KEYSER TRIBUNE

December 26, 1913

PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY BY THE KEYSER TRIBUNE CO
SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 A YEAR


TRANSCRIBED BY CANDY SHILLINGBURG
MARCH 16, 2003


ANTIOCH
Dec 17, 1913

Rev Henry Homan is very ill now

D G Martin and wife were at Keyser Monday

Seymour Whip of near Burlington was in this village Sunday

Surveyor D G Martin did some work last week for Charley McNeil and Amtower Bro's near Laurel Dale. He is also doing some work this week for Dr and Mayor Babb of Keyser, and G P Miller at the Mt Zion Orchard.

J M Martin was at Keyser Tuesday

Mrs Mary Cannon, widow of the late John Cannon, died Wednesday evening of last week, and was buried Friday at the home burial ground. Rev George Burgess conducted the funeral.

Earl Martin and two of our teachers, Seymour Pyles and Walter Radabaugh attended the Institute at Burlington last Saturday

Misses Eva Mott and Lulu Harrison, were at Keyser a day or two last week

Earl Martin and sister Miss Ruth, and Miss Catherine Grayson, were at Mr Charles Taylor Sunday evening.

A Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to each reader, and contributor of the Tribune is the sincere wish of-Victoria


ELK GARDEN

Well, its hustle and bustle and Christmas

Mention was made last week that Miss Freda Kerns had a finger mashed by a car window. It has given her much trouble and upon the advice of a physician, she went to a hospital at Baltimore last Monday

The Elk Garden school closed Tuesday of this week for the holidays and will open again Jan 5, 1914. Principal L O Taylor will spend the holidays in Baltimore. Mr C E Gurd at Keyser, and Miss Nina Knabenshue at Keyser.

Mr L O Taylor became leader of the junior league several weeks ago with Miss Vauda Blackburn, president. Recently Mr C E Gurd joined them in the work and has put new life in to the league. The attendance is increasing rapidly and the league is doing good work.

There was a splendid program at the Literary Society last Friday evening. It was a Christmas program. The little boys and girls recited well, class exercises by fifth grade pupils were much enjoyed, and good recitations by 6th and 7th grade pupils were good. The debate was on a heavy subject.

Resolved that the coast vessels of the US should not pay charges in going through the Panama Canal. H C Duke and Rev L C Messick affirmed and R M Dean and Wade Liller denied. Decision in favor of the negative.

Ray Blackburn, student at the S C I is home on his vacation.

Miss Alveda Ott is enjoying her vacation with her parents

Mr Loman Junkins and wife took the boy, Melvin, to Cumberland this week to have his eyes treated

A municipal ticket has been nominated with Mr Perry Streets for Mayor.

Roland


FOUNTAIN NEWS
Dec 15, 1913

As I have been absent for quite a while will try to give a few of the happenings around the Fountain.

Mrs Sam Fleek is on the sick list at this writing

Mrs Tabitha Urice spent Thursday last with Mrs H J Bailey

Miss Virgie Staggs was a welcome visit at Mrs S C Urice's last Thursday

We are sorry to say that Mr Charlie Taylor is quite ill with quinsy but hope he will soon be better

Mr and Mrs Vause Ellifritz and little daughter, Mae, of New Creek, spent Friday last with the latters brother, Edward Staggs.

Several of the Fountain people attended the Condy Social Friday night at Eureka and report a fine time.

Mr and Mrs Jacob Urice spent Sunday at Mr Charlie Harvey's

Mr Charlie Bailey from Keyser was calling on his friend Miss Green, Sunday evening.

Mr and Mrs John Urice Sundayed at J M Fleek's

Mr and Mrs James Tasker and family spent Sunday at George Miller's

Preaching at the Chapel Sunday at 3 pm.

Lone Girl


GRANT COUNTY NEWS
Press of Dec 19

Mr Ernest F Shobe and Miss Katie C Smith, of this place, were married in the parlor of the Mullen Hotel, Moorefield, on Wednesday, by Rev S G Thomas, of this place, assisted by Rev J B Henry, of Moorefield. Miss Lulu Keplinger accompanied them to Moorefield and witnessed the marriage.

W H Rohrbaugh died at his home at Hopeville on Friday night. He had been suffering from blood poisoning and a day or two before he died pneumonia developed. He was about 65 years old, and is survived by his wife and two sons, Perry and Arnold Rohrbaugh, both of Hopeville. The remains were buried on Saturday.

Mrs Martha Harper, widow of the late Wesley Harper, died Sunday night at her home at Onego. Mrs Harper was 70 odd years old. Burial took place on Tuesday in the family burying ground.

Mrs Bettie Hilkey, widow of the late Jacob Hilkey, died at her home at Laurel Dale Sunday. Mrs Hilkey was 88 years old.

Postmaster W C Smith has been quite sick this week. Geo W Mallow and H F Shank have been attending to the post office for him.

Chas T Smith, of Masonville, recently killed two hogs that netted 550 and 543 respectively.

Mrs D W Eagle and sons spent Sunday with Mrs H T Delay. They were accompanied by Mrs Ginevan and Miss Alma Paris, all were from Keyser.


HARDY COUNTY NEWS
Examiner of Dec 18

Ernest Franklin Shobe, of Petersburg, and Miss Katie Smith, daughter of Hyder Smith, of Old Fields, were married at the Mullen Hotel yesterday by Rev J B Henry.

