MINERAL DAILY NEWS

KEYSER W VA

SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1913


HARDY COUNTY

  The time of the year is here when every precaution should be taken to prevent forest fires. The valuable timber in this section of W Va is disappearing all too rapidly and there is none to spare to the ravage of fire. The State forest fire law should be enforced to the letter.

  A large number of copper snakes have been reported killed in the drift piles along the river. The are supposed to washed out of the mountain during the late flood. Thirteen snakes were killed in one drift near Karl McNeill's recently.

  Miss Molelle Kuykendall who has been teaching school the past winter left Tuesday morning for her home in Martinsburg.

  Mrs Blanche Taylor is very ill at her home near Pern. Her son Frank Taylor of Cumberland has been called to her bedside. Mrs Taylor is over 80 years of age.

  We have had some real summer weather the past week the thermometer climbing to 85 in the shade. Don't rake them off yet, however.

  Mr and Mrs J Marshall Dorsey spent a day in Romney this week. We regret to learn that Mr and Mrs Dorsey will move to Romney next week to reside.

  MARRIED, at the Manse by the Rev C D Wilkeson Tuesday, April 29, 1913, Thomas Ashby See and Miss Sadie V Clever daughter of Jno W and Josephine Clever of the Durgon neighborhood.

  Geo T Leatherman sent us last week a kangaroo mouse which is quite a curiosity in this section. The mouse has short front legs and its hind legs are much larger. The tail is much longer than that of an ordinary mouse.

  P S Welton has been quite sick at his home near town for several days but we are glad to say is now improving.

  Will Clover and Harry Dolan are confined to their home with the mumps. Charley Whetzel is also right sick with them. Moorefield Examiner


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

  The Western Union Telegraph Company has moved its office from the B&O station to the room next to the telephone exchange. This will be a great convenience to the public. Mrs Dean of Pittsburgh is operator.

  Miss Jane J Baird a trained nurse, daughter of A Baird of this place, was married in Philadelphia last Wednesday to Dr J C Charles.


GRANT COUNTY

  E M Johnson returned Tuesday from a visit to Hampshire county. He drove his new car.

  Sheridan Ours and family Mrs Ours' sister of Davis are here visiting their parents Mr and Mrs Freeland Cosner.

  Dr. Vanmeter has purchased of Ervin Kessel a Ford runabout of latest model. The Doctor will use the car in the work of his profession.

  Rev Thomas, the new M E minister, preached his first sermon here Sunday to an appreciative congregation all of whom were favorably impressed.

  J W Idleman and son of Mt Storm were here over Monday night. Mr Idleman was on his way home from Circleville where he had been looking over the field for ministerial work.

  Dolly Bros of Onego this we purchased a pure bred black stallion of the Shenendoah Valley Importing Co, of Winchester Va, Milton Dolly was here Wednesday on his way to Moorefield after the horse.

  G P Miller, of Romney and Dr Baker of Burlington were here Saturday looking after telephone business. These gentlemen are taking quite an interest in the company and are making many improvements in the line thus insuring a much improved service.

  The C & P central office was moved this week to a room over W A Ervin's store. A booth for the general public has been installed in M E Rader's store. The moving of the board was in charge of John Clark who has had men here for some time putting in poles and transferring lines in order to give the public the best of service possible. Petersburg Press.


ROOFING AND SPOUTING
ALL KINDS OF TIN AND SHEET IRON FOR ROOFS
COPPER GUTTERS AND SPOUTING
SNOW GUARDS AND CUT-OFFS
REPAIR WORK AND ROOF PAINTINGS A SPECIALTY
THE PEOPLES TIN SHOP
A M KESNER, PROP.
27 CENTER ST. KEYSER PHONE 61-F


HOME MADE CAKES

MIXED CAKES, DOZ-------------10C

LAYER CAKES, EACH-------------10C

LEMON SQUARES, EACH------------10C

RIBBON CAKES, EACH----------------10C

DEVIL FOOD CAKES, EACH------------10C

JELLY ROLL, EACH-----------------------10C

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT PIES 10C EACH

L. WIPPEL
92 MINERAL ST. PHONE 186 KEYSER

SEMI-TROPICAL FRUITS

STRAWBERRIES&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;..18C BOX

PINEAPPLE&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;.15C EACH

HOME GROWN ONIONS&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;3 FOR 10C

