TRAIN"

B & O. R. R. CO'S. NOVEL SEMI-CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT

Wheeling Intelligencer, Friday, June 20, 1913
[& subsequent days].


Submitted by Phyllis Dye Slater; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: The Ohio County Library is on the site of the Old Hempfield Yard.


BIG EXHIBITION IN THE HEMPFIELD YARD

One of the most wonderful exhibitions that will be seen during the semi-centennial celebration will be given in the Hempfield yards of the B. & O. Railroad Company on Sixteenth street, both this morning and this afternoon.

This morning from 10 o'clock until noon all of the engines which have been gathered here by the company and which depict the evolution of the locomotive, will be operated over the tracks in the yard by their own power. When this exhibition is staged the thousands of spectators who are expected to attend will have an opportunity of seeing and understanding the difficulties of travel 50 years ago. Engines of the oldest type, which were operated on the roads in the east in 1843, will be operated here to-day and the oldest employes of the B. & O. Company, some of whom have seen 50 years of service, will have charge of the engines to-day.

At 1:30 o'clock the engines will be lined up in the order of their age, the oldest locomotive leading and others following in order of age, and all will be operated down the Seventeenth street tracks. At this time, the spectators will have an opportunity to see operated the newest and largest engine now used by the B. & O. Company. This engine, the 300 ton monster of the Mallet type, has been on exhibition in the Hempfield yards for several days and has attracted much attention because of its immense size. This afternoon it will be operated down the Seventeenth street tracks for a considerable distance. This exhibition alone is worth going miles to see, as the engine is over 100 feet long and the boiler sways from side to side on the trucks in rounding a curve.


HISTORICAL LOCOMOTIVES TO MOVE AGAIN TO-DAY

As has been previously announced, between 9 and 11 a.m. and 3 to 5 p.m., the old historical horse-drawn passenger car and locomotives, as also the huge modern "Mallet," will again move under their own heads of steam. This is to be however, only back and forth on their own tracks in the Hempfield yard.

The same crews that were assigned on Wednesday to handle the old engines and cars will be in their respective places. Veterans W. O. Peach and John Smith, driver and conductor of the horse power passenger coach; J. J. Brady, Michael Dee and James Mahoney together operating the "Atlantic"; J. E. Spurrier and W. F. Staunch on the "Thomas Jefferson," with Henry C. Elder on the car attached; R. A. Hutchinson, W. H. Havebfield and Z. T. Brantner in charge of the old "Mississippi"; E. Provance and Abner T. Ingels running the "Dragon"; Michael Kirby and C. J. Carpenter on the Chicago & Northwestern "Pioneer"; John Seibert and J. H. Fosnot attending to the movement of the Cumberland Valley "Pioneer" and passenger coach; W. H. Fleming and Traveling Fireman O. Schwart looking after the "Camel," and last, but not least, J. B. Daugherty, master mechanic of the Benwood shops, and J. S. Little, road foreman of engines, Wheeling district, doing their share by moving the big "Mallett."

Doubtless a large number of local persons will attend the demonstration as much interest has been manifested locally in the exhibit. When the first demonstration was made Wednesday almost 5,000 persons gathered in the Hempfield yard and along Seventeeth street, and many were unable to be present. These persons will no doubt turn out largely to see the pioneers in railroad building work.

For many this will probably be the last time that such a display can be seen. The engines have been sent here for exhibition, and residents and visitors alike have been taking advantage of the opportunity offered to visit once more the engines of the early days.

RELICS OF THE PAST

Note: Photos in the newspaper article are too dark to post on this website. The descriptions:

  • Chicago & Northwestern "Pioneer" in the Foreground and "Dragon" in the Background. These Engines were used in the Late '60s and Early '70s.

  • B. & O. "Camel Back" No. 217. This type of engine was used by the B. & O. Company in this district as late as 1891.

  • 300 Ton Mallet Engine. This is a type of the large mountain engines now used by the B. & O. in the West Virginia Mountain Region.

  • Old Timers. Thomas Jefferson or "Grasshopper" in the Foreground and Cumberland Valley "Pioneer" in the Background. These engines were among the first used.