Mrs Lucy Cunningham, of Cresaptown, Md, spent Sunday here with her brother, E C Beaty. Mrs Cunningham will go to Florida in about two weeks to spend the winter.

Dr and Mrs M F Wright of Burlington, spent a few hours with relatives here Sunday

Miss Mary Williams who has been in Romney for some time, has returned to her home here for the holidays

Mrs E M Hyde and children, of Waterford, Va, arrived this week and will spend the holidays with Mr and Mrs Arthur Cunningham.


ROMNEY NEWS
(Review of Dec 24)

Mr and Mrs Bon Poland spent Sunday with friends at Levels.

Miss Katherine French is spending the Christmas holidays with her brother on the farm.

Frank Heiskell of Three Churches was in town Monday

Mr and Mrs Paul Lynch have the finest Christmas gift in town, A BOY

Mrs W A Shannon and Miss Mary Shannon spent a part of last week with friends in Cumberland

June Kuykendall is improving daily at the Western Maryland hospital at Cumberland

Lucy Kuykendall and little daughter, Miss Lou, of Keyser are with Mrs Charles Blue

Rev Alexander Earle preached his farewell sermon to the Presbyterian congregation here last Sunday, very much to the regret of the people of this community, who hold in the highest esteem both Mr Earle and his faithful wife. Mr Earle has decided to accept a call to another field. The best wishes of their many friends go with them.

It will be to the interest to the friends of George F Turley now at Portsmouth, Ohio, but once a Springfield boy, to know that he has been recently promoted from trainmaster on the Norfolk and Western to assistant to the President to both the Virginia and Carolina. And New River, Holston and Western RR Co's. These companies are tapping some of the richest lumber and mining territory in the United States. Mr Turley will be located in Abingdon, Va.

Edward Mathews, of Wheeling, has come to spend the holidays with his grandmother, Mrs Sue Washington.

Mary and Joe Sparks are home for the holidays.


SAM PEER

A serious accident happened a few days ago near the Royal Glen Mills three miles above Petersburg. As the report has it, Mr Willis Taylor and son were driving out in a buggy on the public highway, where an automobile run up on them and frightened the horse which ran away with them, throwing both the occupants out of the buggy. Mrs Taylor escaped without injury, but the boy's skull bone was fractured in two places, and other injuries received. He was picked up unconscious, and Dr W H Siple called, who appeared and set the bones, giving such medical assistance as necessary and thinks there is a chance for the boy's life. The report also censures the conduct of the tourist. The flying machine has not yet appeared among us. We give it our favor, believing it to be the only hope which some fools have to get over the road which leads to heaven. The farming business seems to be out of commission nothing doing of that kind in the county for 20 miles and not see a hog. The mountain farmers have quit raising corn and hogs and have gone into the cross tie and bark business for a livelihood. On the days the board of public review meets, the cross tie and bark men hang around the office as thick as buzzards around the dead carcass on a June morning, asking to have the value of their lands reduced on account of the bark and ties which have been taken off of it. While the men who have been improving their lands are told that theirs must go up higher. So it appears that labor is like incomes, must be subject to tax. The artificial now in practical use, which has been substituted, for good natural sense, is playing devil in the way of reducing the cost of food stuffs. Reciprocity laws with Canada and other nations for the exchange of food stuffs at cheaper costs is the offspring of shallow brains. The people of other nations are not fools, and will never submit to a law which will subject them at home to double their costs of living, to oblige that howling mass in the United States, which does nothing for the country nor themselves but howl against the laws an attend the theaters and other places of pleasure The only way to cheapen the costs of food stuffs in America is to encourage the men on the farms to sit there and work them instead of inducing men away from the farms. The pitiless idle loitering in the towns should be driven out and sent to the farms to lend a helping hand with their labor. The supply of food stuffs to cheapen them must be equal, or more than equal to the demand. And this can only be accomplished by working the farms, making them yield their full capacity, and to do this more labor must be used on them. The people of Grant county have brought ruin on themselves. They were well, but wished to be better, and have taken railroad and tannery physic and will die. The civil war with all its horrors never brought the destruction to the country, which these two evils have brought to it. The time is not far distant when all the timber will be gone, and the county left high and dry without any resources. The men engaged in the orchard trade will be badly left. The winds from the southwest and northeast without timber to shelter the orchard, will invariably cook the fruit on the trees, either when in bloom or shortly after the bloom has fallen off, and the county will be left barren and sterile. What was once a happy and self supporting county with full supplies of cheap food stuffs, will be a thing of the past. The hillsides will be washed away by gutters, and the creeks and river will likewise destroy the bottoms. Grant county can now boast since the coming of the county, a railroad and tannery, that she is now on a par with other sections of the country, with a high class of burglars on hand. If to be in fashion as it was urged by those who give their courage to the coming of these two things makes the county prosperous and up to date in progress, she has nothing to complain of. Now by all means that class should urge the board of public works to grant charters to build dams across the creeks and rivers, and provided by the Wilson law passed at the session of the legislature in 1913, and the tragedy for the destruction of the country is finished. We favor no law which takes the right away from the railroads to fix their own prices for fare and traffic. They have been encouraged by the people to put their money in the enterprise, and no one only those concerned at the head of the business can estimate the costs and expenses to run the business with a reasonable profit. When all these woes that we have mentioned have passed in Grant county the tannery at Petersburg will then commit suicide. Not through remorse of conscience and grief for the injury done in the county to the people, but to recover the insurance on the concern, of course the suicide will be accidental, happening at a time when the hose is not in working order.