LETTUCE&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;&ldots;..22C

BANANAS TEXAS ONIONS

PHONE 73 KEYSER

R. W. 9.


FANCY GROCERIES

"THE FRANCIS H LEGGIT LINE"

A FULL STOCK CARRIED ALSO OTHER HIGHEST GRADE GOODS

HOME DRESSED MEATS, POULTRY

FISH AND CHOICE APPLES

ALL KINDS OF GREEN GOODS

HARRISON MEAT MARKET COMPANY


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PRINTING TO THE DAILY NEWS


RECEPTION TO KEYSER SCHOOL

PATRONS IN NEW DEPARTMENTS

  In answer to an invitation from the Keyser schools, through J C Sanders, Superintendent, last night several hundred of the patrons assembled in the grade building to investigate the recently added departments of Domestic Art and Domestic Science and Manual Training. The first two departments are directed by Miss Linda Sabin, of Lorraine, Ohio, who has had a good theoretical schooling and extensive practical training. In the Domestic Art Department, this course covers two years of training for the sixth and seventh grades with which it is compulsory and three years as an elective branch in the High School. The work now is very plain sewing as the department has only been open about two months. However, in the courses there is ample opportunity to become very competent garment makers.

  The Domestic Science Department has to do with cooking particularly. In this department is a large range, several hot plats and other necessary kitchen equipment. Here the eighth and High School pupils are eligible. This is also a course of two or more years. Up to this time just simple cooking have been demonstrated, but in due season fancy menus will be prepared, an not only in the character of the cooking considered, but more than this the requirement of getting certain results within a given cost.

  Miss Sabin is planning to give some public demonstrations of the work of her departments this spring so that the whole people may see and know what is being done and its purposes. Next year Household Chemistry, an especially important thing, will be introduced in the Domestic Science work about the first of January, when Miss Sabin believes she will have pupils quite ready for the advanced work. In both departments the girls are deeply interested and engage enthusiastically in their work.

  Another very important new department that of Manual Training, directed by Principal Dunkle, gives the boys of the seventh and eighth grades and High School something out of the ordinary, routine work to do. This department is equipped for light carpentry, and Mr Dunkle has a number of youths who are working hard along the mechanical lines. They seem delighted that they mat have good tools and be allowed to work in shaping wood so it may be of special use to man. The course in this is suppose to carry a boy along so far that he may be able to do not only a well finished piece of woodwork, but be able to plan and construct buildings. Apart from the trade some of this work is good mathematical training.

  The time spent in those departments, rather than being wasted, as some patrons have suggested , ???in recreation period as most of all pupils must have a portion of the day's school hours when they have some radical departure from the routine work or have recess.

  Strawberry punch was served with graham crackers. The several large bowls of this delicious drink were presided over by Misses:

Stella Barrett, Frances Hoover, Elizabeth Grover, Mary Moore, Helen Powell, Julia Wright, May Paris, Mabel Selfress, Bertha Glaze, Elsie Kesner, Alma Peters, Ruth Hollen, Bernadetter Scribner.

  The new departments are situated in large basement rooms, built of concrete, under the old school building. They are well supplied with artificial lights and are clean and nice. The equipment is as yet meager, but one of the trustees advises that now they have had a chance to learn of the real needs, for the next winter that equipment will be had for all ordinary needs.

  In these new departments during session, school patrons and visitors are welcome at any time, and it will be a good thing certainly for the parents to visit the school that they may know just what is actually being done.

  The Keyser Public Schools occupy two large buildings, and the course of study makes the school rank with others of its class. There are eight grades and the high school. Twenty four teachers are employed. J C Sanders is superintendent and John Dunkle principal. The enrollment runs near a thousand.


BANK OPENING

  The First National Bank is holding an opening today in the fine remodeled banking rooms. Invitations were sent out announcing the opening this afternoon and hundreds of people have already been in to view the place as we go to press.


BIG SHOOT

  J Carson Carson of Martinsburg spent last night in Keyser. He was enroute to Lonaconing where on Monday he will contest at shooting live pigeons with Oscar Hohing at the Maryland Athletic Park for $50 a side.

