  at Webster VA

July 20, 1861

Waggoner

Died- at Green Springs VA Dec 1862 of exposure—found dead on RR car

Hunley Silas

18

 

Private

Nov 7, 1862  at Connelton VA

Nov 1, 1862

 

Recruit

Hunsley Chris

  (also Hundley)

19

 

Private

Dec 29, 1862  at Fayetteville VA

Nov 20, 1862 (?)

Sick in hospital at St Louis ’63—cured.  Transferred to invalid corp

Transferred to VRC Oct 1864

Jeffries Fernando

18

Family name was farmers in Frostburg

Private

Aug 7, 1862 at Chapmanville VA

Aug 1, 1862

 

Died- at Vicksburg Jul 27, 1863 of chronic diarrhea

Jones James

24

Prob miner  Westernport area bn Wales

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Kight James P

18

Farmhand PO Westernport  and miner bn Allegany Co MD

Private

July _, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Kight William H

21

Carpenter, Georges Creek area

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Detached to Engineeers Corp J-F ’63, Pioneer Corp M ‘63

Veteran

Lamb Thomas

23

 

Private

Jul 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- killed in action at Beech Creek VA Aug 6, 1862

Liller John C

21

Farmer New Creek West

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Veteran

Lohr John

21

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- at Millikan Bend LA Apr 12, 1863 of small pox

Longley George

 (also Longsley)

18

 

Private

Aug 25, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 25, 1861

Waggoner for the Div May ‘63

Recruit

Longley John

 (also Longsley)

22

 

Private

Jun _, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

 

Mayhew John

18

 

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Detached  as Regimental Teamster Jan ‘63

 

McDonald Peter

32

Tanner New Creek West

Private

Aug 5, 1861  at Webster VA

Aug 5, 1861

Clear record

Recruit

McGuiness Thomas

 (also McGinnis)

20

Painter New Creek West,

Born Preston Co

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Suffered gunshot wound to foot at Battle of Romney Nov ‘61

Discharged for disability, Oct ‘62

McGuire Joseph

22

Farmer born Philadelphia

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

In hospital of gunshot wound at Pt Pleasant, Oct ’62, returned to Co

Veteran

McGunigal James

 (also McGulligan)

22

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

McKinsey George W

 (also McKinzie)

22

Carpenter, Allegany Co MD

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- at Larkinville AL Jan 14, 1864 of chronic diarrhea

McKinsey Henry C

19

Prob Laborer Lower George's Creek area

Private

Aug 28, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 28, 1861

Sick in hospital early ’63 to Sept

Recruit

McMullen Angus

26

Miner Georges Creek MD area

Private

Jul 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Meek John

18

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Metts Charles O

20

Laborer Allegany Co  MD

Private

Aug 25, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 25, 1861

 

Veteran

Metts George

33

Laborer Allegany Co  MD

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick in hospital at Charleston May ’62, tebercule of left lung, consumption

Discharged for disability Jan ’63 at Gallipolis

Miller Henry T

21

Farmer , Hampshire Co

Private

Sep 20, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861 (?)

Detached as fifer

Veteran

Miller Moses

25

pos farmhand 28 y/o Cumberland, or possible brother to above

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick Aug ’62 sent to hospital Charleston

Died- on steamboat Von Publ Jan 28, 1863, on way to St Louis, of pneumonia

Montgomery John

22

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

On detached duty Nov ’62 working on coal bank at Fayetteville VA

Deserted – never returned to company

Moore William

 (also Moor)

38

Day Laborer Piedmont bn Baltimore

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

On furlough Aug 6, ‘63

Died- at Piedmont Sep 1, 1863 of chronic diarrhea

Murphy John

24

Born Irelend

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Injured in fall while on picket duty and has not been able to perform any duty of any consequence

Discharged for disability Apr 12, ‘62

Murry David

19

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Nurse in hospital at Chickasaw Bluff  M/J ‘63

Furlough Aug 16, ’63, sick in hospital at Clarysville MD—never returned to service

Newman Henry C

20

Miner, bn Allegany Co MD

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- at Camp Sherman MS, Aug 27, 1863 of chronic diarrhea

Nolen Martin

26

 

Private

July _, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Oneal Hugh

30

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Nov sick in hospital at Paduka (sic) KY – returned to unit

 

Owens George

18

 

Private

Sep 1, 1862  at Camp Hill VA

Aug 1, 1862 ?