Sam Peer


DEATHS

OBITUARY

  Mrs Mary E Cannon, widow of the late Jno J Cannon, died Dec 10 1913, at her home four miles south of Antioch, W Va, at the age of 70 years, 6 months and 17 days. She leaves to mourn her loss 11 children; six boys and five girls. Dr C W Cannon, of Orkney Springs, Va; Jas L, Chas W and D H Cannon, of Antioch; R H and T M Cannon, of Burlington; Mrs J B Dugger, of Green Springs; Mrs A Ferrebee, Mrs W E Welch and Mrs F A Blackburn of Antioch; and Mrs C B Newhouse of Petersburg. Also 26 grandchildren and a host of friends.

  In the death of Mrs Cannon, Mineral county lost a highly respected Christian lady. She was a good neighbor, a kind and loving mother, always had a kind word for everyone. To know her was to love her. She was a consistent member of the U B Church which she joined more than 50 years ago. We will meet her no more in this world, but hope some day to meet her on the golden shore, to clasp hands where parting will be o'er.

  Funeral services were held Friday at her late residence conducted by her pastor, Rev Geo Burgess. Interment in the family burying grounds by the side of her husband who had proceeded her to the great beyond nearly five years ago. Five of her sons and a step son, Jno H Cannon, of Frostburg, Md, were the pall bearers. The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

CARD OF THANKS

We take this way to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness and help in the death of our loving mother, Mary E Cannon.

  The Children

MEMORIAM

In memory of Mrs Mary E Cannon, who died Dec 10, 1913

Dear mother, thou hast left us;
Your dear face we see no more.
You have gone to be an angel
On that happy golden shore.

Your chair is standing vacant,
And your kind, sweet voice is still;
But, dear friend, you can meet her
If you will only do God's will.

The river of death is dark and wide,
And she must cross is all alone;
Yet Jesus is on the other side,
To guide you to your home.

Dear mother friends would not recall you,
Though their love is very great;
Earth mishaps no more befall you,
Since beyond the golden gate.

Our loved one now is sleeping,
In the cold and silent tomb;
She has crossed death's chilly river,
But she did not fear the gloom.

By her son and daughter,
Frank and Emma Blackburn

 

E F RIDGEWAY

(We regret that the following article was by accident left out last week)
E F Ridgeway, 63 years old, B & O Conductor, died last week at his home here, after an illness of one year. He entered the service of the company in 1879. Mr Ridgeway was a native of Hampshire county. He was twice married and survived by a second wife and the following children by his first marriage: George Ridgeway, Cumberland; John Ridgeway, Pittsburg; Mrs D A Cline, Keyser; and Mrs Edward Gonder, Bellevue St, Cumberland. The funeral services were conducted at his late home and interment made at Queen's Point Cemetery.



REV L H VANDIVER

Relatives at Moorefield, W Va, were advised of the death of Rev L H Vandiver, a native of Moorefield, at Fayette, MO, aged 83. He is survived by his wife and one son, W D Vandiver, assistant treasurer of the U S at St Louis.


MARRIAGES

LICENSE TO MARRY

Robert Roy Daniels, and Marguerite Sulton, both of Barnum, W Va.

William Carr of Elkins, W Va, and Belle Wilson, of Belington, W Va

Carl William Shanholtz and Myrtle Louise Warnick, both of Shaw, W Va

Orr Denny Slane of Cold Spring, W Va and Emma Garfield Bowers, of Paw Paw, W Va

Ernest Bailey McBride of Levels, W Va and Velvia Mazie Powell, of Oknoko, W Va

Charles E Rhodes and Alice James Snider, both of Keyser, W Va

William Almond Kelly of Keyser, W Va and Arlie Elizabeth Kelley, of Moorefield, W Va

Floyd Cornelius Peyton and Essalene Guy, both of Westernport, Md

Le Roy Lonzy Grove and Nellie May Dayton, both of Westernport, Md


THE WESTERN MARYLAND RAILWAY COMPANY

Railroad men of the future will, in a large measure, be selected on account of their education qualifications and their adaptability to certain lines of work, if the aims of those who attended the Safety and Sanitation Conference in New York last week, are finally realized. This, at least, is the information imparted by Dr D Z Dunott, chief surgeon of the Western Maryland RR Co, who represented his road at the Gotham meeting. Dr Dunott asserts that the main purpose of the gatherings similar to the one just held in New York is to increase efficiency along safety and sanitation lines by raising the educational standard of railroad employees with the proper surroundings. So far at present employees are concerned, the consensus of opinion prevailing at the New York conference was that an educational campaign would likely be necessary in order to get the proper results, but that, in the future, when men enter the service, they would, of course, be selected for this or that position according to their educational or other qualifications, which would be proof of their ability to perform their duties to the satisfaction of the roads employing them. "The aim of the railroad men interested in the effort to increase efficiency in the safety and sanitation work of the railroads" remarked Dr Dunott, "is to establish some educational qualification which will require men mentally fit to fulfil their duties which they might be called upon to perform. In other words, the men given employment would be picked men, so to speak, and under an arrangement of this kind, it is believed that the very best results could be obtained. This is the goal which the safety and sanitation conference representatives are striving to reach. "But in addition to establishing a certain educational standard for employees" added Dr Dunott "The roads would have to provide their employees with the proper surroundings and the proper equipment, for, without these greatest benefits would not accrue to the carriers. It will also be necessary for the roads to educate old employees up to the new standard. This is the tendency of thought as expressed by the representatives of the carries at the New York gathering. It may take some time to bring such a condition about, but the belief is that some such plan as this would be the most effective force in production lasting results so far as safety and sanitation work is concerned on the railroads of this country."