  Fifteen live birds each will be used as targets, with a 25 yard rise and a 50 yard boundary.


WOMAN PARALYZED

  Yesterday Mrs Sevilla Renshaw, an old lady of Piedmont, was paralyzed, as she is now in rather critical condition.


BOY SCOUTS ON A HIKE TO 21ST;
COOK ON STONES

  Yesterday evening under command of Scout Master D W Weaver, the Keyser Boy Scouts took a hike to 21st bridge.

  Each boy had a portion of grub, which he cooked in pioneer day style on the rocks, and with his appetite whetted to a razor edge by his walk, ate and enjoyed immensely.

  This movement here is rapidly becoming popular and Mr Weaver, who is naturally a philanthropist, will soon have a goodly number of boys who he will bring close together in good fellowship.

  The results of this movement are far reaching, and much permanent good in this community to our youth is sure to come of it.


THE NEW CHARTER EXPLAINED;

LETTER BY PROMINENT CITIZEN

  Keyser W Va, April 28, 1913.

Citizens of Keyser and South Keyser:

  On Tuesday, May 6, 1913, you will be called upon to vote for or against uniting all of the citizens of your towns, under a Bill of Rights granted to you by the Legislature of W Va, and known as the charter Incorporating the City of Keyser.

  The demand for this Bill of Rights and Home Rule grown out of many circumstances known to you all, among others:

1. Keyser has no Charter and is now governed by a general act of the Legislature adapted to towns of less than 2000 population, passed by the Legislature of Virginia in 1845. This thriving and populous community has outgrown this law and under its limitations, it is impossible to make that progress or to take that place among the cities of the State, to which we are entitled, by reason of our natural resources, peculiar advantages and growing population.

2. The separation by an invisible line of the community into two towns under separate governments, is unwise, expensive, unnecessary and wholly undesirable. The social, moral, sanitary and business interests of the people in both towns are exactly the same.

3. One mayor and council can more effectively serve all the people, than two mayors and two councils can do under the present separation. Union will make for efficiency, economy, and better protection for all, and Greater Keyser will more widely advertise and improve what is now known as one of the prettiest, cleanest and brightest towns in the State, and will do more than anything else to build and strengthen the business and social ties that should exist in the community.

4. The New Charter will not only increase the size of the town, but will bring in for assessment purposes other property valued at $400,000 so we may receive at the present rate and without raising individual taxes, the sum of $2,000.00 additional revenue. Should this additional sum not be needed, the present tax rate can be lowered.

5. The water system of Keyser is, and for a long number of years has been self sustaining, and in recent years has shown a handsome profit or surplus above cost of maintenance. Interest on bonds and amounts necessary to pay off bonds as they become due. No taxes are levied for water bonds, except the last bonds issued for the dam, 5c on one hundred dollars.

The citizens on the hill and South Keyser are without sufficient supply of water for domestic purposes, and the whole town is without adequate fire protection. There is an abundance of watre in the resevoir; more than ample supply to every need of all the citizens and for full and complete fire protection. We have the demand. We have the supply, but are without the means to deliver.

  Under the present law, no relief can ever be afforded. As a business proposition, it is not wise to place ourselves, by the adoption of the Charter, where we can obtain relief if three fifths of the voters desire it?

  It is contended by many and there is much truth in the contention, that a large amount of water is wasted. Stop the leaks, conserve the water and put water system on business basis. This the council is now trying to do it with all the means it has at its disposal. Under the New Charter, the people injured can speak in no uncertain tones and effect the necessary remedy.

6. Numerous other reasons for a modern law for our town government will suggest themselves to the thoughtful citizen. It is impossible to name them all here.

  The proposed charter was prepared by the undersigned committee, after careful investigation and study contains nothing that is radical, revolutionary or untried.

  It confers direct home rule upon the individual citizen by giving him a vote upon the selection of candidates, election of officers, and upon every ordinance or measure, and provides for simple safe economical, sane business administration of the city affairs.

  The objection so far argued has come from misconception or misunderstanding of the true meaning of the provisions of the Charter.