  • ENGINES TO BIG EXPOSITION

    B. & O. Engines of "Ye Olden Times" May Go to Los Angeles Next Year

    Statement Made Yesterday That Display May Be Moved West
    Should Attract Much Attention.

    That the old Baltimore engines and coaches now proving an attraction for thousands at the Hempfield yards, will be exhibited at the Panama exposition at San Francisco, is a strong probability. It was stated yesterday by a B. & O. official that the final decision will not be made until this fall, but that the plan is being favorably considered.

    Should this be done, the unique collection would undoubtedly prove as big an attraction in San Francisco as it has here. Thousands flocked to the yards all day yesterday and women as well as men took great interest in tracing the development of the locomotive from the primitive types to the great mountain climber of to-day.


    OLD VETERANS AT WHEELING CELEBRATION

  • John Smith, pensioned conductor. Aged 91 years. First entered service 1852, and pensioned 1910. Total service, 58 years.

  • Michael Kirby, pensioned engineer - Aged 69 years. First entered service in 1852, and pensioned 1910. Total service, 58 years.

  • Abner T. Ingels, pensioned engineer - Aged 79 years. First entered service in 1855, and pensioned 1908. Total service, 53 years.

  • Joseph J. Brady, pensioned engineer - Aged 68 years. First entered service in 1862, and pensioned 1912. Total service, 50 years.

  • John E. Spurrier, of general staff and still in service. Fifty years in service and in charge of the old veterans.

  • Z. T. Brantner, superintendent of Martinsburg shops. Fifty years' service and still at work. Aged 65 years.

  • William Fleming, pensioned engineer - Aged 69 years. First entered service in 1868, and pensioned 1912. Total service, 44 years.

  • Henry C. Elder, pensioned - Aged 67 years. First entered service in 1865, and pensioned in 1909. Total service 44 years.

  • Ephraim Provance, pensioned engineer - Aged 73 years. First entered service in 1866, and pensioned 1909. Total service 43 years.

  • Robt. A. Hutchinson, pensioned - Aged 67 years. First entered service in 1865 and pensioned 1908. Total service, 43 years.

  • James Mahoney, still in service. Mt. Clare shops. Aged 66 yeaWilliam Westrater, pensioned conductor - Aged 75 years. First entered service in 1866, and pensioned 1902. Total service, 36 years.

  • William Westrater, pensioned conductor - Aged 75 years. First entered service in 1866, and pensioned 1902. Total service, 36 years.

  • Michael Dee, still in service at Mt. Clare - Aged -- years. First entered service 1882. To date 30 years in service.

  • General Manager Charles Galloway and General Superintendent Peck, of the Pittsburgh District, were in the city during the day, as was also Mr. Ostend, general passenger agent of the Baltimore & Ohio at Chicago.

  • MANY PERSONS WITNESS PARADE OF OLD ENGINES

    Veteran Employes of B. & O. Company Operate As Of Old

    Old Horse Car Leads Procession and
    Development of Locomotive Building Shown

    Over 4,000 people crowded the Hempfield yards of the B. & O. Railroad Company on Sixteenth street and lined Seventeenth street east to Wood yesterday afternoon to witness one of the most spectacular and unique scenes ever made possible to Wheelingites. Promptly at 1:30 o'clock all of the old engines and cars which have been gathered here at a great expense by the B. & O., and which depict the evolution of railroading in the United States, ran out of the yards under their own steam and out the Seventeenth street tracks. All were driven by grizzly old veteran railroaders, many of whom have been in the employ of the company over 50 years, and, although several hobbled up to their engines on canes and had to be assisted into the cab, once mounted the age seemed to roll from their shoulders, and they handled the ancient locomotives as perfectly as they did 50 years ago.

    But not only did the thousands of spectators see the engines of olden times in motion. The great 300 ton Mallet locomotive, the largest engine used by the B. & O. company, which is over 100 feet in length, was the first to be driven out of the yeards. On account of the great length of this locomotive, it is built so that, in taking a curve, the boiler rocks from side to side on the trucks, and this could be seen when the engine rounded the slight curve at Seventeenth and Wood streets. The other engines followed the Mallet, the old horse car bringing up the rear.

    Parade Formed

    At Seventeeth and Wood streets the unique parade was formed and all engines being operated under their own steam, passed down the main tracks amid the cheers of thousands who lined the streets.