From Leslie Rawls
Special Representatives Traffic Department


CHANGED THE SUBJECT

He had plastered his touched up hair down over his bald spot, and he had assumed the sort of smile his female friends called "childish" when he was in college. His shoes were shined, and so was his nose. And then he called on the young lady. "My object in calling on you this evening, Gertrude," he began, and then he coughed and added in a trembling voice, "I may call you Gertrude, may I not?" "Sure you can," answered the young girl. "I allow all my papa's elderly friends to call me Gertrude. The oldest of them even call me Gert. You may say 'Gert' if you wish. What was it you wanted to talk about?" He coughed again, and then talked about how much warmer it was in the summer of 1872.


COMING OVER
Washington DC

President Wilson let it be known today that some other corporations besides the American Telephone Co had shown a disposition to take the initiative in organizing to conform to the Sherman anti-trust law. He did not say what the corporations were.


25 PER CENT INCREASE
Charleston

Figures compiled by the state auditor and made public tonight show that taxes to be paid this year by the oil and gas companies operating in W Va have increased, $190,000. The various corporations will pay into the treasuries over $790,860. The Hope Natural Gas Co heads the list of tax of $189,000, an increase of about 25% over last year.


A man was firing his automobile
"Trouble?" asked a bystander
"Some" was the laconic answer
"What power is it?"
"Forty horse," came the answer
"What seems to be the matter with it?"
"Well, from the way she acts, I should say that 39 of the horses were dead."


THE LIGHT THAT FAILED

An old neighbor of ours seeing a slit skirt for the first time and fumbling despairingly in his pockets, said: "By ginger, if I ever needed my glasses, I need 'em now!"-Buffalo News


STOCKHOLDERS MEETING
Of The Thompson Furniture Co

To the stockholders of said company:

This is to notify you, and each of you, that the regular annual meeting of the Thompson Furniture Co will be held at their office, corner of Main and Center Streets, Keyser, W Va, on Thursday January the 8th, 1914, at 10:30 am.

Harry G Fisher, Secretary


STOCKHOLDERS MEETING
Of The Potomac Milling and Ice Co

To the stockholders of said company:

This is to notify you, and each of you, that the regular annual meeting of the Potomac Milling and Ice Co will be held at the office of Harry G Fisher, Armstrong St, Keyser, W Va, on Friday, January the 9th, 1914, at one o'clock pm.

Harry G Fisher, Secretary


FIDUCIARIES NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that there are before me for settlement the following accounts:

Alfred Ridgely and J W Ridgely, Executors of Charles Ridgely, deceased

Alice K Hartley, Administratix of Benjamin Haines, deceased

Samuel V Ward, Executor of C C Bosley, deceased

J T Jordan, Guardian for John D Jordan

H L Arnold, Executor of Henry J Fleek, deceased

I H Offner, Administrator of J W Wagoner, deceased

These accounts will be taken up for settlement ten days after the convening of the regular January 1914 term of the County Court of Mineral county.

William MacDonald

Commissioner of Accounts


WORTH KNOWING

Every day 40,000,000 postage stamps are manufactured, counted and made ready for shipment to our 60,000 post offices. During the last fiscal year 10,937,926,987 perfect postage stamps were delivered having a value of $185,504,556.20.


VANITY CAUSES GIRLS' DOWNFALL

"Lack of sufficient wages is the chief reason assigned for the evil of white slavery in this country, but I think that is a mistake," said Rev Frank A Killmon in a sermon delivered last night at Grace M E Church, South Cumberland. "The reason why girls are going wrong is because of their vanity, love of display in dress and because their parents are not teaching them the things they ought to know, and holding them in restraint." Rev Killmon took for his text the parable of the prodigal son. The subject of his address was "The Prodigal Girl." He criticized the "new girl" characterizing her as immodest and unworthy the consideration of any self-respecting young man. His sermon was illustrated by painting of the different events which happened in the early life of the "prodigal son" of the Bible. In his address he said:

"The white slave law is one sided. Under the law any woman can blackmail a man. There is a maudlin sentimentality among women of this day, and this sentiment is prevalent among the men, that it makes no difference what a woman does she is not to be censured. This is all wrong. Women must share the responsibilities of criticism for their wrongful acts the same as a man. "The principle underlying the white slave laws is that man alone is to blame for a girls downfall. Is man responsible for the immoral dress's which are now being worn by the women? The slit skirt, the X ray gown, the decollette dress are each and all indications of the moral degeneration of women. This manner of dress is not respectable, it makes no difference who wears such clothes. Women in such garb makes disgraceful spectacles of themselves. It is a shame, it is a degradation. "Immodest dressing among girls today, the public dance hall and long auto rides to the country are agencies which are ruining our girls and creating a new breed of women who are not fit to be mothers and wives. Why do women and girls dress immodestly and disport themselves with recklessness? It is done to attract boys and men. "Would that girls only could know what power they have over their male acquaintances, and would exercise that power to the end that the young men would respect them and in turn respect themselves. The influence of a good girl over her young men friends is more powerful than any agency in the world." But man has his share of responsibility in these matters which he cannot escape. His share of responsibility is equal, but not greater than that of women. Young men should be clean in thought and action. They should respect womanhood, if womanhood respects itself. Young men should use their powers of good. Sins comes to us, we must pass good and evil everyday. Freedom of choice differentiates us as human beings for angels. There could be no heaven without freedom of choice. We are not mere machines we are moral agents. If we put ourselves where Christ cannot find us, we will be lost. "The average young man and young woman of today are under no restraint. Their parents are not doing their duty. They want to do as they please. The young people of today are like the parable of the prodigal son, they want what they think belongs to them before the time they are entitled to it. Ex


