MINERAL DAILY NEWS

 

JUNE 1, 1914


FOREIGNER HORRIBLY TREATED AND ROBBED

Knocked in the head, Relieved of his earnings

And thrown from a moving freight train.

Elay Gigovic, a Polish laborer, was an object of pity at the local B&O station yesterday, with his head bound up and his coat covered with blood. Gigovic drew his pay Friday and came to Piedmont Saturday to send his earnings to his wife in his homeland, and finding the postoffice closed at that place, came on to Keyser, thinking the office would be open here. At Piedmont he got on a freight and two men with him one he says, worked with him five days. Between Piedmont and this place two men robbed him and threw him off, and it is reported that trainmen on a passing freight saw the men hit Gigovic and then throw him from the moving train. The train was stopped and the men found Gigovic in an unconscious condition. He was immediately turned over to the authorities who had his wounds treated, and yesterday he was given a ticket to Cumberland, from which place he will go to Middletown, Md. Gigovic said he had $47.00 and that he did not know the two men who robbed him. He was severely cut about the head. An effort was made to find his assailants but as yet they are at large.


DEATH FROM INJURIES RECEIVED IN BOILER EXPLOSION

Death relieved the suffering of Joe Boyce on Saturday, he having been helpless for over two years. He leaves a wife and two boys 2 and 5 years old. Interment was made today at the Duling church. The death of Boyce recalls the sad and fatal accident of the boiler explosion up the creek on Oct 15, 1912, when Mr D W Eagle, John Smith and John Gray lost their lives, and the farther sad ending of the life of Fred Davis when assisting in the digging of the graves for the men who died in the explosion. Two other men, Olin Eagle and Alex Shears were the only ones to escape death, and young Boyce was so badly injured that his life was dispaired of, and after many weeks in the Hoffman Hospital he was able to walk for a time. Recently he had been in a very critical condition.


THE HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT

The commencement exercises in connection with closing of the High School for the present year were held in the auditorium of the High School on last Friday night. A class of seven was graduated this year consisting of six girls and one boy. Those receiving diplomas were: Miss Alma Peter, Miss Mabel Silfies, Miss May Paris, Miss Estelle Berrett, Miss Frances Hoover, Miss Ruth Hollen and Mr J Clark Bright. The auditorium was well filled with friends and patrons of the school. The address to the graduates was delivered by Hon A S Goldsborough, Secretary to the Industrial Commission of Baltimore City. Seldom has there been an address delivered in Keyser which has been so well received by the people in general as the one delivered on Friday night. The address from beginning to end was full of good sense, wholesome advice and pure logic. Mr Goldsborough is a speaker of rare ability and the people of Keyser are indebted to him for the splendid address. The diplomas were presented to the Graduates by Atty C N Finnell, a member of the school board. The gold medals were presented by Prin J L Dunkle and the other awards by Supt J C Sanders. Music for the occasion was furnished by McIlwee Orchestra.


NOTICE

During my absence from Keyser, which will probably extend over a month or six weeks, I have left my accounts with Donald P Davis, and hope that, as far as possible, those indebted to me will pay him, at Mr Watson’s office. W H Yeakley, MD


NEARLY THOUSAND LIVES LOST

Nearly a thousand lives were lost when the American Pacific Liner the Empress of Ireland sank after she had been rammed by the collier Dorstad in the St Lawrence Friday. According to a revised list made up today, 447 persons were saved, most of these are now in Quebec and being cared for by the municipal authorities and the officials of the Canadian Pacific line. The Dorsted arrived in port under her own steam, but her smashed bows gave terrific and terrible evidence of the part she played in the fearful disaster. Investigation will be made by the Canadian government of the disaster and all the stories told by the survivors emphasize the one big fact that the victims faced death bravely in the fog and darkness of the early morning, and there was no panic.


MR GOLDSBOROUGH’S

KEYSER HIGH SCHOOL

COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS

Interesting Comment on the

Address of Mr Goldsborough Friday Night.