    Leading the parade was the old horse car, the first means of railway transportation used in the United States.

    On the car drawn by the gray horse was W. O. Peach, whose active service has covered forty-seven years and not yet terminated, he now having charge of an important department in the company's shops at Mt. Clare, Baltimore. Mr. Peach was the driver while within the car was John Smith as conductor. Mr. Smith is now in his ninety-first year and has had a most interesting service with the company, extending over fifty-eight years. Back in the time when there was no all-rail direct connection between the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore and the Baltimore & Ohio at Baltimore, it was the practice to draw the cars through Pratt street, Baltimore, by what was known as a string team of horses. Mr. Smith was the driver of this team and in 1857 drove the car in which President Buchannon went to Washington for his inauguration. Four years later he performed the same service in connection with Abraham Lincoln's first inauguration, driving the car containing Mr. Lincoln from the President street station to Camden station. Something over four years afterward he was the driver of the car tht carried President Lincoln's body from Camden station to President street station.

    On the "Atlantic," the grasshopper engine were J. J. Brady, who was in active service for fifty-eight years, and Michael Dee and J. Mahoney who are still in the service, having closed their first half century and there is every indication of their being good for another ten years at least.

    The Mississippi

    Next came the Mississippi operated in 1835. This quaint old engine with box-like cab that akmost completely covers the short boiler, was in charge of James Mahoney, aged sixty-six, who entered the service in 1865 and was pensioned in 1908, serving a total of forty-five years. Z. T. Brantner, aged sixty-five years, who has been in the service for fifty years and is still employed as superintendent of the Martinsburg shops, acted as fireman on the Mississippi.

    Following the Mississippi came the Thomas Jefferson, with bell clanging, smoke pouring out from the large bell-mouthed stack. This engine, which was in the service in 1836, was driven by J. E. Spurrier, of the general manager's staff and who has been in the service for 49 years. W. F. Stanch, a traveling fireman working on the Wheeling division, acted as fireman of the Thomas Jefferson.

    The Thomas Jefferson was followed by the C. & N. W. "Pioneer," one of the best preserved engines for its age in the country, which was the first engine to appear in the Northwest in 1848. Michael Kirby, a pensioned engineer, who is 69 years of age, had charge of the engine. Mr. Kirby as probably seen more years of service than any other engineer in the country, he having entered the service in 1852 and served until 1910, a total of 58 years, before he was pensioned, Robert Hutchinson who is 66 years of age and has seen 45 years of service, acted as foreman on the Pioneer.

    Next came the Cumberland Valley "Pioneer," which was operated through the Cumberland Valley in 1851. This engine was in charge of Engineer John Sibert, who is 75 years of age and was in charge of the engine during the time she was operated between Baltimore and Cimberland. R. Fostnot, one of the oldest fireman in the employ of the company, assisted Mr. Sibert.

    Following the Cumberland Valley, "Pioneer" came the Dragon, operated in the east in 1856. This engine was driven by Ephraim Provance, aged 73 years. Mr. Provance is a pensioned engineer, having seen 43 years of service from 1866 to 1909. In the cab with Mr. Provance rode Abner Ingels, aged 79 years, who first entered the service in 1855 and was pensioned in 1908, after serving 53 years.

    Then came the "Camel," which attracted great attention from the spectators on account of the fact that it was operated into and out of Wheeling in 1863, hauling supplies to the Union soldiers in Virginia. The Camel was driven by William Fleming, aged 69 years, who first entered the service in 1868 and was pensioned in 1912, serving a total of 44 years. O. Schwart, a traveling fireman employed by the company, acted as fireman on the Camel.

    Bringing up the rear of the grand parade was the 300 ton monster Mallet engine, the largest used by the B. & O. This engine was in charge of J. B. Daugherty and J. S. Little, was regarded with awe by the spectators as it rolled slowly down the rails. After the engines had been run down the main tracks they were switched into the Hempfield yards again, and will remain there during the semi-centennial.