FINISH EACH TASK

On a page denoted to New Years resolutions in the January Woman's Home Companion an Alabama contributor tells, as follows, what the aim of his life to be in 1914:

"To keep the loose ends of my life tied up. If there is a garment unfinished on hand, finish it before undertaking anything else. If there is a letter owing, write it at once. If there is a bill due, pay it before incurring any other expense. Simple? Certainly, but keeping this one resolution means things actually done, not merely thought about and, moreover, shipshape affairs that permit freedom to take advantage of any change in fortune that may come."


PERSONALS

Miss Pauline Wilson is at home for the holidays

Miss Myra Nefflen is at home for the holidays

Miss Mary Moore is at home for the holidays

Miss Grace Bane has returned from Raleigh, NC

Miss Ethel Ritzell is spending the holidays at home

Miss Augurita Shores is at home for the holidays

Mr William Sollars is on a visit here to his family

Mr D R Baily of Cabin Run was in the city Tuesday

Mr and Mrs J R Kennedy are visiting in Pennsboro

Mr Ray Broome has returned from a visit to Morgantown

Miss Louise Messenger is visiting her brother at Fairmont

Mrs William Cather was in Cumberland on Saturday last

Mr and Mrs Frank Riley will spend Christmas in Baltimore

Mr Clifton Gurd is at home from Elk Garden for the holidays

Mr and Mrs George Sheetz are visiting in Trenton, NJ

Mr and Mrs Ward Hartman of Elkins, are visiting in the city

Mr J A Smith of Rees Mill was a caller at our office Tuesday

Misses Blanche and Louise Woolfe are at home for the holidays

Prof J C Sanders and family are at Morgantown for the holidays

Miss Irene Davis is visiting during the holiday in Morgantown

Mrs Charles Tibbetts is visiting her parents, Dr and Mrs Stehley

Dr Carter Long of Blaine, was here over Sunday with his parents

Mr and Mrs C N Finnell and family will spend Christmas at Parsons

Mrs S O Abell will visit her home near Romney during the holidays

Miss Mildred Wright is at home from Adamston for the holidays

Mr Seymour Whipp of Burlington made us a pleasant call on Monday

Mr Paul Douglass will spend Christmas with his parents at Cumberland

Mr and Mrs Henry Halbritter are visiting their daughter at Clarksburg

Mrs E F Hurst is entertaining her sister, of Irwin, Pa, for the holidays

Prof J B O Clemm will spend the holidays with Baltimore friends

Mrs Boyd Linthicum will spend Christmas in Baltimore with her sister.

Mr J W Stayman will spend the holidays with his mother at Cleveland, Ohio

Mr Andrew Woolf will spend his Christmas vacation with home folks here

Mrs F P Kelley and son of Fairmont, are the guests of her sister, Mrs B B Cavitt

Mr and Mrs Clyde Ranger and son of Cleveland, Ohio, are the guests of Mr and Mrs Henry Cole

Mrs D P Davis is visiting her mother at Pittsburg. Mr Davis spent Christmas with them

Mr Richard Lambdin and son of Thomasville, Ga, are visiting relatives here for the holidays

Misses Irene Davis, Katie Sims and Nancy Lauck are spending the holidays with friends in Morgantown

Mrs R G Richardson left Thursday of last week for an extended visiting to friends at Welmington, NC

Mr Jesse Sharpless and family of Gormania will spend the holidays with his mother, Mrs Carrie Sharpless

Mrs M J Filler and son, Calvin, left Saturday morning for Jacksonville, Fla. They will be gone about three months

Miss Myrtle White has returned from a visit to Baltimore, accompanied by her friend, Miss Nancy Smith, who will visit here during the holidays

Mr and Mrs H L Siever of New Bedford, Mass, are visiting relatives here. Mrs Siever was formerly Miss Wageley, and they are both well known here, and their many friends are glad to see them.

Mr H C Hodges is at home for the holidays

Mr John Stehley is at home to spend Christmas

Mr Stottle Steorts is at home for the holidays

Miss Lena Liller, of Douglas, visited Miss Katie Sims the first of the week

Mrs L H Hines of Rees Mill, was a pleasant caller at this office Tuesday

Mr and Mrs I P Carskadon of Headsville have been visiting Mrs Lena Hutson

Mr W W Coffroth of Elkins is spending Christmas with his father, A W Coffroth

Mrs Mellor of Argyle street is spending the holidays with her parents at Baltimore

Mr and Mrs F C Smoot of Hagerstown are visiting her mother, Mrs N J Crooks

Miss Marjorie Bashore of Thomas is the guest of Misses Helen and Maragret Johnson

Mrs Chas Gordon of Coalton stopped off here with her father in law, Mr H T Gordon, first of the week on her way home from Baltimore


COMMUNITY TREE

Dame nature was kind in holding off the sloppy snow until after the exercises at the tree on Wednesday night. The entire programme was carried out and it was indeed a gala day (or night) for both young and old of Keyser. The tree was beautiful from root to top, covered with countless colored lights and surmounted by a gigantic star. From the stands nothing could be seen but a sea of upturned faces, and all looking happy. The band furnished excellent music and the singers seemed to sing as they never before sang. The great center of interest among the children was old Santa himself, who liberally dispensed boxes of candy to all who applied. He seemed somewhat fatigued, but nevertheless very cheerful, but his duties there were not ended, for after the crowd had dispersed he silently and quietly visited the many homes in Keyser, thus showing that he has been reading the letters to him published in the various newspapers. The thanks of the community are due the committee on arrangements for the pleasure afforded them by this never to be forgotten Christmas of 1913.


