MINERAL COUNTY W VA
JULY 1898



PROFITABLE PURSUITS OPEN TO CAPITALISTS AND INDUSTRIOUS SETTLERS
KEYSER'S TRIBUTARY TERRITORY, WHICH IS RICH IN MINERAL AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES

 

COUNTY OFFICERS
R W Dailey Jr, Judge of the Circuit Court
J V Bell, Clerk Circuit Court
F C Reynolds, Prosecuting Attorney
W E Heskett, Sheriff
Floyd Knight, Deputy Sheriff
L O Davis, Deputy Sheriff
Thomas P Adams, County Surveyor
C F Hahn, County Superintendent of Schools
D C Arnold, Assessor West District
P M Dayton, Assessor East District
County Commissioners: P S Minshall, Michael Masteller, George Arnold
Clerk County Court, J V Bell
Deputy Clerk Circuit and County Courts, J A Fifer
Assessed valuation of real estate (except railroad property in 1897, $2,733,460.00
Railroad Property, 901,091.83
Personal property, 944,810.00
Rate of tax ? for all county purposes 35c on $100.00
Population, 1890, 12,085
Estimate population in 1898, 15,000
Area 300 sq. miles

 

  Mineral County, W Va, was created in 1866 by a subdivision of Hampshire county, and has an area of 300 square miles. It is located in the northeastern portion of the state, being bounded on the north by the Potomac River, which separates it from Allegiant Co, Md., on the east by Hampshire Co, W Va, on the south by Grant Co, W Va and on the west by Garrett and Allegany Counties, Md.
  Among the first county officials were Jas H Trout, sheriff; Jas I Barrick, clerk of the circuit and county courts; D T Greenwade, deputy clerk of circuit and county courts; Thos P Adams, county superintendent of schools and Judge Bunker, judge of circuit court.
  The topography of the county is mountainous, interspersed by rich valleys and the entire country is well watered and timbered. Mineral takes its name from its immense deposits of coal and iron ore, the former being mined extensively. there are numerous indications of oil, and this fact will doubtless lead to large operations in the future.
  The fertile lowlands and almost equally productive hillsides offer a diversity of soil suitable to every description of agricultural pursuit known to the climate. Along the Potomac from east to west, and from north to south in the New Creek and Patterson Creek valleys, are thousands of acres of as rich farming and as any section can boast. The soil of the bottom lands, enriched by the deposits of the streams for centuries, is practically inexhaustible, and no fertilization is required to a large saving in expense to farmers. On the hillsides all kinds of small fruit reach a state of perfection seldom equaled, and of late years more and more attention is being given to orchards. The chief products of the arm and field include: Wheat, corn, barley, oats, hay, buckwheat, vegetables of all kinds, small fruits and berries, melons of all varieties. Every known vegetable does well here, and this fact taken in connection with the possibilities in fruit raising, offers an unexampled opportunity for the establishing of a cannery.
  The raising of fine and blooded stock, cattle, sheep and hogs has of late years proven very remunerative, and a number of extensive herds of high grade cattle are now owned here. Notable among these enterprises is the Knobley Stock Farm of Arnold Bros, some seven miles from Keyser, where the breeding of registered Aberdeen Angus Cattle is carried on.
  A creamery and dairy would assuredly yield magnificent dividends, and should be established in the near future.
  The marketable timber of mineral county includes red and white oak, pine, locust, walnut, poplar and ash and there is a constant demand at lucrative prices. the large tannery of the US Leather Co, located on New Creek, some six miles from Keyser, makes heavy purchases of hemlock and oak bark.
  Farm lands are not held at exorbitant prices, and the people will gladly welcome industrious newcomers. to tenant farmers in thickly populated sections, Mineral County possesses irresistible attractions. Any industrious and intelligent worker can soon acquire his own home in this locality. No educational or refining influences are absent, the climate is superb, health conditions are unexcelled, and the cost of living extremely low. The people now here are mostly Americans, and they extend the social hand of fellowship and fraternity.
  Mineral county has one of the first court houses in W Va. The original building was erected in 1868, and in 1893 an extensive addition, costing $10,000 was constructed. It is now modern in every particular, with fire-proof vaults, for the preservation of records, electric lights, a hot air furnace, etc. The massive brick building is an architectural triumph, and greatly adds to the appearance of Keyser. The well-kept grounds occupy an entire block. A new jail is soon to be built which will embody the latest ideas and innovations.

TRANSCRIBED OCTOBER 28, 2001 BY PATTI MCDONALD

RETURN TO KEYSER TRIBUNE JULY 1898
RETURN TO MINCO NEWS
RETURN TO MINERAL