    Exhibition in the Morning

    The Hempfield yards also presented a scene of activity yesterday morning, when all of the old engines were fired up preparatory to the afternoon parade. Smoke issued from the stacks of all the engines for the first time in many years, and the bells, brightened by much polishing, clanged merrily. The old combination express and passenger coach of the Cumberland Valley railroad was thrown open for inspection, and continuous streams of people went through the car, inside of which was shown a model of the old sleeping coach that was run between Chambersburg and Harrisburg. Tacked on the walls of the car were old tickets used sixty years ago by the company, and these attracted much attention. The car will be open for inspection again to-day and each day until the close of the semi-centennial.


    OLDEST EMPLOYE OF B. & O. CO.

    Philip M'Cardle Worked in Hempfield Yard In Early Days

    Is Past 99 Years Old, But Says That He Is Young and Could Do Work Again

    Triadelphia, the oldest village in the State, boasts the oldest B. & O. employe in the United States in the person of Philip McCardle, who, if he lives until next May, will be 100 years old. Despite this great age, however, and the tremendous amount of labor that the veteran has performed in the past 99 years, his step is as firm and his sight as keen as that of a man just half his age.

    Mt. McCardle was born in Newport Pratt, Mayo county, Ireland, May 1, 1814. When 30 years of age he became enthused with the dreams of golden America, where so many of his countrymen had emigrated and had met success. Following in their footsteps, he started for this country, and after spending 52 days in crossing the rough Atlantic, landed in New York in June 1844.

    He immediately secured employment with the B. & O. railroad as a section hand, and went to work in the vicinity of Philadelphia, Pa. Within a short time he was made foreman of a traveling section crew, and helped build the tunnel known as No. 1, east of the city, and later worked about the Hempfield yards.

    When in the city yesterday as the guest of the B. & O., Mr. McCardle was interviewed by an Intelligencer reporter and told many interesting stories of scenes in Wheeling during the early fifties. "Where the city building now stands," said Mr. McCardle, "there was a great mud hole, while the children used to play in a frog pond where the cathedral is located. There were no houses built in the vicinity of Wheeling creek, while the South Side of to-day was another village then, being separated from the city by a large farm." "The island at that time was mde up of three farms, the lower portion belonging to the Zane estate, while the fair grounds were covered with willows. The old stage was a familiar sight on the National Pike in those days, while the mail stage rushed through the city at regular intervals, changing horses every ten miles. The village of Triadelphia was one of the changing points in those days and was quite a commercial center, boasting a flour mill, the Vance pork packing plant, and two large taverns, where rival stage coach lines changed horses."

    Grandson Employe of B. & O.

    Mr. McCardle makes his home with a daughter, Mrs. Mark Cracraft, his wife having passed away many years ago, while his only living son is postmaster at Charleroi, Pa. "Jimmie" Cracraft, a grandson, has followed in the footsteps of Mr. McCardle, and is at present in the employ of the B. & O., being secretary to the superintendent of the motive power plant in this city. Mr. McCardle is a great booster for Wheeling and says that if he lives ten years longer, Wheeling will have been built up east to Triadelphia, and he will be living in the city. It ha now been fifteen years since Mr. McCardle was in the employ of the company, but he claims that he could have worked several years longer without trouble, saying that he quit work "to enjoy life a little while."

    [NOTE: Philip McCardle married Eliza Baird, Jan. 19, 1854 in Ohio County, WV.]


    LITTLE ENGINES GIVE WELCOME

    Old Locomotives Brought By The B. & O. First to Congratulate

    Whistles Were Blown and Bells Were Rung Promptly at 12 o'clock, Opening State's Birthday

    As though glad of the opportunity to extend congratulations on the arrival of the fiftieth birthday of the State of West virginia, the tiny old engines in the Hempfield yard, brought here as an exhibit by the B. & O. Railroad Company blew forth the gladsome news promptly at 12 o'clock last night. These engine whistles were the first to extend greetings and the signals were taken up by the other engines in the yards and manufacturing plants throughout the city.

    The noise continued for fully 15 minutes, and although the large engine whistles sounded hoarsely, the little shrill whistles of the old relics of the company sounded high above the harsh sounds of the more modern ones. Bells rang, automobile horns were "honked" and all other kinds of noise was made to royally welcome the day. Large crowds were on the streets and the occasion will long be remembered as one of history making.

    The honors, however, must go to the little ancient looking engines that were used at the time and following that date, when the State was born. They were apparently proud of the record made by the State and a good example was made by these mute objects of the days of long ago.