DOUBLE AFFLICTION

The home of Mr C J Snyder on Spring street met with a double loss this week, in the death of both sister and mother. On Saturday last his sister, Mrs Tillie Grimes, aged 47 years, who has been ill for some time, passed away, and the mother, Mrs Elizabeth Snyder, aged 82 years, was called to her last rest on Sunday night. There are left to mourn their loss, the father, Mr Henry Snyder, and brothers, Simon D of Masontown and C J and S L of Keyser. Funeral services were conducted here by the Rev F H Havenner. Mrs Grimes was taken to Newburg for burial beside her husband, and Mrs Snyder was buried in the family burying ground at Masontown.


QUITE ILL

The Rev Henry Homan of near Ridgeville, is seriously ill. He is well known throughout this community and his many friends will regret hearing of his illness.


LIVING IN A CHICKEN COOP
New York

In a chicken coop, 6 feet wide and 20 feet long, five women and girls, four men and two children were rounded up last night at Pequanack, near Patterson. The children were taken to the S P C C Home in Patterson, while the women and men were locked up. The children were lying in a corner in filth knee deep. All the other inmates were held for the Grand Jury.


$260 REWARD!

Miss Sue Sheetz is engaged in "Youth's Companion" contest in which the Ten old subscribers securing most new subscriptions before Jan 1, 1914, each receive a salary of $5 per week for one year. She will be grateful for any new subscriptions to this most excellent weekly paper. $2 per year.


FOUR BABIES IN ONE YEAR
New Haven, Conn

Santa Claus was forehanded here in the home of Mrs January Hart this year, bringing a pair of twins on December 22. They are well and husky. Santa was late last year, not arriving with twins until January 19. Four babies in a family in one year is a record in this city.


MUST WE AGAIN?

Must we again call your attention to the unpaid subscription? The year is fast drawing to a close and we would like to begin 1914 with every subscriber paid up. We are mailing statements to those in arrears, and if you fail to respond we shall be obliged to discontinue the paper. Let this call bring a hearty response, for we know you want the paper.


TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH

Sunday School 9:45 am

Morning Worship 11:00 am

Subject, "The Christmas Afterglow"

C E 6:45 pm

Evening Worship 7:30 pm

Subject, "The Uncertainties and Certainties of The New Year."

Special anthems by the choir at these services.

Everybody is cordially invited to attend.

H F Baughman, Pastor


TO WILSON: HIS ONLY VICE
Washington

Vice President Marshal forwarded a Christmas present to President Wilson. It is a copy of Kin Hubbard's latest book entitled, "Back Country Folks" on the flyleaf Mr Marshal wrote this inscription:

" To the President of the United States. From his only vice-Thomas R Marshal."


SCHOOL REPORT

The following is a report of the Fountain school for the month beginning November 10, 1913 and ending December 5, 1913.

Number of pupils enrolled, boys, 16, girls, 16, total, 32

Average daily attendance, boys 14, girls, 15, total 29

Average daily absence, boys 90, girls 96, total 93

Those neither absent nor tardy, Leota Corbin, Bertha Corbin, Bertha Fleek, Bessie Fleek, Marguerite Tasker, Marguerite Steedman, Bessie Steedman, Armeda Parrill, Lola Parrill, Sadie Urice, Alma Staggs, Samuel Rogers, James Steedman, Frederick Staggs, Vause Staggs, and Wade Parrill.

Those present everyday except one, Hazle Urice, Lenora Rogers, Arthur Rogers, Edward Staggs and Hiley Fleek.


WORK THAT CURES

Just as workers in certain trades are more prone to certain diseases than workers in other trades, so there are some occupations which directly drive diseases away.

Consumption, for instance, is almost unknown among the workers in tanneries. Work in a tanyard is most unpleasant till one gets accustomed to the horrible smell, but the astringent properties of the tanbark are amazingly good for the chest and render the tanyard man practically proof not only against consumption, but the common cold.

Shepherds enjoy extraordinary good health. It is not simply a matter of open air, for farmers do not show a bill of health nearly as clean. Doctors have suggested that the reason lied in the fact that the strong odor of the sheep has an antiseptic influence and kills off stray germs.

Cases of influenza, too, are very rare indeed among gas worker employees, the smell that pervades gas works being an admirable antiseptic.

Typhoid is getting rarer in this country, but even when it was very common there has never been, a scientist recently stated, a known case of this terrible disease among copper miners.

If there is a rheumatism in your family, it would be a good idea to get your son a job in a turpentine factory.

Rheumatism is practically unknown in such factories and even cases of acute rheumatism have been known to recover completely on being transplanted to a turpentine atmosphere.