With the intense heat modified by recent local rains, the audience packed the seating capacity over the ample floor of the High School auditorium Friday evening, May the 29th, 1914, was not only comfortable but well keyed in a happy mood for the expected exercises. Attractive ladies in bright colors, with gentlemen at their best, deepened an interest and lent a glamor not unworthy of an orator’s presence. With rather of surprising punctuality, just when the finer of time indicated the appointed hour, officers of the school, officers of the county board, Rectors of various churches and the Orator of the evening, entered the hall and walked in procession up a central aisle, amidst the clapping of fair hands and the stamping of men’s feet, to assigned places on the brightly lighted stage. The thrill of the music and enlivenment of the scene would be as difficult to portray as it is to forget. There was a quick but steady concentration of all eyes upon the speaker in his maiden bow before a Keyser greeting. While under an estimating scrutiny of hundreds, Mr Goldsborough, with a beaming face, directed a scanning gaze over the sea of heads before him and appeared once in warm touch with the heart-throbs of an inspiring environment. At the close of a terse but complimentary introduction by Prof Sanders, Mr Goldsborough stood out erect and passive at the foot-lights, waiting the end of an enthusiastic reception. His youthful features did not presage the sound logic and grave council usual before a graduating class and, viewed as he stood before us, the suggestion was rather that of the manish boy ready for any fun the moment might offer. When the generous welcome of a polite assemblage be subsided as to permit him to speak, his voice was clear, rich and strong, reaching with ease and distinctness the remotest portions of the hall, each word in every sentence clean cut and well pronounced. An actual possibility open to every student of merit, courage and application ran as golden thread through the entire framework of his thoughtfully constructed address. However, dense might seem the wilderness and untrodden the way, the fixed gaze would catch a light through all entanglements to an eventual triumph. The speaker roamed a wide field but never descended to the weakness of a “play to the galleries” nor to a revival of discarded platitudes at the expense of the subject; the flash-lights over the mental travel came and went as sparkles over a freshening sea, telling of the depths and compass from which they sprang. By common consent, the discourse was strong in conception and elevating in tone, from first to last, there was no relaxation in the grasp of the subject nor loss to view of the brightest example in the purest walks and ends of life; and indeed, it may be long before the hearer will cease to remember the contrast, so chastely drawn, between the perfect flower and such a device as art may impose, and how the close he left the chosen flower as the Lady, in the full fruition of her accomplishments, unrivaled upon the pedestal from which it blooms.


CLOSING NOTICE

We desire to notify our customers that, beginning June 1, our store will be closed every evening during the week at 7:00, except Saturday and pay day evenings. LYON & COMPANY.


TEACHERS EXAMINATION

The second teachers examination for the season will be held Thursday and Friday, June 4th and 5th, in the study hall of the Prep School, beginning at 7:30 o’clock the first morning. R W THRUSH, County Sup’t of Schools.


BIG OIL WELL COME IN FOR LOCAL PEOPLE

Messrs C W Seiver, James E Sheetz, Dan Bailey and A V Park returned Saturday from the Smithfield oil belt, where they had been looking over their oil leases in that section. While there they had the pleasure of seeing an 100 barrel well come in on their land. Two other wells are flowing, not so large, however, and the gentlemen feel very good over the last well, which bid fair to be a moneymaker for them.


BOY SCOUTS TO HOLD LAWN FETE

The local troop of Boy Scouts will hold a lawn fete tomorrow (Tuesday) evening on the lot to the rear of the Presbyterian church. Extension preparations have been made for this. McIlwee’s Band will be in attendance and refreshments will be served by the Domestic Science Girls of the High School. The people of Keyser should support this worthy organization by patronizing the boys.


