MINERAL DAILY NEWS
KEYSER W VA
TUESDAY MAY 6, 1913


B&O TRAIN NO. 2 DERAILED;
NARROW ESCAPE FOR PASSENGERS

  Baltimore & Ohio passenger train No 2 east bound due here at 7:30 o'clock, but running late about 40 minutes was derailed by a broken rail just east of Oakland this morning and passengers and the train crews alike had a narrow escape.

  All the cars left the rails and bumped along on the ties for about 200 yards before they could be brought to a stand still. The passengers in the day coaches and sleepers were shaken up but not seriously injured. Pageman Riffle of Parkersburg suffered slight injuries.

  The train, with conductor Frederick, was drawn by the two engines, in front No 2152 Engineer Jas. Carniff and second No 2157 Engineer Dan Pugh. Neither engine left the rails, and the baggage and mail cars which were held by the coupling, each had but one truck off. The other cars took the flat land side of the track and did not overturn. On the opposite side there was a drop of some ten feet.

  A special made up at Grafton passed by on the third track and brought the passengers on east. The tool cars from Cumberland, Keyser and Rowlesburg were rushed to the scene.

  The accident is attributed to a broken rail. The fact that the engineers were adhering strictly to the speed limit and not, running over 30 miles an hour, prevented a horrible catastrophe.

  Rev. Beane, colored of Keyser, was a passenger. He says he was fast asleep in his seat when the jar suddenly awakened him. The women passengers were greatly frightened, he says, but made no loud outery.


GOOD WORK IS BEING DONE BY CITY OFFICIALS

  The Town Council, as a body, and the individuals members of this body who are at the head of special departments, are deserving a much praise as to their conduct in handling many trying propositions. For instance, all sanitary work is done at night. The streets are cleaned at night in the main, and the garbage wagons are also operated at night, except for emergency work.

  Street Commissioner, A J Keenan, had a prime part in several of these schemes which are working so successful and to the satisfaction of nearly everyone. As we said last week, without a garbage plant, or some means of destroying the city's malodorous, pestilence- breeding wastes, the problem is a serious one to solve. However, as a rule to the streets are clean and a majority of the premises neat.


DEATH OF LITTLE GIRL

  The six month old daughter of Mr and Mrs B H Hartman, NO 489 St. Cloud St, died late yesterday. The burial will take place tomorrow afternoon at Purgittsville, Pine Church Cemetery.


RESPONSIBLE FOR BROKEN ARM
  Kingwood W Va

  W Foster has engaged counsel to bring suit against the B&O railroad for injury sustained while riding on a passenger train in the vicinity of Rockwood. He was in the smoker. In the rack above the seat in which he was sitting was deposited, a suit case full of tools used by a stone mason, placed there by one of a party of Italians riding in the car. A sharp turn and jerk threw the suit case out and down on Foster's left arm., which was lying on the metal arm of the seat. It struck him also on the side of the head, raising a knot. His hand was hurt and his arm broken in three places. The railroad company is making efforts to compromise the case.


FRUIT CROP PROSPECTS BETTER THAN AT FIRST REPORTED

  Now that April showers have moistened the earth and Ravonian breath of spring has blown on the tender fruit, much of it is reported frozen beyond question, has shown signs of new life and is growing rapidly.

  This more hopeful condition has revived the spirits of many who depended entirely on their little commercial orchards for their cash income. In many places, particularly in the mountains, according to well authenticated reports, in many orchards there are enough peaches left for an average crop.

  Other stone fruits have fared better than earlier reports indicated, and in most of the commercial orchards the apple crop will be good.

  The outcome of the late freeze which was first pronounced, all destructive, is of course pleasing.

  It brings back to mind an oft repeated expression we used to hear when we were a boy among the old people of the rural districts: " This is a fruit year, and there will be fruit regardless of the weather." Some times in this particular case, that claim is borne out of the actual conditions. The amateurs and professionals were all alike fooled in their fruit crop predictions, but are all equally thankful that they were mistaken.

  From present indications, throughout this county there will be over a half a crop of peaches, of the most desirable varieties, with some cherries and plums.

  Of the seed fruits in most all the orchards, except in very low lands, apples will be good crop, with some pears and quinces.

  The berry crop was severely hit and the small fruit industry is getting to be of some importance in this county.


PIG ROAST AT BACHELORS CLUB

  Last night, Donald P Davis, one of the most active members of the Bachelors Club, who it is understood will join the benedicts date in this month, in keeping with an unwritten law of that club under the circumstances gave to his fellows, a pig roast, with all that goes therewith to make the luncheon delightful.

  Miss Elizabeth Hoffman, sister of one of the members of the club, prepared the menu and superintended the roasting which was up to the Queen's taste.

  Though this club has been in existence for some time, Mr Davis will be the first one to renounce bachelorhood.

  H H Hoffman, was toastmaster.

  The members present were:
  Allen Patchett
  Bob Ric
  R A Mulledy
  Jack Rizer
  D P Davis
  Marion Workman
  John Carskadon
  George A Carskadon
  "Susie" Neville
  Jacko Douglass
  Walter Evans
  J Harrison Isles
  Clyde Hott
  H H Hoffman


B & O SHOPNOTES

  Mike Cullen, helper for Dusty Avers, was off duty latter part of last week.

  A Fertig has returned to work after being off duty several days.

  One of our men went out hunting the other day and caught an old possum and 11 young ones. He also caught 3 fox squirrels in the tree adjoining.

  A number of our men are riding bicycles to and from work where they live some distance from the shop. One man lives 3 miles out in the country and uses his bike every day both winter and summer.

  Blacksmith Stickley put a tire on the mill wheelbarrow Monday morning and certainly did talk some while the work was going on.