SAW THE SIGN

The Johnson's, according to a recent story, had an old hen who insisted upon neglecting her comfortable nest to lay a daily egg in the coal cellar. "I cant think" fretted Mrs Johnson, as she and her small son, Joe, together hunted for that particular egg, "why this one hen insists upon using the coal bin." "Why, that's easy, mother," exclaimed Joe in astonishment, "I s'pose she's seen the sign, 'Now is the time to lay in your coal."


BRAKEMAN BURNS
Charleston

When a Chesapeake and Ohio freight train ran into the rear of another freight train at Chelyan tonight, Blucher Morris, a brakeman, was pinioned beneath the wreckage. He burned to death in a fire caused by the upsetting of a stove in the caboose, before rescuers could reach him.


BIG INCREASE
Washington

There has been a tremendous increase recently in the number of young men offering themselves to the army recruiting officers for military service, last month there were 5,000 applications, 2,000 more than ever before recorded in time of peace. No longer is there any apprehension on the part of the army officers as to the possibility of obtaining all the recruits needed to fill the ranks to the authorized strength.


COMMUNITY TREE
CHILDREN'S DAY

The following program has been prepared by the Committee on Children's Day at the Community Christmas Tree, Saturday afternoon the 27th of December.

4:00 pm-School doors will open, the bell will ring and the children will march to their respective rooms in the school building.

4:30 pm-At the sound of the bell the children will march out of the school building and led by the band and will march down Mineral street to Piedmont street thence to Main, down Main to Armstrong, on Armstrong street to the tree.

5:00 pm-Selection by the band

Lord's Prayer by the children

Selection by the band

Illumination of the tree at the close of this number

"Joy to the World" children led by the band

"America" children

Selection band (optional)

"Santa Claus has Come to Town" by the children

"Hark the Herald Angels Sing" children led by band

"Silent Night" children led by band

At the close of the program the band will lead the procession up Mineral street to Piedmont street, where it will break ranks.

It is urgently requested that every member of the following committee be at the public school promptly at 3:45 pm Saturday.

Rev's M H Keen, F H Havenner, A O Price, R B Hammond, R E L Strider, W A O'Hara, the Superintendents of the Sunday schools; all the teachers of the public schools; Mesdames C S Hoffman, J H Markwood, J E Geldbaugh, W H Yeakley, Messrs, C M Miller, J H Shaffer, H G Fisher, Richard Thrush, Walter Secrist, N C Taylor.


A SCHOOL RECEPTION

On Saturday evening, Dec 20, Prof E J Welton, the popular young principal of the Bayard schools, gave a reception in honor of his pupils. The reception was held in the elegantly appointed parlors of the Junkins' Hotel. During the evening a number of instructive and interesting games were played which was very highly appreciated by all who participated in them. At ten o'clock refreshments, consisting of ice cream, oranges, apples, candy and nuts were served. After the refreshments had been served, the guests assembled in the "Music Room" where several popular and appropriate songs were very well rendered. Those present were: Lillian Spiker, Twila Kimble, Ogle Blocher, Bessie Maleney, Gladys Purgitt, Freda Parker, Elsie Armentrout, Anna Shell, Dessie Knotts, Hazel Veach, Mamie McGinnis, Vernon Rodrick, John Tamburini, Terrence Tamurini, Orin Fulk, Ernest Junkins, Herbert Mason, Frank Shell and Harley Hawk. Many beautiful and useful Christmas presents were presented to Mr Welton by the pupils. The ceremony departed for their home at a late hour after expressing their delight at the evening spent so pleasantly, wishing each other a merry Christmas and a happy New Year.-A Guest


TO PREVENT SPREAD
Washington DC

To prevent the spread of trichinosis, a dread disease, little known to the department of agriculture, tonight issued a warning against the consumption of raw and uncooked pork products, the declared source of the malady. In many districts of the country, particularly in sections with large foreign populations, the statement said, large quantities of pork are consumed during the Christmas season, resulting frequently in cases of seriously impaired health, if not in fatalities. The department asserts that during November and December, 1911, there were 58 cases of trichinosis that terminated fatality in one California community. In each instance the disease was traced to sausage, eaten in an uncooked condition. Other outbreaks of the disease with many fatalities are cited. The disease is caused by a parasite or worm, microscope in size, found in hog flesh and there is no known effective method of treatment. Statistics based upon inspection by government scientists during a period of nine years show that 1.41% of the eight million hogs examined were infected with trichinosis.


PRESIDENT WILL REST

President Wilson intends that his vacation at Pass Christian, Miss, shall be complete rest from official activity but in leisure moments he will apply himself to the task of choosing tentatively members of the federal reserve board to be created by the new currency law. The president will see no visitors, will engage in no voluminous correspondence and will isolate himself for three weeks of recreation and quiet thinking. He realizes that in the selection of the federal reserve board he will be confronted with one of the most important problems of his administration and that the success or failure of the new currency law will depend to some extent on the quality of the officials of the board who will administer it. Mr Wilson thus far has fixed on no individuals. He has a tentative list under consideration and is adding to it daily. Members of Congress, especially Democratic Senators are not recommending anyone as they have announced they wish to leave the president free from any political pressure. The president is desirous of getting the biggest men possible versed alike in the details of business and finance. James J Hill, former head of the Northern Pacific, is known to be one of those most prominent in the president's mind. The president is hoping to leave here Tuesday.