  It will not create a one man government, or invest unusual power on the mayor. Under the present law the mayor may have two votes. When his votes create a tie, he can vote again to break the tie. Under the new Charter he has no vote in the council, but after mature consideration he may veto a measure who he may regard as unwise. This veto can only be destroyed by an affirmative consent of three out of four to adopt any ordinance measure or confirm any appointment. After all this careful passing of the measure or selection of subording officers, the final veto of bad laws discharge of unfaithful servants is posed in the people.

  It does not impose a two dollar tax upon the citizen or authorize poll, capitation or head tax.

  It does not forbid the raising of chickens within the corporate limit.

  It does not provide for or authorize the paving of the streets, gutters, crosswalks at the expense of the individual property owner. Such work must and can only be paid out for out of the general treasury. Sidewalks and curbs are the only street improvements for which the individual property owners can be charged. (See section 23) Section 16 authorizes the council to order street gutters and crosswalks to be paved but when such work is done, it must be paid for out of the treasury. It can not be collected from the property owner.

  No bonds can be issued or debt incurred unless all questions connected with the same shall have been first submitted to a vote of the people and have received three fifths of all the votes cast for and against the same. The provision of the Constitution of the State and of the Charter of the City of Keyser are indentical upon the subject.

  Moreover, when it comes to a question of this sort, the council ? increased from four to eleven by adding thereto the citizens committee of seven persons owning at least $100 worth of property each. (See section ? of the Charter.) This maker a court representing at least nine thousand dollars worth of property, who ??act upon all questions on going ??or expending money under a proposed bond issue. This is not so under the present law and there is no old Charter that has been proposed or adopted in W Va that successfully guards the interest of the taxpayer in the expenditure of money in raising taxes.

  Speaking in this connection and the Charter as a whole, Governor Glasscock told a representative of the Committee when he signed the Charter of the City of Keyser, that it wasn't the best Charter he had ever signed.

  The adoption of the Charter will not increase taxation. On the contrary dispensing with the Mayor and council of South Keyser and reducing the council of Keyser to four numbers, will prove more economical. It is contemplated to pay the mayor and three councilmen the same salary that the mayor, recorder and five councilmen of the town of Keyser now receive. It is proposed that the city clerk shall do all the clerical work now done by the recorder, and shall collect the taxes now collected by the Town Sergeant, for the same salary that the Town Sergeant now receives in commissions.

  No thoughtful man who has read and considered Section 30 of the Charter from a business standpoint will fail to appreciate the wisdom and economy of its provisions.

  There may be those that think that the city clerk should be elected and not appointed. But when it is remembered that practically all of the work that the city clerk will be called upon to perform for the next two years at least, will be the collection of taxes, which is now done by the town sergeant, an appointive officer, it will be seen that to make the city clerk an elective officer at this time would be unwise and unbusinesslike. We used to elect our tax collector or town sergeants , and the records of our courts were full of suits on sergeants bounds for failure to collect taxes and to settle with the council. So unbusiness like was this policy, an so odious did it become, that the Legislature amended Chapter 47 of the Code and required these officers to be appointed by the council. So far as the clerical work of the office is concerned for the next year or two at least. It will amount to nothing more than recording the minutes of the two monthly meetings of the council, and making a copy of the county assessor's book.

  As Police Judge, the work of the office, based upon the records of the of the Mayor's court for the last four years will require practically none of the city's clerks time. All fees and commissions are paid into the treasury, thus abolishing the iniquitous fee and commission system (good business requires that a man in the prosecution of criminals and collecting taxes should be paid for what his services are worth to the city and that he should not have the office for whatsoever he can make out of it.)

  When the time comes, or should experience teach us that it would be necessary and better to divide the duties of the office of the city clerk, it will be the simplest matter to have section 30 of the Charter amended and changed to meet the lessons of experience and the desires of the people. This is true also with regard to any of the working details and provisions of the Charter. It is far easier to work out these details and correct any fault that practical experience show than it is to get a Charter that is perfect in all its workings at first, or one that will meet the absolute approval of everybody.

  The committee recognizes that it would be impossible to draft a bill which the Legislature would pass, or the Constitution of the State permit that would meet the entire approval of all the people in every detail.