A MYSTERY

  A small steam engine has been placed in the car shops and is being set up by mechanics in the lumber shed. Without the steam pipe being connected Saturday the engine started to run and stopped of its own accord when the twelve o'clock whistle blew. At one o'clock, the engine started again and stopped at six. It certainly is an evident fact that the engine has had good training before coming to our shop and everybody is anxiously waiting for what she will do when the steam pipe is connected ( To be continued)


BOUGHT FRUIT FARM

  John Ritchie, of Macksville, and Atty. Charles Ritchie, of Keyser, have purchased the property known as the Davis Fruit Farms, near Keyser, on the western slopes of the Knobley Mountains.

  This is a very desirable place of 188 acres, with a good home and outbuilding. It has on it 100 bearing apple trees, and 400 young apples and 1200 young peach trees. The Ritchie Brothers will continue to plant fruit trees, and John Ritchie will move on the farm.


PERSONALS

Mrs Ira Parker, who has been visiting her parents at the Tannery, returned home Saturday.

W W Davis, DD, Secretary of the Lord's Day Alliance of Maryland, was in Keyser yesterday. Rev Davis some years ago was pastor of the M E church at Piedmont.

Captain Norris Bruce spent Saturday and Sunday at Reeses Mill. Mr Bruce took part in the closing exercises of the Reeses Mill school.

Mrs Rady Harmon of Baltimore arrived here this evening on a visit to Mrs Geo Harmon.

E F Murphy, who at one time conducted the B&O Restaurant, arrived here today from Baltimore.

Mr C G Scribner was called to Pittsburgh Monday, on account of the death of his aunt, Mrs Sarah Woodcock.

Miss May Golden left today for home at Johnstown, Pa.

Ben Grayson was taken to the Cumberland hospital to be operated on for appendicitis.

Misses Nita Shafer and Anna Kolkhorst were in Cumberland yesterday.

Mr and Mrs Art Tutwilder, of Beaver Run, are in town making arrangements to move to our midst.


MR. HETZEL SEVERELY INJURED

  John J Hetzel, of Martinsburg, met with a serious but not dangerous accident about 18 miles from Berkeley Springs, near Unger's store. Mr Hetzel and E O Lieghley were looking over the telephone wires of the line in which the former is interested when one of the colts in the team which Mr Hetzel was driving fell down, the other took fright and started to run. They were driven in to the ?, a wheel broke and Mr Hetzel was thrown violently to the ground. He was picked up and driven hastily to Berkeley Springs, where he is confined to his bed and attended by Dr. Grubb. The latter said there were no bones broken but Mr Hetzel was pretty badly shaken and would be sore for several days.


A NICE LITTLE PET

  The whale lives about 400 years. A whale would be a good thing for a person to buy who hated to part with a pet after he had once become attached to it.

THE MOON

  Because of the lunar surface gravity on the moon, a body which weighs twenty punds here would weigh only three pounds there.

"CATGUT" STRINGS.

  "Catgut Strings" are made of the intestines of sheep. The intestines of the full grown animals are from forty to fifty feet long.

VACCINATION

  "I am not afraid of smallpox. I will never have the disease because I have had cowpox." These words of a fishmonger, overheard by Edward Jenner, furnished the motive for research and experiment which led to the introduction of vaccination.

TAKE A LOOK AT THAT NEW STYLE COAL RANGE AT FRYE & SON'S.


TO GOOD TO BE TRUE

That's what some folks think of the "Special Values" we offer.
Why do they hesitate to investigate?
Do you know that others who have taken advantage
Of our special sales eagerly watch for our advertisements?
We never offer a value that isn't worth every cent
We claim for it. We never call a 10c article a 15c
One at 10c. When we make a comparison values
The prices we use are those asked everywhere
By other stores and required by the manufacturers.
All this because we plan to have some May sales
Out of the ordinary and want you to accept our
Statements as made and take advantage of our offers.

WEAVER'S
5 10 AND 25 CENT STORE


LUMBER IS GOING UP AND PRICES STILL GOING HIGHER. BETTER
|GET IN YOUR ORDERS NOW.
LILLER'S LUMBER PARLORS
KEYSER, W VA


HOUSE CLEANING IS IN ORDER
EVERY HOME WILL NEED NEW FURNISHINGS
KLINE'S BIG STORE
FEATHER BUILDING, MAIN STREET
HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING FOR THE HOME

LACE CURTAINS SPECIALS THIS WEEK
75 C Curtains, tan or white, for this week only----------48c
$1.50 Curtains, only----------98c
$2 & $2.50 Curtains only----------$1.26
Bed Spreads, in many desirable patterns----------98c
$2 Bed Spreads----------$1.29
$2.50 Bed Spreads----------$1.59

LADIES DRESSES
$3 Linen Dresses----------$1.48
$5 Lawn Dresses----------$2.79
$7 Serge Dresses----------$5.95
$12 Messaline Dresses----------$8.95
$18 Messaline Dresses----------$12.48

MEN'S CLOTHING
$10 Serge Suits----------$5.95
$12 Serge Suits----------$8.48
$18 Serge Suits----------$11.75
$20 Serge Suits----------$14.25


FURNISHING GOODS REDUCED BARGAINS IN WOMEN'S UNDERWEAR

15C Ladies Gauze Vests Trimmed in Lace, an excellent value
Special this week----------8c
75c Ladies Fine Lisle Silk Union Suits
Special this week----------39c

WE INVITE AN INSPECTION
Of our most excellent Line of Goods which will be found prices so low that a Dollar will do double duty---and no mistake.

KLINE BIG STORE
FEATHER BUILDING
KEYSER, W VA


TRANSCRIBED BY CANDY SHILLINGBURG
JULY 6, 2002


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