ROYAL BAKING POWDER ABSOLUTELY PURE
Cakes, hot biscuit, hot breads, and
Other pastry, are daily necessities
In the American family. Royal Baking
Powder will make them more digestible,
Wholesome, appetizing.
No alum-no lime phosphates

A P BROWN & BRO
KEYSER, W VA

 

At the big night and day street clock where you can really get the Lowest Prices On Your Christmas Jewelry
Jewelry, Silverware, and Silver Novelties
Diamonds from $10 up
Engraving Free
T H DAVIS
The Old Reliable Jeweler
Main St-Keyser, W Va

 

KEYSER TRIBUNE
$1.00 A YEAR

 

CARSKADON'S
Have for Christmas trade the most substantial of Gifts, suitable for everybody, namely, everything in Fine Glassware from 5 c up to $1.00. Also Raisins, figs, currants, citron, orange and lemon peel, mince meat and all those things which go to make the Christmas table attractive and beautiful. Do not fool your money away on useless toys, but come and supply yourselves with something worth 100 cents on the dollar. Come and see what we have to offer you.

 
MAIN OFFICE AND WAREROOMS OF
W A LILLER
KEYSER, W VA
SEND HIM YOUR ORDERS FOR BUILDING MATERIALS.

 
LET US SUPPLY YOUR DRUG WANTS
AND YOU WILL BE SATISFIED!
ARZA FURBEE
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST
118 N MAIN STREET

 
WHEN YOU BUY YOUR SHOES
You want the best value you
Can get for your money, don't you?
Most folks come here for that.
PEOPLE EXPECT MORE
OF US THAN THEY DO
OF OTHERS
They know we can give more and they
Know we have been in the habit of
Doing it ever since we started in business.
C R WEIMER
MAIN STREET
We give S and H Green Trading Stamps

 
KILL THE COUGH AND CURE THE LUNGS
WITH DR KINGS NEW DISCOVERY
FOR COUGHS AND COLDS
AND ALL THROAT AND LUNG TROUBLES
PRICE 50C AND $1
TRIAL BOTTLE FREE
GUARANTEED SATISFACTORY
OR MONEY REFUNDED

 
BALTIMORE SUN
(MORNING, EVENING & SUNDAY)
MORNING OR EVENING BY MAIL
25C A MONTH, $3 A YEAR
THE SUNDAY SUN
BY MAIL
1 MONTH, 15C
2 MONTHS, 25C
$1.50 A YEAR
ALL THREE EDITIONS BY MAIL, $7.50 A YEAR
ADDRESS YOUR ORDER TO:
THE A S ABELL COMPANY
BALTIMORE MD

 
KEYSER PHARMACY
KEYSER W VA

 
At the big night and day street clock where you can really get the
LOWEST PRICES ON YOUR CHRISTMAS JEWELRY
EVERYTHING IN
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE AND SILVER NOVELTIES
Diamonds from $10 up
Engraving Free
T H DAVIS
The Old Reliable Jeweler
Main St, Keyser W Va

 
FOR SALE
Farm, two miles from Keyser. U G Workman, Keyser W Va

 
PONIES
A good Christmas present is a nice Shetland pony. Dr F L Baker of Burlington has 46 of them.

 
VIAVI TREATMENT
I will be at the Reynolds Hotel the second and last Wednesday of every month, from one until three o'clock pm. Mrs L M Kenniston, Manager

 
Miss Ida Crawford, Agent, SPIRELLA CORSET, as advertised in The Ladies Home Journal, Delineator, etc. 27 W Piedmont St, Phone 164-F

 
THINGS TO EAT
GROCERIES
ALL FIRST CLASS AND FRESH
CANDIES OF ALL KINDS
NUTS AND ORANGES
HOME MADE KRAUT
CIGARS AND TOBACCO
28 ARMSTRONG ST

 
DR C W LEPS
DENTIST
WEST BUILDING-BELL PHONE 234

 

SCHOOL BOOKS
Bought new for this term, 6th grade of school, used but about two weeks. Good as new. Will be sold at reduction. To any student entering this grade this will be a bargain.
Elson Literature, Book One
Modern English, Book Two
New World Speller
Hygiene and Sanitation
Complete Arithmetic
Mace's Primary History
Frye's First Geography
Apply at this office

 
D L TRENTON
CITY'S BEST MEAT MARKET
106 MAIN STREET
KEYSER W VA
FRESH AND CURED MEATS
WE SELL HEINTZ'S FAMOUS GOODS
GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS
PROMPT DELIVERY ANYWHERE IN TOWN
GIVE HIM A TRIAL.


 
FOOTERS DYE WORKS
CUMBERLAND MD
"Always Safest and Best"
A W COFFROTH, AGENT

Safeguard and preserve your furs, blankets, comforts, heavy hangings, portiers, carpets rugs, winter wraps and clothing by having them thoroughly cleaned by our special process before storing for summer.

 
BRIGHT'S COAL YARD
A pleasure to use our Run of Mine and Lump. That Coal that gives more heat for the same money. We pay for weighing and you don't have the railroad to cross.

 
CHILDREN CRY
FOR FLETCHER'S
CASTORIA

 
KRETOL
The perfect germicide, antiseptic,
Disinfectant and parasite destroyer
Valuable for the farmer, horseman,
Cattle, stock and poultry raiser.
Disinfects stables and all other places
Where disinfectants should be used
Kills fleas, lice and ticks.
One quart makes 24 gallons.
Try it and learn its value

 
J M LINTHICUM
KEYSER, W VA


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