Deserted unit in Jan ‘63, and returned in Jun ’63.  Sick in hospital Nov’62

Recruit

Paris James

21

Farmer New Creek West, bn Hampshire Co

Private

Sep 20, 1861  at New Creek

Sep 20, 1861

Sick in hospital M/J ’63, sent to Memphis, returned to unit

Veteran

Poehm Charles

 (also Poem)

34

Rope maker bn Germany

Private

Aug 25, 1861  at New Creek

Aug 25, 1861

Sick Sep ‘63

Died- at Webster Hosp TN (Memphis), Oct  24, 1863 of chronic dirrrhea

Powers John

21

 

Private

Sep 10, 1861  at New Creek

Sep 10, 1861

Sick in hospital Sep ’62, returned; sick in hospital Jul ’64 Cumberland

Recruit

Purnell John H

24

Tailor Piedmont

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

In guardhouse  M/ A  ’63 under sentence of court marshall, hospital S ’63 Paduka  KY; hospital Memphis – never returned

 

Rankin John

22

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Rector James L

19

Railroad Laborer Piedmont, bn Fredric Co VA

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Wounded in ankle at battle of Winchester Jul 24, ‘64

Veteran

Reitzel Jacob H

 (also Ritzel)

21

Similar named family lived in New Creek Western Dist

Private

Sep 7, 1861  at New Creek

Sep 10, 1861

Clear record

Recruit

Riffe Grandville

24

Pos farmer Logan Co CH

Private

Sep 1, 1862  at Camp Hall VA

Aug 1, 1862 (?)

Gunshot wound to hand Mar 3, ’63 at Young’s Point, LA, lost thumb and forefinger; sick in hospital much of time

Recruit


Riley James

 (also Reilly)

27

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Taken POW at Vicksburg, returned from hospital Jul 63, sent to Wheeling for muster out

Wounded in mouth and breast at Vicksburg, May 19, ‘63

Riley James H

 (also Rilley)

21

 

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Died- at New Creek Oct 5, ’61 of measles

Ross Joseph W

38

Carpenter Piedmont

Private

July _, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick M/A ’62, AWOL, J/A ’62 listed deserted

Deserted Jan 7, 1863 at Louisville KY

Sebastian Frederick

 

 

Private

July 18, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Eyes too bad for service

Discharged Aug 18, 1861 at New Creek

Shaw George

28

prob Farmer, Georges Creek area

Private

July 19, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Deserted at Ceredo VA Apr 20, 1862

Sigler Jacob

20

Laborer George's Creek MD area

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick in hospital S/O ’62, again J/F ‘63

Died- at Millikan Bend LA Mar 17,1863 of consumption

Sigler John

23

Farmer bn Allegany Co MD bn MA, wife Margaret living  Barton

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick in hospital at Paduka Oct ‘63

Died- at Nashville TN Dec 7,1863 of chronic diarrhea

Smelt Andrew

19

 

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Detailed  M/A ’63 to bakery

 

Snider William

25

Prob Laborer Lower George's Creek area, noted miner bn Bedford Co PA

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Listed as deserter S ’62, arrested Dec 3and sent back to unit, present Jan ’63, S/O detached as teamster, reinlisted

Veteran

Sonenburg Louis

 (also Sonnenburg)

27

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Sick in hospital Jan ’63, returned.  Sick at Clarysville hospital Sep ’63, never returned.

 

Spiker Isaac

23

Farm laborer George's Creek area

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear  record

 

Stickley David T

20

Prob brother of below

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Stickley James W

25

Prob Farmer Hardy Co  PO Laurelton

Private

Jun 17, 1861  at New Creek Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Talford John

28

 

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Taylor Robert

19

Blacksmith, bn Bladensburg VA

Private

July 15, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Listed as deserter Oct ’62, returned to Co Apr ’63, forfeited 4 mos pay, reinlisted.