W C T U MEETING

The regular monthly meeting of the WCTU for the month of June will be held at the home of Mrs Ida Reese, 156 Centre street, on Tuesday, June 2, at 8 o’clock pm. As this is the completion of the third quarter of the year, the ladies are especially requested to be present with their “quarters.” Secretary


MEDALS AWARDED TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FRIDAY

A very pleasant feature in connection with the High School Commencement on Friday night was the awarding of medals and awards for some excellence in school work during the year. The medal for “best all around” student was awarded to Miss Alma Peters of the Senior class; The medal for “loyalty to duty” was awarded to Miss Estelle Berrett also of the senior class. The Senior class medal was awarded to Miss Ruth Hollen; the Junior medal to Miss Helen Pownall; and Sophomore medal to Lysle Everhart, and the Freshman medal to Harry Taylor. To the winners of the prizes in the Literary contest a two dollar and half gold piece was awarded to each. Those getting the gold were: J Clark Bright, Howard Wells, Frank Cheshire, Miss May Paris, Miss Alma Peters and Ernest Shore.


FIRE ALARM WAKES THE CITY

Keyser’s people were awakened at an unusual hour this morning, when the fire alarm sounded and called the fire laddies to the Richardson Furniture Co’s plant where a blaze had started to eat in the plant. It was but a few minutes until the water was turned on and the fire was out. It was not known just what started the fire and each person forms his own opinion about it. The fire was in the engine room just over the large boilers and was burning in some shaving when discovered. The loss was slight, but the mill had to close for the day on account of it as there might have been some damage done to the boilers by being heated.


YOUNG MAN KILLED BY LIGHTENING

Earl Smith struck by lightening and body badly burned

Isaac Painter rendered unconscious

During an electrical storm Friday noon Earl Smith, the 19 year old son of Mr and Mrs Will Smith of near Petersburg, Grant County, was struck by lightening and killed. The young man was at work with Isaac Painter on a barn at his father’s home when the barn was struck. Mr Painter was rendered unconscious by the shock and when he came to, he was horrified to see the clothing of young Smith burning and the body terribly charred. The body was laid to rest in the cemetery at Petersburg Saturday, attended by a large number of sorrowing relatives and friends. The mother and father and a number of brothers survive. Mr Ed Smith of this city an uncle, and Howard Smith went up and attended the funeral.


ADDITIONAL PERSONALS

Mr and Mrs J C Sharpless and children of Gormania spent from Friday until Monday with Mrs C A Sharpless.

 

Harry Furniss of Baltimore is a business visitor in Keyser.

 

Gifts for Graduates—Romig’s have many gift suggestions that will be appreciated.

 

Mr and Mrs T H Hollen of Cumberland visited friends here over Sunday.

 

Miss Myro Roberts of Piedmont spent a few days with Miss Susan Abernathy.

 

If you want to rent a new house call at the News office.

 

Mr Harry Shutte of Baltimore spent Saturday and Sunday with his wife and son who are visiting her mother, Mrs A E Moore.


ADVERTISEMENTS

 

 

GOOD DISHWASHER wants job in restaurant or hotel.

Address Miss Maggie Kerns, Keyser, W Va

 

 

FURNISHED ROOMS

To rent at 39 Main St.

 

 

C O ARBOGAST

The plumber, will glad to give you

Prices on your plumbing.

 

 

THE HOWARD WATCH

Is the ideal Commencement gift for HIM

Also remember that BIG BEN has his headquarters at

EVANS, THE LEADING JEWELER

 

 

PEOPLES BANK OF KEYSER

J D LEPS, CASHIER

 

 

NOTHING STALE AT THIS STORE

Remember that anything you buy at this store

Is guaranteed ABSOLUTELY FRESH and PURE.

Nothing kept over until age effects it but a fresh stock

At all time. You’ll be satisfied if you buy from our line

Of GROCERIES and Table Supplies.

J W WOLFORD

The Groceryman

Armstrong Street


TRANSCRIBED BY CANDY SHILLINGBURG, 15 MARCH 2004


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