    VETERANS OF B. & O. RAILROAD

    Coming to Wheeling on "Interstate Special" This Morning

    Will Operate Old Locomotives and Cars in Hempfield Yard To-Day

    Special Dispatch to the Intelligencer.

    BALTIMORE, MD, June 17 - When the "Interstate Special" of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad left here this evening it had attached to it a special car occupied by twenty veteran employes of the company, on their way to Wheeling to take part in the Semi-Centennial of West Virginia, and the sixtieth anniversary of the Baltimore & Ohio completion to the Ohio river, at Wheeling. The old railroad men resume active service for the week, and during the Wheeling celebration will answer the call boy and man the crude little locomotives and cars which were used in the early days of American railroading, when the Baltimore & Ohio was opened to Wheeling.

    They left Baltimore in charge of John Edward Spurrior, a member of the staff of General Manager Galloway, of the railroad company.

    In point of service, Mr. Spurrior is one of the oldest railroad officials in America, having been in active service on the Baltimore & Ohio for 50 years. The total years of service of the veteran railroad employes in the party aggregates 775 years. Among them were Michael Kirby, engineer, 58 yers; Abner T. Ingels, engineer, 53 years; Joseph J. brady, conductor, 50 years; James Brandon, conductor, 49 years; Z. T. Brantnor, superintendent of shops, 50 years; James Mahoney, yard man, 49 years; J. T. Mercer, brakeman, 46 years; Michael Doe, 50 years; J. C. Englehardt, conductor, 40 years; J. H. Fosnoot, conductor, 50 years; John Seibert, engineer, 46 years; and "Daddy" John Smith, brakeman, 58 years.

    Smith is the man who transferred the car of President Lincoln through Baltimore on the way to his first inauguration; also the funeral car which contained the remains of the martyred President.

    The railroad veterans will be met at Wheeling upon their arrival by former Senator Henry Gassaway Davis, of West Virginia, who worked with them on Baltimore & Ohio when a young man.


    HEMPFIELD YARDS ARE THRONGED WITH PEOPLE

    Old Engines Are Steamed Up Again

    They Cut Capers on Sidetracks Under Guidance
    of Crews Who Were Men Half Century Ago

    Something Concerning The Old-Time Crews

    The Hempfield yards were thronged with people and Seventeenth street was lined with them for the demonstration and parade, illustrating the history of railroading, given under the direction of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad company, about noon, yesterday. A half score of engines of various years participated.

    With great ringing of bells, and tooting of whistles, the old-time engines were started upon their wheezey and asthamatic ways. The "Mississippi," in its descpirtitude, refused to budge and was finally pushed out of the yards by the "Thomas Jefferson." It had steam up, however, before the return, and one lady who had been watching "the old boat" thought it "acted real frisky."

    The Return Parade

    The parade feature was, of course, the return down Seventeenth, when the engines appeared in the order of their entrance a half century or so ago in the engineering world.

    The horse drawn car returned first. Its motive power was an old white "plug" that seemed able to "give" age to the car. But at that the horse did its duty and got the car back safely to its position in the lower portion of the yards.

    The "Atlantic," 1832, followed. It is a "ringer" for a stationary engine mounted on a hand car. Next came the "Thomas Jefferson," drawing a passenger-carrying vehicle of the same period. The "Jeff" closely resembled the Atlantic, except that it was dressed like a western comedy scene lost in a railroad, and one could almost hear the whoops of the imaginary Indians following it.

    Back of these two it was the Mississippi. It was mostly all smoke-stack. Then came the two "Pioneers." These wer the first of the engines which "looked like engines," as one person put it; the boilers and cylinders were horizontal. The older was from the Chicago & Northwestern Railway; and the other was from the Cumberland Valley R.R. The latter engine drew a passenger car of its period. In the car is a smaller model of the first sleeping car used on the road in question.

    The "Dragon," and the "Camel" followed. While these two are old time engines, people not over a quarter of a century in age can still remember when they were in constant use as switching engines.

    The monster Mallet concluded the parade and while any number of such engines may be expected to be seen in the future, it attracted as much attention as the older locomotives. Its massive suggestions of latent power made it interesting to even those who not appreciate its mechanical beauties.