Veteran

Thomas Alfred

32

 

Private

July 21, 1861  at Webster VA

July 20, 1861 (?)

In hospital at Pt Pleasant N ‘62

Discharged for disability Jan 7, ’63 at Louisville KY

Walters John

24

 

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

 

Deserted Jan 1 at Galipolis OH, also Fayetteville, VA

Watkinson Joseph

19

Miner Georges Creek MD area, born England

Private

July 12, 1861  at New Creek

July 20, 1861

Clear record

 

Wilson William K

32

pos Blacksmith PO Oakland 28 yo

Private

Oct 24, 1861  at New Creek

Oct 24, 1861

 

Died- at Young's Point LA Feb 5, 1863 of disease

 



[1] Maxwell, Hu  and H. L. Swisher,  The History of Hampshire County, McClain Publishing Co., Parsons, WV 1897. This is generally considered the most authoritative recording of 1800’s area history.

[2] Several authors have devoted great effort to recreate the history around these events from recollected and recorded accounts notably Francis and Mark Haselberger in the middle 1960’s. These accounts are constructed from the regimental history’s of participating units and information from the Official Reports.  It is beyond the scope of this paper to repeat those but the reader is referred to:

 

The Burning of 21st Bridge, Fritz and Mark Haselberger, West Virginia History, Vol 27, October 1965, and

Skirmishes at New Creek and Piedmont   Fritz and Mark Haselberger, West Virginia History,   Vol 2

 

[3] Barton, Thomas H., Autobiography of Thomas H. Barton, Charleston WV 1890

[4] Pension Benefit File,  Col James H Dayton, 4th WV Infantry,  Mary E Dayton, wife, filed Apr 7 1892 MO

[5] Federal Census 1860  of Hampshire Co Virginia, US Archives.(microfilm) and The 1860 Federal Census of Hampshire County,  Virginia; Researched by Daniel P. Oates, Gregath Publishing Co 1990

 

[6] Official Records (hereafter OR), Chapter 9, Report of Col John C Vaughn, 3rd TN Infantry,  Skirmish at New Creek, W Va

 

[7] J. R. Sypher, History of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corp., Elias Barr & Co., Lancaster. PA 1865

[8] Sanders, Jack,  Guarding the River, the Canal, and the Railroad, McClain Publishing Co, Parsons, WV, 1998

[9] Pension Record, James H Dayton

[10] Kepler, William,  History of the 4th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Leader Pub Co., 1886

[11] Official Records,  Supplement—Records of Events, 25th OH Volunteer Inf, Company F, Volume 51 page 706

[12] Pension Record,  William H Kight, 4th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, Alice Kight wife, filed MD

[13] Elwood’s Stories of the Old Ringgold Cavalry,  John W. Elwood, Coal Center, PA 1914

[14] Military History of the 8th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Franklin Sawyers, Fairbanks & Company,  Cleveland OH 1881

[15] The Battle of Hanging Rock Pass Near Romney, West Virginia September 24, 1861, Francis E.  Haselberger, Jr., West Virginia History 25, p 1 ff.

[16] Kelley’s Occupation of Romney 1861, Fritz and Mark Haselberger, West Virginia History, Vol 28,  page 121 ff

[17] Official Records, Report of Gen Benjamin F Kelley,  Actions at Romney W. VA., Chapter 14, page 378

[18] OR Ch XXXVI, p 283-4

[19] OR Ch XXXVI p 281

[20] OR Ch 36 p 192 

[21] Service Records of Union Soldiers, Microfilm Series M508, Federal Archives, Washington DC

[22] Attached to the service record of Capt James Vance, Microfilm Series M508

[23] Probably Major Joseph Darr of the West Virginia troops.  It is not known what city he is referring to as “your city” .  About that time Darr was along the Ohio River, so they might have shipped the suspect traitor to that point.