  The end sought was to provide a method by which the 6,000 or more people of this community could come together, and administer their own affairs in a safe, businesslike and economical manner. This we unhesitatingly say can be done under the provisions of the proposed Charter. The plan is not new. It's genuine value has been proven in more than 275 cities scattered throughout the 38 states of the Union and is vouched for as tax saver and ideal form of government by more than 12,000,000 of the people living under it. It is a significant fact, that no city having once adopted it has ever returned to the old form of government. It is endorsed by Theodore Roosevelt, Charles E Hughes, former Governor of New York and now a member of the Supreme court of Appeals of the US, Woodrow Wilson, William Jennings Bryan, the eminent Socialist leader, Carl D Thompson, Judge B T Lindsey, author of the juvenile court and Judge of the childrens court of Denver, Frances J Heney, the graft prosecutor of San Francisco, John Mitchell, A P McArdie and Samuel Gompers. It is modeled after the Charter of Parkersburg W Va, which follows closely the Des Moines plan. We publish here with a letter from Mr E M Gilkeson of Parkersburg. Mr Gilkeson was born and raised in Hardy county. He is a brother of Hon H B Gilkeson of Romney, and J W Gilkeson of Moorefield, was collector of Internal Revenue under Grover Cleveland, and is a citizen of high repute and splendid standing in the state and recognized authority upon the subject of municipal affairs.

( continued on page 4)

NO PAGE 4


PERSONALS

  Mrs James Rogers and children are at Harrison for a visit to her parents.

  Mrs Laura Davis is spending a while with Mr and Mrs Willis Davis at the farm.

  Miss Edna McIntyre is visiting her mother for a few days at Piedmont.

  Louie Beaty has returned to Williamson, after spending a few days here with his wife.

  Mrs Purgitt was a Cumberland visitor yesterday.

  Select the present for your girlfriend who is to graduate as a trained nurse, from Romig's well assorted stock of rubber goods-hot water bottles, irrigators, etc. Ask for Miss Korb.

  The Epworth League of the Grace M E Church, South, topic for Sunday, June 11th, will be Jesus' Doctine of his Own Person. Miss Ada Wagoner will lead the services.

  We're showing the prettiest line of summer dress goods ever brought to Keyser in voiles, all colors; silks, all shades, and may other kinds. Also assorted trimmings. D Long and Son's.

  For summer goods of all kinds you will find nothing this side of New York to equal the stock. I M Long is selling.

  The Ladies Mite Society of the Presbyterian church will serve ice cream, coffee and cake, in the building recently vacated by the First National Bank, corner Main and Center streets. , Saturday evening from 7 to 10 o'clock.

  If you want a cook advertise in the New's "Want Column"

  Ladreth's Garden Seeds-Irish Cobbler, Burnbank, Hebron and Early Rose seed potatoes, at McDonald's.


RAN THROUGH PLATE GLASS

  Elkins, May 9th

  Hurrying into a ten cent store today to buy a pair of green goggles to protect his eyes, J A Duncan, a railroad mail clerk, dashed for his train. The glasses effected Duncan's eyesight and he ran through a plate glass front, receiving a badly cut hand, creating a panic among the crowd of shoppers and doing property damages estimated at $100.


PLUMBING

  For gas, water and heat done by expert mechanics. Write or phone for terms and plans. C C Arbogast Keyser W Va.


I M Long is giving 20 percent off on lace curtains for ten days only. Buy quick while you have a large line to select from.


EXECUTORS SALE

  The undersigned executor will on Thursday, May 15th 1913, at one o'clock sharp, at the late residence of George W Staggs Sr, the home of James Tasker in Cabin Run district of Mineral county , sell at public auction the personal property of the late George W Staggs Sr, consisting of household and kitchen furniture, farming utensils, lumber, wagons, blacksmith tools and other articles too numerous to mention.

  The sale will begin promptly at one o'clock.

  Terms of Sale: On all amounts under $10.00 cash; on amounts over $10.00 credit over ninety days will be given, the purchaser to give his note with approved personal security, bearing interest of date. No property to be removed until the terms of the sale are compiled with.

Frank C Reynolds
Executor of Goerge W Staggs, Sr, deceased
S N Moore, Auctioneer


LUMBER IS UP AND PRICES

STILL GOING HIGHER. BETTER

GET IN YOUR ORDERS NOW.

LILLER'S LUMBER PARLORS

KEYSER, W VA


TRANSCRIBED JULY 2, 2002 BY CANDY SHILLINGBURG


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