    The big Mallet, completed during February, 1911, and weighing 308 tons, was the first to move. Owing to the heaviness of the rails on the switches, it was run very slowly, barely creeping out Seventeenth. After the "Camelback," 217, had made a move to follow, the majority of the other little engines immediately got under way.

    The Men Who Made the Parade.

    The men taking part in the memorable parade yesterday showing the eighty years' development of railroad motive power were veterans of periods of active service extending from forty to fifty-eight years.

    On the car drawn by the grey horse at the head of theparade was W. O. Peach, whose active service has covered 47 years and not yet terminated; he now having charge of an important department in the company's shops at Mt. Clare, Baltimore. Mr. Peach was the driver, while within the car was John Smith as conductor. Mr. Smith is now in his 91st year and has had amost interesting service with the company extending ove 58 years. Back in the time when there was no all rail direct connections between the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore and teh Baltimore & Ohio, it was the practice to draw the cars through Pratt Street, Baltimore, by what was known as a string of horses. Mr. Smith was the driver of such teams and in 1857 drove the car in which President Buchannon went to Washington for his inauguration. Four years later he performed the same service in connection with Abraham Lincoln's first inauguration, driving the car containing Mr. Lincoln from the President Street Station to Camden Staion. Something over four years afterward he was the driver of the car that carried President Lincoln's body from Camden Station to President Street Station.

    On the "Atlantic," the Grasshopper engine, were J. J. Brady, who was in active service for 58 years, Michael Dee, who is still in the service, and J. Mahoney, also still in the service, both having closed their first half century and there is every inication of their being good for another ten years at least.

    On the "Thomas Jefferson" was J. E. Spurrier, another 50 year man and still in the service, he now holding a position on the general manager's staff. With him was W. F. Staunch, in service 42 years. In the car attached to the "Thomas Jefferson," was H. C. Elder, a 44 year man.

    One the "Mississippi" ws Z. T. Brantner, to whom Vice President Thompson some months ago presented a gold medal in commemoration of his rounding out a half century's service. Mr. Brantner is still in service as superintendent of the Martinsburg shops. With his as fireman was a 43 year man.

    On the Cumberland Valley "Pioneer" were J. Seibert as engineer and on the car attached was J. A. Fosnot as conductor. The former was in active service 40 years and the latter 44 years, both of them having served in like capacity on the engine and on the car when they were part of the regular equipment of the Cumberland Valley.

    On the Chicago & Northwestern "Pioneer," the first locomotive ever seen in Chicago, were M. Kirby and R. A. Hutchinson, the former 58 year man in active service and the later 40 years.

    On the "Dragon" were M. Provance, 43 years in active service and Abner T. Ingels another wearer of a gold medal in token of his fifty years of service.

    On the "Camel" were W. B. Fleming, 44 years' service and O. Schwart.

    On the monster "Mallet" were J. B. Daugherty, master mechanic of the Benwood shops and J. S. Little, road foreman of engines, Wheeling division.

    General Manager Charles Galloway and General Superintendent Peck of the Pittsburgh District were in the city during the day, as also Mr. Ostend, General Passenger Agent of the Baltimore & Ohio at Chicago.


    HEMPFIELD YARD EXHIBIT

    Will Be Removed Tonight and This Will Mean the Last of the Big Celebration

    The interesting exhibit of the B. & O. railroad at the Hempfield yards will be loaded on cars this evening and will be removed to Martinsburg, where it will be stored. The loading will be in charge of E. L. Bangs, chief speed recorder of the B. & O. system, of Baltimore. Mr. Bangs stated yesterday that he and his assistants, Col. Wo. O. Beach and B. D. Murray, had enjoyed greatly their stay in Wheeling and that they had never received better treatment anywhere in their lives than had been accorded them in Wheeling. Mr. Murray, the fireman along with the exhibit, stated that the monster engine which has been viewed by thousands, weighs 325 tons when it is filled with water. He also stated that the great "mogul" is used to haul heavy loads over the 17-mile grade as well as the Cranberry and Cheat river grades on the main line of the B. & O.

    In conclusion Mr. Murray stated that if the big engine got off the track that it could be handled and placed on the rails again with Sliam cranes, just in the same way that the smaller engines are handled.


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